Journey Through Time With Some Of Our Top History Audiobooks!

Step into a time machine and journey through history with our incredible selection of audiobooks. Immerse yourself in the stories and events that shaped the world we live in today, with expert narration and captivating storytelling that will transport you to another era. From ancient civilizations to modern conflicts, our history audiobooks cover a vast range of topics and periods, offering something for every history buff. Whether you're looking to expand your knowledge or simply enjoy a good story, our audiobooks bring the past to life in a way that will leave you enlightened and entertained. So sit back, relax, and let history unfold before your ears.

History Audiobooks Statistics

Total Audiobooks in this Category:

23,839 audiobooks

Total Authors in this Category:

26,708 authors

Average Audiobook Length:

11.43 hours

Average Audiobook Rating:

3.68/5

Audiobooks in the Top 50:

3

Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty Audiobook, by Patrick Radden Keefe

Author: Patrick Radden Keefe

Narrator: Patrick Radden Keefe

Audio Length: @1x speed 18.00 hours
@1.5x speed 12.00 hours
@2x speed 9.00 hours

Overall Rating: 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

Narrator Rating: 4.666666 out of 54.666666 out of 54.666666 out of 54.666666 out of 54.666666 out of 5

Story Rating: 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty Audiobook

A grand, devastating portrait of three generations of the Sackler family, famed for their philanthropy, whose fortune was built by Valium and whose reputation was destroyed by OxyContin, by the prize-winning, bestselling author of Say Nothing   The Sackler name adorns the walls of many storied institutions—Harvard, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Oxford, the Louvre. They are one of the richest families in the world, known for their lavish donations to the arts and the sciences. The source of the family fortune was vague, however, until it emerged that the Sacklers were responsible for making and marketing a blockbuster painkiller that was the catalyst for the opioid crisis.       Empire of Pain begins with the story of three doctor brothers, Raymond, Mortimer and the incalculably energetic Arthur, who weathered the poverty of the Great Depression and appalling anti-Semitism. Working at a barbaric mental institution, Arthur saw a better way and conducted groundbreaking research into drug treatments. He also had a genius for marketing, especially for pharmaceuticals, and bought a small ad firm.       Arthur devised the marketing for Valium, and built the first great Sackler fortune. He purchased a drug manufacturer, Purdue Frederick, which would be run by Raymond and Mortimer. The brothers began collecting art, and wives, and grand residences in exotic locales. Their children and grandchildren grew up in luxury.       Forty years later, Raymond’s son Richard ran the family-owned Purdue. The template Arthur Sackler created to sell Valium—co-opting doctors, influencing the FDA, downplaying the drug’s addictiveness—was employed to launch a far more potent product: OxyContin. The drug went on to generate some thirty-five billion dollars in revenue, and to launch a public health crisis in which hundreds of thousands would die.       This is the saga of three generations of a single family and the mark they would leave on the world, a tale that moves from the bustling streets of early twentieth-century Brooklyn to the seaside palaces of Greenwich, Connecticut, and Cap d’Antibes to the corridors of power in Washington, D.C.  Empire of Pain chronicles the multiple investigations of the Sacklers and their company, and the scorched-earth legal tactics that the family has used to evade accountability. The history of the Sackler dynasty is rife with drama—baroque personal lives; bitter disputes over estates; fistfights in boardrooms; glittering art collections; Machiavellian courtroom maneuvers; and the calculated use of money to burnish reputations and crush the less powerful.       Empire of Pain is a masterpiece of narrative reporting and writing, exhaustively documented and ferociously compelling. It is a portrait of the excesses of America’s second Gilded Age, a study of impunity among the super elite and a relentless investigation of the naked greed and indifference to human suffering that built one of the world’s great fortunes.

“Keefe's greatest strength is his clarity. He makes this complex web of corruption understandable and human. He writes about the Sacklers in all their complexity, not to make us feel for them, but in a way that demonstrates the enormous fallout of their human flaws when applied with so much money and power. An excellent work of nonfiction!”

