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Download Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us Audiobook, by Daniel H. Pink Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (15,817 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Daniel H. Pink Narrator: Daniel H. Pink Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: January 2010 ISBN: 9781101145913
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Forget everything you thought you knew about how to motivate people—at work, at school, at home. It’s wrong. As Daniel H. Pink explains in his paradigm-shattering book Drive, the secret to high performance and satisfaction in today’s world is the deeply human need to direct our own lives, to learn and create new things, and to do better by ourselves and our world.

Drawing on four decades of scientific research on human motivation, Pink exposes the mismatch between what science knows and what business does—and how that affects every aspect of our lives. He demonstrates that while the old-fashioned carrot-and-stick approach worked successfully in the twentieth century, it’s precisely the wrong way to motivate people for today’s challenges.

Drive is a groundbreaking book that will change how you think—and transform how you live.

Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “A worthwhile read. It reminds us that those of us on the right side of the brain are driven furthest and fastest in pursuit of what we love.”

    Minneapolis Star Tribune

  • “Pink’s a gifted writer who turns even the heaviest scientific study into something digestible—and often amusing—without losing his intellectual punch.”

    New York Post

  • “Pink’s ideas deserve a wide hearing. Corporate boards, in fact, could do well by kicking out their pay consultants for an hour and reading Pink’s conclusions instead.”

    Forbes

  • “Pink is rapidly acquiring international guru status…He is an engaging writer, who challenges and provokes.”

    Financial Times

  • “Important reading…An integral addition to a growing body of literature that argues for a radical shift in how businesses operate.”

    Kirkus Reviews

  • “Pink makes a convincing case that organizations ignore intrinsic motivation at their peril.”

    Scientific American

  • “Pink’s analysis—and new model—of motivation offers tremendous insight into our deepest nature.”

    Publishers Weekly

  • “These lessons are worth repeating, and if more companies feel emboldened to follow Mr. Pink’s advice, then so much the better.”

    Wall Street Journal

  • “Persuasive…Harnessing the power of intrinsic motivation rather than extrinsic remuneration can be thoroughly satisfying and infinitely more rewarding.”

    Miami Herald

  • A New York Times Bestseller

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Melissa | 2/16/2014

    " Interesting stuff to be considering as I watch the Olympic and consider these athlete's path to the games. In a nutshell, it is all about autonomy, mastery, and purpose. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 David | 2/12/2014

    " Good to know that money is not the primary driver behind drive for excellence. Does make some sense. But unfortunately many of us workers do not get to choose our work assignment. So money is certainly the prime motivator. Also the fact that the productivity shoot up dramatically during the 2008 - 9 downturn proves that the fear (of lay off) is the prime factor behind an employee's drive. This would be a great book for employers who wants to minimize profit sharing. Wonder what Goldman guys think of this book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 John | 2/7/2014

    " This provides a different view on motivation than what we have previously believed. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gwyneth | 1/27/2014

    " I found a good chunk of this book to be interesting but rather dry, but when I got to the practical application portion I found myself taking notes and wanting to call all the young parents I know to see if they are using this approach with their children. Hopefully I will remember this book when I have children. I want my future child to keep his/her I-type approach to mastery! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Marianne Hetzer | 1/23/2014

    " I'm convinced that public schools nationwide need to adopt Motivation 3.0 as our pedagogical foundation. Away with carrots and sticks that make school a trial to be endured rather than an opportunity to develop autonomy, mastery and purpose. Blow away all standardized tests and set mastery as the goal -- you can't ever achieve it, but you can thoroughly and eternally delight in the pursuit. It sounds all dreamy and unrealistic, but it's not. Read the book (and other recommended authors)and learn the difference between what science knows and what business (and education) does. It made me very sad and simultaneously very hopeful. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Art Flores | 1/19/2014

    " Very text-book type of book. A little dry but with excellent information. I don't know how to make it less text-book like. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bill Saponaro | 1/12/2014

    " A fascinating book that explores the "why" behind what compels us to do some things, and not others. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Char | 1/10/2014

    " Loved the thought behind this book!!--that we as humans really WANT to grow and create and achieve and progress, and that our society of external motivators often squelches those natural instincts--it was a bright outlook on our potential, and the stories of businesses adapting models to support his theories were compelling. It DOES spark hope for positive things to come, and decent directions for getting there! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Emily | 1/8/2014

