Download The Talent Code: Greatness Isn't Born. It's Grown. Here's How. Audiobook

The Talent Code: Greatness Isnt Born. Its Grown. Heres How. Audiobook, by Daniel Coyle Extended Sample Click for printable size audiobook cover
Author: Daniel Coyle Narrator: John Farrell Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2019 ISBN: 9780593171004
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (2,625 ratings) (rate this audio book)
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What is the secret of talent? How do we unlock it? This groundbreaking work provides readers with tools they can use to maximize potential in themselves and others.

Whether you’re coaching soccer or teaching a child to play the piano, writing a novel or trying to improve your golf swing, this revolutionary book shows you how to grow talent by tapping into a newly discovered brain mechanism.

Drawing on cutting-edge neurology and firsthand research gathered on journeys to nine of the world’s talent hotbeds—from the baseball fields of the Caribbean to a classical-music academy in upstate New York—Coyle identifies the three key elements that will allow you to develop your gifts and optimize your performance in sports, art, music, math, or just about anything.

• Deep Practice Everyone knows that practice is a key to success. What everyone doesn’t know is that specific kinds of practice can increase skill up to ten times faster than conventional practice.

• Ignition We all need a little motivation to get started. But what separates truly high achievers from the rest of the pack? A higher level of commitment—call it passion—born out of our deepest unconscious desires and triggered by certain primal cues. Understanding how these signals work can help you ignite passion and catalyze skill development.

• Master Coaching What are the secrets of the world’s most effective teachers, trainers, and coaches? Discover the four virtues that enable these “talent whisperers” to fuel passion, inspire deep practice, and bring out the best in their students.

These three elements work together within your brain to form myelin, a microscopic neural substance that adds vast amounts of speed and accuracy to your movements and thoughts. Scientists have discovered that myelin might just be the holy grail: the foundation of all forms of greatness, from Michelangelo’s to Michael Jordan’s. The good news about myelin is that it isn’t fixed at birth; to the contrary, it grows, and like anything that grows, it can be cultivated and nourished.

Combining revelatory analysis with illuminating examples of regular people who have achieved greatness, this book will not only change the way you think about talent, but equip you to reach your own highest potential.

Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • I only wish I'd never before used the words 'breakthrough' or 'breathtaking' or 'magisterial' or 'stunning achievement' or 'your world will never be the same after you read this book.' Then I could be using them for the first and only time as I describe my reaction to Daniel Coyle's The Talent Code. I am even willing to 'guarantee' that you will not read a more important and useful book in 2009, or pretty much any other year. And if all that's not enough, it's also 'a helluva good read.' Tom Peters, author of In Search of Excellence"This is a remarkable—even inspiring—book. Daniel Coyle has woven observations from brain research, behavioral research, and real-world training into a conceptual tapestry of genuine importance. What emerges is both a testament to the remarkable potential we all have to learn and perform and an indictment of any idea that our individual capacities and limitations are fixed at birth.

Listener Reviews

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  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shane | 9/6/2017

    " I enjoyed listening to this audiobook. Being in my mid 40's, I grew up around a lot of elders that believed Talent in most areas of life was something that you were either born with or did not have. The studies discussed in this book should give everyone hope that the old way of thinking is not the case .... In addition, there are techniques that can help you get started on the right track. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Susie | 5/17/2016

    " I loved the book and enjoyed every little detail of it. I recommend it to everyone. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Pooneh | 2/16/2014

    " A very important message! I don't like Coyle's writing style but enjoyed the book. Very well structured. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kathy | 2/7/2014

    " There was nothing new to me in this book--and I've been retired from education for 4 years! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Vicki | 2/4/2014

    " This is a very good book and one that I would read as a follow up to Outliers. There are quite a few books on the science of talent and many of them quote the same things. This is a good book - a tad longer than some of the other ones I've read. If you want to nurture students and children and have a little time to read it, it is a good read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Adam | 1/20/2014

    " Fantastic Book!! Totally transformed my perspective about learning, sports, the brain, failure/struggle, and more! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Devon | 1/19/2014

    " I really enjoyed this book. It was very illuminating. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 William | 1/19/2014