— LFR
The Great Influenza: The Epic Story of the Deadliest Plague in History Audiobook, by John M. Barry

Author: John M. Barry

Narrator: Scott Brick

Audio Length: @1x speed 19.50 hours
@1.5x speed 13.00 hours
@2x speed 9.75 hours

Overall Rating: 4.6 out of 54.6 out of 54.6 out of 54.6 out of 54.6 out of 5

Narrator Rating: 4.666666 out of 54.666666 out of 54.666666 out of 54.666666 out of 54.666666 out of 5

Story Rating: 4.666666 out of 54.666666 out of 54.666666 out of 54.666666 out of 54.666666 out of 5

The Great Influenza: The Epic Story of the Deadliest Plague in History Audiobook

In the winter of 1918, at the height of World War I, history's most lethal influenza virus erupted in an army camp in Kansas, moved east with American troops, then exploded, killing as many as 100 million people worldwide. It killed more people in twenty-four weeks than AIDS has killed in twenty-four years, more in a year than the Black Death killed in a century. But this was not the Middle Ages, and 1918 marked the first collision between modern science and epidemic disease. Magisterial in its breadth of perspective and depth of research, THE GREAT INFLUENZA weaves together multiple narratives, with characters ranging from William Welch, founder of the Johns Hopkins Medical School, to John D. Rockefeller and Woodrow Wilson. Ultimately a tale of triumph amid tragedy, this crisis provides us with a precise and sobering model as we confront the epidemics looming on our own horizon.

“Excellent book that describes the history of a pandemic that killed at least 40 million people worldwide in a year's time. Though it was coined, "Spanish Influenza", the flu probablyoriginated in Kansas, the provides a view of the history of medicine in the UnitedStates.”

— Jeanne
1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus Audiobook, by Charles C. Mann

Author: Charles C. Mann

Narrator: Darrell Dennis

Audio Length: @1x speed 16.25 hours
@1.5x speed 10.83 hours
@2x speed 8.13 hours

Overall Rating: 4.5 out of 54.5 out of 54.5 out of 54.5 out of 54.5 out of 5

Narrator Rating: 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

Story Rating: 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus Audiobook

A groundbreaking study that radically alters our understanding of the Americas before the arrival of the Europeans in 1492. Traditionally, Americans learned in school that the ancestors of the people who inhabited the Western Hemisphere at the time of Columbus’s landing had crossed the Bering Strait twelve thousand years ago; existed mainly in small, nomadic bands; and lived so lightly on the land that the Americas was, for all practical purposes, still a vast wilderness. But as Charles C. Mann now makes clear, archaeologists and anthropologists have spent the last thirty years proving these and many other long-held assumptions wrong. In a book that startles and persuades, Mann reveals how a new generation of researchers equipped with novel scientific techniques came to previously unheard-of conclusions. Among them: • In 1491 there were probably more people living in the Americas than in Europe. • Certain cities–such as Tenochtitlán, the Aztec capital–were far greater in population than any contemporary European city. Furthermore, Tenochtitlán, unlike any capital in Europe at that time, had running water, beautiful botanical gardens, and immaculately clean streets. • The earliest cities in the Western Hemisphere were thriving before the Egyptians built the great pyramids. • Pre-Columbian Indians in Mexico developed corn by a breeding process so sophisticated that the journal Science recently described it as “man’s first, and perhaps the greatest, feat of genetic engineering.” • Amazonian Indians learned how to farm the rain forest without destroying it–a process scientists are studying today in the hope of regaining this lost knowledge. • Native Americans transformed their land so completely that Europeans arrived in a hemisphere already massively “landscaped” by human beings. Mann sheds clarifying light on the methods used to arrive at these new visions of the pre-Columbian Americas and how they have affected our understanding of our history and our thinking about the environment. His book is an exciting and learned account of scientific inquiry and revelation.

“It is difficult to talk about a hemisphere without leaving somethings out. The author talks mostly about South America, then some about mesoamerica, and lastly a little about North America. He posits that the populations were much larger and more diverse than they are typically given credit for by the modern reader. He does a good job of assuaging the reactions of repulsion towards what we may consider barbaric by making comparisons to Europe. He does not seem interested in pyramids and explains that no matter how friendly the contact was with the new world for various genetic reasons, massive disease was inevitable in the Americas. He also discusses how and why the Spaniards were able to defeat and conquer South America.”

— the plebian
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind Audiobook, by Yuval Noah Harari

Author: Yuval Noah Harari

Narrator: Derek Perkins

Audio Length: @1x speed 15.25 hours
@1.5x speed 10.17 hours
@2x speed 7.63 hours

Overall Rating: 4.5 out of 54.5 out of 54.5 out of 54.5 out of 54.5 out of 5

Narrator Rating: 4.428571 out of 54.428571 out of 54.428571 out of 54.428571 out of 54.428571 out of 5

Story Rating: 4.523809 out of 54.523809 out of 54.523809 out of 54.523809 out of 54.523809 out of 5

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind Audiobook

New York Times Bestseller

A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg

From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.”