    " Great book. It all seemed like it was pretty obvious to me, but I could easily see how this could be new information to some folks. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Xi Xi | 10/20/2013

    " Just thought the summaries at the end of the book are not so necessary "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ann | 10/3/2013

    " The author articulated what I've seen to be true. An interesting read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Renee Blackmon | 8/11/2013

    " Very interesting science on the topic of motivation. Updated my thinking about the role motivation plays in my work. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Henry | 8/5/2013

    " I wish more people - in particular managers - could say "I already knew all that", but they don't. The world is a worse place for that. Still it helps me to find my passion - and hopefully I can help those who have not read it find theirs as well. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kimberly | 7/28/2013

    " This is a thoughtful & interesting book about what motivates people. There are some interesting theories which I see behind my drive. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kelly | 7/14/2013

    " Great book! I'd love to see education/schools move in the direction some corporations have moved to. Not just for teachers, but for kids as well. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Scott Harris | 9/19/2012

    " Read this for my MBA alumni reading group. I think this would be a great book for any business owner to read to establish a culture of happy and motivated employees. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mike Stancik | 9/1/2012

    " cool ideas, kindof got bogged down though "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steve Wilson | 8/22/2012

    " So far, it's not quite as engaging as his last book. I'm enjoying it well enough, though. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julia | 8/9/2012

    " Very interesting the way this book's discussion of autonomy is intersecting with the chapter on autonomy in the parenting book I'm currently reading (How to Talk so Kids will Listen and Listen so Kids will Talk). "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sho | 2/14/2012

    " Apparently carrots and sticks aren't it - we are motivated intrinsically not extrinsically. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Doreva | 11/21/2011

    " Very useful information in a quick, concise book. Definitely recommended. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris Hellstrom | 11/15/2011

    " Audio version. Much of this has been said in other recent books but I still thought it was interesting and worth reading. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Megan | 11/15/2011

    " Some of this was surprising, some not, but it did give me a lot to think about in terms of what motivates me, personally. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Pat | 9/25/2011

    " Despite the title, the truth is really not so surprising. Still, the book presents some really interesting research results so it has more solid ground that, say, a Malcolm Gladwell book tends too. It also has some good suggestions and guidelines for applying the ideas presented. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Darcy | 8/23/2011

    " Interesting. Gave me some things to think about. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 S. Elizabeth | 8/18/2011

    " The early part of the book repeats substantial material from 'Predictably Irrational'. The concept of flow is useful and interesting. The wide ranging education, work, and personal recommendations at the end would have been better on a website. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kimberly | 6/29/2011

    " A fascinating book. The ideas apply to business, parenting, teaching and many other situations. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dante | 6/27/2011

    " Not only do we work harder and longer at something we find internally satisfying, but adding a financial reward takes away any enjoyment we used to get from it. Beware monetizing your hobby! That insight alone is worth the read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 FATHOM+HATCH | 6/23/2011

    " Great perspective on primary drivers of human motivation | Has ramifications for how companies should re-consider employee incentives and giving them more freedom. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Maria del Pilar | 6/19/2011

    " I learnt about open-source, autonomy and motivating oneself and experiments. This book reports experiments findings. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alexis | 6/17/2011

    " Thought provoking, very catchy read. Provided great insight to what motivates me in the work place. Brett read this book in a few sittings and loved it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sarah | 6/17/2011

    " As a person who is highly intrinsically motivated, I found this book valuable as a validation of my own choices. One of my employers wants to move to a version of ROWE, and I want to get them to read this. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kathy | 6/15/2011

    " I listened to the MP3 Download of this book. Extrememly interesting with respect to motivation in the workplace, but valuable for personal use just to understand why people do what they do! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jennifer | 6/13/2011

    " Awesome book. I love Daniel Pink also. Both he and Malcolm Gladwell take what could be a dry subject, weave compelling stories, and really capture my attention. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jessica | 6/13/2011

    " I really liked this title. Many book club members thought it was common sense stuff but I felt like even though most people recognize the concepts they fail to put them into action. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Janet | 6/12/2011

    " Really loved it and think there are so many ideas that we need to be putting into place everywhere in our lives "

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About the Author
Author Daniel H. Pink

Daniel H. Pink is the author of several books, including the long-running New York Times bestsellers Drive and A Whole New Mind. His books have been translated into thirty-three languages and have sold more than a million copies in the United States alone. Pink lives with his family in Washington, DC.