    " Useful book. Skill is something you can improve, not just something you're born with. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tim | 1/8/2014

    " A nuts-and-bolts look at how talent can come together in an individual. I read Coyle's book about Lance Armstrong several years. This is a departure for him but very well done. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Srosch | 12/29/2013

    " We are always asking what we can do better. As a teacher then a coach I was constantly honing how I dealt with every teacher every minute of every interaction. This book is going to play an impact the second I am back at work and dealing with anyone! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kathleen | 12/28/2013

    " interesting. I've watched this phenomenon unfold with my young daughter as she learns. Now... how NOT to lose this!? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jessica | 12/21/2013

    " A bit like Outliers, and didn't tell my much I didn't know (well, I didn't know about myelin, but I knew the idea of it), but I enjoyed it. I want to use it to talk about how and why we create the culture we do at our school with new staff. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Frances | 12/14/2013

    " The phrase "Practice makes perfect" has been scientifically proven to be true. Make that "Deep practice".... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shawn | 11/19/2013

    " Fantastic, I love the explanation of how we create circuits to solve problems, and the disassociation of genius from greatness. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Janet | 9/9/2013

    " it was a thoughtful read especially as a parent trying to get children to practice anything, piano or hockey shots or doing homework I learned a great deal, now if I could figure out how to tranpose that into talented children I could sit back and let them look after me! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Patti | 7/26/2013

    " A book I read while on vacation from work. Some great learnings to be had from this book. For this type of book a real page turner. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jeffrey | 5/22/2013

    " Terrific book on how excellence is achieved. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Niels | 11/22/2012

    " Beats "Bounce" by A MILE. I really enjoy the recent studies into how talent is built, maintained and developed. This book makes me want to read more - and surely develop my coaching skills. Superb read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jeremy | 6/21/2012

    " There is so much more to learn about how we as humans learn. This book not only answers questions but gives great examples of how different teachers use "deliberate practice." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jeff | 3/29/2012

    " Best book I have read on developing your talents "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Natalie | 2/18/2012

    " Gives me a lot to think about practicing and perfecting a sport - my riding instructor encouraged me to read it and much of what was discussed are aspects that we discuss in terms of riding. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kevin | 12/23/2011

    " Want to develop a talent? This book describes the science of how it's done -- building a substance in the brain called myelin through persistent practice. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sebastian | 6/24/2011

    " This book changed my life. At one time I thought intelligence and talent was a fixed attribute! This is the scientific proof that it is not. Well written and captivating examples show what it is that makes someone a success. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kristin | 6/20/2011

    " Completely loved it. This is the newest book I'll be recommending to everyone. Reminded me of Malcolm Gladwell's writing. Changed my perspective on developing talents & skills in general. Will definitely impact how we raise our kids. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shawn | 6/12/2011

    " Fantastic, I love the explanation of how we create circuits to solve problems, and the disassociation of genius from greatness. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brad | 5/21/2011

    " The quote by Tom Peters on the dust jacket says in all, "I'm willing to guarantee that you will not read a more important and useful book in this or any other year." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 5/9/2011

    " I really enjoyed this book, a must for anyone struggling to learn ANYTHING. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Felicityn | 5/7/2011

    " Talent is not God-given. It is the result of coaching and deep practice. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Megan | 5/2/2011

    " Thoroughly enjoyed this book -- as a coach, it helps me tap the inner athlete in everyone. Then they write their own successes! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brian | 4/18/2011

    " Should, and has effected my coaching. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Allysworld | 3/8/2011

    " Really awesome book!
    A malcolm gladwell kinda awesome book! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Qi | 2/26/2011

    " In terms of motivational books, this one is not too glib or trivial to re-read once in a while. Talents are not made (at least not often) but sparkled by a igniting fire and thousands of hours of training. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gennifer | 2/16/2011

    " The book was very interesting. I loved it. It was a little repetitive, but overall a great book! "

About the Author

Daniel Coyle wrote the New York Times bestseller Lance Armstrong’s War and Hardball: A Season in the Projects. A contributing editor of Outside magazine, he lives with his wife and four children in Homer, Alaska.