One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us?

Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas.

Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become?

Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.

“Outstanding audio book. This "brief" history digs deeper into human evolution than I have ever gotten into. Really cool subjects are covered. I feel better learned about our history after listening to this book. Only downside: On a long road trip I can only listen to about 30 minutes at a time before getting tired. The upside of that is that by spreading out the listening of this book I probably absorbed more and could have interesting dialogue with friends that were also listening to it.”

— Geoffrey
Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History Audiobook, by S. C. Gwynne

Author: S. C. Gwynne

Narrator: David Drummond

Audio Length: @1x speed 15.25 hours
@1.5x speed 10.17 hours
@2x speed 7.63 hours

Overall Rating: 4.23913 out of 54.23913 out of 54.23913 out of 54.23913 out of 54.23913 out of 5

Narrator Rating: 4.6 out of 54.6 out of 54.6 out of 54.6 out of 54.6 out of 5

Story Rating: 4.65 out of 54.65 out of 54.65 out of 54.65 out of 54.65 out of 5

Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History Audiobook

*Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award*

*A New York Times Notable Book*

*Winner of the Texas Book Award and the Oklahoma Book Award*

This New York Times bestseller and stunning historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West “is nothing short of a revelation…will leave dust and blood on your jeans” (The New York Times Book Review).

Empire of the Summer Moon spans two astonishing stories. The first traces the rise and fall of the Comanches, the most powerful Indian tribe in American history. The second entails one of the most remarkable narratives ever to come out of the Old West: the epic saga of the pioneer woman Cynthia Ann Parker and her mixed-blood son Quanah, who became the last and greatest chief of the Comanches.

Although readers may be more familiar with the tribal names Apache and Sioux, it was in fact the legendary fighting ability of the Comanches that determined when the American West opened up. Comanche boys became adept bareback riders by age six; full Comanche braves were considered the best horsemen who ever rode. They were so masterful at war and so skillful with their arrows and lances that they stopped the northern drive of colonial Spain from Mexico and halted the French expansion westward from Louisiana. White settlers arriving in Texas from the eastern United States were surprised to find the frontier being rolled backward by Comanches incensed by the invasion of their tribal lands.

The war with the Comanches lasted four decades, in effect holding up the development of the new American nation. Gwynne’s exhilarating account delivers a sweeping narrative that encompasses Spanish colonialism, the Civil War, the destruction of the buffalo herds, and the arrival of the railroads, and the amazing story of Cynthia Ann Parker and her son Quanah—a historical feast for anyone interested in how the United States came into being.

Hailed by critics, S. C. Gwynne’s account of these events is meticulously researched, intellectually provocative, and, above all, thrillingly told. Empire of the Summer Moon announces him as a major new writer of American history.

“Truly one of the best books I’ve read is some time. A no holes bared look at the decimation of so many lives in the expansion of the United States west ward and the collision of cultures that resulted in the wars of the High Planes to the Southwest Territories. And the story of the men that not only defined the times but, redefined themselves. Excellently written and informative.”

— Wallace
A Peoples History of the United States: 1492 to Present Audiobook, by Howard Zinn

Author: Howard Zinn

Narrator: Jeff Zinn

Audio Length: @1x speed 34.25 hours
@1.5x speed 22.83 hours
@2x speed 17.13 hours

Overall Rating: 4.32258 out of 54.32258 out of 54.32258 out of 54.32258 out of 54.32258 out of 5

Narrator Rating: 4.75 out of 54.75 out of 54.75 out of 54.75 out of 54.75 out of 5

Story Rating: 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

A People's History of the United States: 1492 to Present Audiobook

THE CLASSIC NATIONAL BESTSELLER

"A wonderful, splendid book—a book that should be read by every American, student or otherwise, who wants to understand his country, its true history, and its hope for the future." –Howard Fast

Historian Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States chronicles American history from the bottom up, throwing out the official narrative taught in schools—with its emphasis on great men in high places—to focus on the street, the home, and the workplace.

Known for its lively, clear prose as well as its scholarly researchit is the only volume to tell America's story from the point of view of—and in the words of—America's women, factory workers, African-Americans, Native Americans, the working poor, and immigrant laborers. As Zinn shows, many of our country's greatest battles—the fights for a fair wage, an eight-hour workday, child-labor laws, health and safety standards, universal suffrage, women's rights, racial equality—were carried out at the grassroots level, against bloody resistance.

Covering Christopher Columbus's arrival through President Clinton's first term, A People's History of the United States features insightful analysis of the most important events in our history. This edition also includes an introduction by Anthony Arnove, who wrote, directed, and produced The People Speak with Zinn and who coauthored, with Zinn, Voices of a People’s History of the United States.

“Love this book. It provides an amazing perspective on the history of the United States from the point of view of wthe downtrodden and abused. The saying that the winners write the history isn't quite so accurate anymore. It is a great read for an additional perspective on our history.”

— Scott
Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption Audiobook, by Laura Hillenbrand

Author: Laura Hillenbrand

Narrator: Edward Herrmann

Audio Length: @1x speed 14.00 hours
@1.5x speed 9.33 hours
@2x speed 7.00 hours

Overall Rating: 4.263157 out of 54.263157 out of 54.263157 out of 54.263157 out of 54.263157 out of 5

Narrator Rating: 4.5 out of 54.5 out of 54.5 out of 54.5 out of 54.5 out of 5

Story Rating: 4.5 out of 54.5 out of 54.5 out of 54.5 out of 54.5 out of 5

Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption Audiobook

On a spring afternoon in 1943, a US Army Air Forces bomber crash landed and disappeared into the Pacific Ocean, leaving only fragments of the plane visible on the surface, along with gasoline, oil and blood.

Then, a man appeared among the debris. It was the plane's bombardier, a young lieutenant, struggling to pull himself aboard a life raft. One of the most remarkable journeys of World War II was about to begin.

The bombardier was Louis Zamperini. As a boy, he had been a crafty and unapologetic hooligan, burglarizing houses, and leaving home to ride the rails. When he harnessed his energy into running, he discovered a dormant talent that took him all the way to the 1936 Olympics in Berlin. With the arrival of World War II, he became a pilot and began the journey that would lead him to his ill-fated flight and set him adrift at sea on a tiny life raft.

In the open ocean, Lt. Zamperini faced starvation, thirst, enemy aircraft and jumping sharks. Pushed to the limit of his considerable endurance, he met desperation with resourcefulness, brutality with defiance, hardship with brave determination. His very survival depended on his eroding resolve.

In Time's top book of 2010 and #1 New York Times bestseller, Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption, Laura Hillenbrand employs the same eye jeweler's eye for detail and vivid, rich narrative voice that she displayed in her acclaimed 2001 bestseller, Seabiscuit. Unbroken tells the extraordinary tale of a man's odyssey into extremity, and stands testament to the power of human resilience.

“This book is why they made a 5-star rating: something that changes the way you see and move through the world, something you will remember forever, something you are so appreciative you were able to be a part of. Wow. Freaking AMAZING story, brilliant writing, simply incredible...”

— Laurie
Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race Audiobook, by Margot Lee Shetterly

Author: Margot Lee Shetterly

Narrator: Robin Miles

Audio Length: @1x speed 10.75 hours
@1.5x speed 7.17 hours
@2x speed 5.38 hours

Overall Rating: 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

Narrator Rating: 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

Story Rating: 3.333333 out of 53.333333 out of 53.333333 out of 53.333333 out of 53.333333 out of 5

Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race Audiobook

The phenomenal true story of the black female mathematicians at NASA whose calculations helped fuel some of America’s greatest achievements in space. Soon to be a major motion picture starring Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, Janelle Monae, Kirsten Dunst, and Kevin Costner.

Before John Glenn orbited the earth, or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space.

Among these problem-solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some of the brightest minds of their generation. Originally relegated to teaching math in the South’s segregated public schools, they were called into service during the labor shortages of World War II, when America’s aeronautics industry was in dire need of anyone who had the right stuff. Suddenly, these overlooked math whizzes had a shot at jobs worthy of their skills, and they answered Uncle Sam’s call, moving to Hampton, Virginia and the fascinating, high-energy world of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory.

Even as Virginia’s Jim Crow laws required them to be segregated from their white counterparts, the women of Langley’s all-black “West Computing” group helped America achieve one of the things it desired most: a decisive victory over the Soviet Union in the Cold War, and complete domination of the heavens.

Starting in World War II and moving through to the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement and the Space Race, Hidden Figures follows the interwoven accounts of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson and Christine Darden, four African American women who participated in some of NASA’s greatest successes. It chronicles their careers over nearly three decades they faced challenges, forged alliances and used their intellect to change their own lives, and their country’s future.

“Here is another reminder that the fabric of our country is intertwined in the hands of so many minority groups. So proud of the knowledge, competitive and brilliant minds of a forgotten group of African American women. This book touches on the difficulties facing these women during a time when little thought was given to segregated signs for drinking water, eating and going to bathroom. Head held high, supporting each other and facing obstacles with grace could easily be the motto of Hidden Figures”

— Gaye
Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies Audiobook, by Jared Diamond

Author: Jared Diamond

Narrator: Doug Ordunio

Audio Length: @1x speed 16.25 hours
@1.5x speed 10.83 hours
@2x speed 8.13 hours

Overall Rating: 4.129032 out of 54.129032 out of 54.129032 out of 54.129032 out of 54.129032 out of 5

Narrator Rating: 3.666666 out of 53.666666 out of 53.666666 out of 53.666666 out of 53.666666 out of 5

Story Rating: 3.666666 out of 53.666666 out of 53.666666 out of 53.666666 out of 53.666666 out of 5

Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies Audiobook

Why did Eurasians conquer, displace, or decimate Native Americans, Australians, and Africans, instead of the reverse? Evolutionary biologist Jared Diamond stunningly dismantles racially based theories of human history by revealing the environmental factors actually responsible for history’s broadest patterns.

The story begins 13,000 years ago, when Stone Age hunter-gatherers constituted the entire human population. Around that time, the paths of development of human societies on different continents began to diverge greatly. Early domestication of wild plants and animals in the Fertile Crescent, China, Mesoamerica, the Andes, and other areas gave peoples of those regions a head start. Only societies that advanced beyond the hunter-gatherer stage acquired a potential for developing writing, technology, government, and organized religions—as well as those nasty germs and potent weapons of war. It was those societies, that expanded to new homelands at the expense of other peoples. The most familiar examples involve the conquest of non-European peoples by Europeans in the last 500 years, beginning with voyages in search of precious metals and spices, and often leading to invasion of native lands and decimation of native inhabitants.

“One of the best books that Ive ever read! Finally we have an explanation of how different societies and cultures evolved and to what level, based on their environment and resources at hand, rather than some racist polemic. Its amazing how much geography is destiny, and how what you have in terms of livestock and plants is such a crucial factor. One comes away from reading this book realizing that every society is in the end, an adaptation to whatever they had at their disposal.”

— Laurence
Martin Luther: The Man Who Rediscovered God and Changed the World Audiobook, by Eric Metaxas

Author: Eric Metaxas

Narrator: Eric Metaxas

Audio Length: @1x speed 20.75 hours
@1.5x speed 13.83 hours
@2x speed 10.38 hours

Martin Luther: The Man Who Rediscovered God and Changed the World Audiobook

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

“Metaxas is a scrupulous chronicler and has an eye for a good story. . . . full, instructive, and pacey.” —The Washington Post

From #1 New York Times bestselling author Eric Metaxas comes a brilliant and inspiring biography of the most influential man in modern history, Martin Luther, in time for the 500th anniversary of the Reformation


 

On All Hallow’s Eve in 1517, a young monk named Martin Luther posted a document he hoped would spark an academic debate, but that instead ignited a conflagration that would forever destroy the world he knew. Five hundred years after Luther’s now famous Ninety-five Theses appeared, Eric Metaxas, acclaimed biographer of the bestselling Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy and Amazing Grace: William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery, paints a startling portrait of the wild figure whose adamantine faith cracked the edifice of Western Christendom and dragged medieval Europe into the future. Written in riveting prose and impeccably researched, Martin Luther tells the searing tale of a humble man who, by bringing ugly truths to the highest seats of power, caused the explosion whose sound is still ringing in our ears. Luther’s monumental faith and courage gave birth to the ideals of liberty, equality, and individualism that today lie at the heart of all modern life.

“A meticulously researched and detailed account of Luther’s life and times . . . a very human portrait. . . . Metaxas is a scrupulous chronicler and has an eye for a good story. The result is full, instructive, and pacey.”

— The Washington Post
The Escape Artist: The Man Who Broke Out of Auschwitz to Warn the World Audiobook, by Jonathan Freedland

Author: Jonathan Freedland

Narrator: Jonathan Freedland

Audio Length: @1x speed 11.75 hours
@1.5x speed 7.83 hours
@2x speed 5.88 hours

The Escape Artist: The Man Who Broke Out of Auschwitz to Warn the World Audiobook

Winner of the National Jewish Book Award · New York Times Bestseller

"A brilliant and heart-wrenching book, with universal and timely lessons about the power of informationand misinformation. Is it possible to stop mass murder by telling the truth?" — Yuval Noah Harari, bestselling author of Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind and Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow

A complex hero. A forgotten story. The first witness to reveal the full truth of the Holocaust . . .

Award-winning journalist and bestselling novelist Jonathan Freedland tells the astonishing true story of Rudolf Vrba, the man who broke out of Auschwitz to warn the world of a truth too few were willing to hear.

In April 1944, Rudolf Vrba became one of the very first Jews to escape from Auschwitz and make his way to freedom—among only a tiny handful who ever pulled off that near-impossible feat. He did it to reveal the truth of the death camp to the world—and to warn the last Jews of Europe what fate awaited them. Against all odds, Vrba and his fellow escapee, Fred Wetzler, climbed mountains, crossed rivers, and narrowly missed German bullets until they had smuggled out the first full account of Auschwitz the world had ever seen—a forensically detailed report that eventually reached Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and the Pope.

And yet too few heeded the warning that Vrba had risked everything to deliver. Though Vrba helped save two hundred thousand Jewish lives, he never stopped believing it could have been so many more.

This is the story of a brilliant yet troubled man—a gifted “escape artist” who, even as a teenager, understood that the difference between truth and lies can be the difference between life and death. Rudolf Vrba deserves to take his place alongside Anne Frank, Oskar Schindler, and Primo Levi as one of the handful of individuals whose stories define our understanding of the Holocaust.

“I thought I knew the Auschwitz story, but Freedland retells it from a fresh angle so powerfully that I read it with my heart beating fast, full of horror, rage, despair—and admiration for this potent demonstration of the stubborn resilience of the human spirit. ”

— Tracy Chevalier, New York Times bestselling author
Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of Americas Vietnam Audiobook, by Fredrik Logevall

Author: Fredrik Logevall

Narrator: Fred Sanders

Audio Length: @1x speed 32.25 hours
@1.5x speed 21.50 hours
@2x speed 16.13 hours

Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam Audiobook

WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE   Written with the style of a great novelist and the intrigue of a Cold War thriller, Embers of War is a landmark work that will forever change your understanding of how and why America went to war in Vietnam. Tapping newly accessible diplomatic archives in several nations, Fredrik Logevall traces the path that led two Western nations to tragically lose their way in the jungles of Southeast Asia. He brings to life the bloodiest battles of France’s final years in Indochina—and shows how, from an early point, a succession of American leaders made disastrous policy choices that put America on its own collision course with history. An epic story of wasted opportunities and deadly miscalculations, Embers of War delves deep into the historical record to provide hard answers to the unanswered questions surrounding the demise of one Western power in Vietnam and the arrival of another. Eye-opening and compulsively readable, Embers of War is a gripping, heralded work that illuminates the hidden history of the French and American experiences in Vietnam.   ONE OF THE MOST ACCLAIMED WORKS OF HISTORY IN RECENT YEARS Winner of the Francis Parkman Prize from the Society of American Historians • Winner of the American Library in Paris Book Award • Winner of the Council on Foreign Relations Arthur Ross Book Award • Finalist for the Cundill Prize in Historical Literature   NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The Washington Post • The Christian Science Monitor • The Globe and Mail   “A balanced, deeply researched history of how, as French colonial rule faltered, a succession of American leaders moved step by step down a road toward full-blown war.”—Pulitzer Prize citation   “This extraordinary work of modern history combines powerful narrative thrust, deep scholarly authority, and quiet interpretive confidence.”—Francis Parkman Prize citation   “A monumental history . . . a widely researched and eloquently written account of how the U.S. came to be involved in Vietnam . . . certainly the most comprehensive review of this period to date.”The Wall Street Journal   “Superb . . . a product of formidable international research.”The Washington Post   “Lucid and vivid . . . [a] definitive history.”San Francisco Chronicle   “An essential work for those seeking to understand the worst foreign-policy adventure in American history . . . Even though readers know how the story ends—as with The Iliad—they will be as riveted by the tale as if they were hearing it for the first time.”The Christian Science Monitor

“The definitive history of the critical formative period from 1940 to 1960 [in Vietnam]. . . . lucid and vivid . . . As American involvement escalated, Bernard Fall, the highly respected scholar-journalist of Vietnam’s wars, wrote that Americans were ‘dreaming different dreams than the French but walking in the same footsteps.’ Fredrik Logevall brilliantly explains that legacy.”

— Gary R. Hess, San Francisco Chronicle

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