Extended Audio Sample

Download The Death of Ivan Ilych Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Death of Ivan Ilych (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Leo Tolstoy
4.3 out of 54.3 out of 54.3 out of 54.3 out of 54.3 out of 5 4.30 (30 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Leo Tolstoy Narrator: Walter Zimmerman Publisher: Jimcin Recordings Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: November 2007 ISBN:
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This short but powerful novel was acclaimed by Vladimir Nabokov and Mahatma Gandhi as the greatest in the whole of Russian literature. It is one of Tolstoy's most celebrated pieces of late fiction. At the center of the story is an examination of the nature of both life and death and how man can come to terms with death's inevitability. It was widely acclaimed when it was published in 1886 and remains a compelling narrative today.

The Death of Ivan Illyich is a small book with singular depth of insight and is considered to be one of the great explorations of death and dying in all of Western literature. No author in so few words summons so many emotions.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ariel | 2/19/2014

    " A look at a man's life and his death. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ally | 2/15/2014

    " Short, interesting read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Summer | 2/10/2014

    " This book set my life on its current course. After reading it in college, I was determined to live a life of purpose and fulfillment. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Liz Bromley | 1/23/2014

    " This is one of my favorite short stories/novellas. Also a very good intro to Tolstoy if you are interested in him. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gerardo | 1/16/2014

    " One of the main things that this book has highlighted is the physical and personal pain that Ivan has to suffer. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Beth | 1/12/2014

    " WOW! This book will be relevant as long as people live and die. One of the books that has changed my life. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Isabel | 1/11/2014

    " Brilliant! Shows you that material wealth isn't king. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Robin Benowitz | 1/11/2014

    " My first half of undergrad was spent in New Jersey. I have very little recollection of those years. What I do remember, very fondly, were the Russian Literature I, II and III courses I took. If you haven't read the Russian masters I strongly recommend you start with Tolstoy or Dostoevsky. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Paul | 12/3/2013

    " Only two things are certain, death and taxes... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lauren Gonzalez | 11/26/2013

    " one of my favorite books. short, but makes you really think about your life. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Wendy | 11/21/2013

    " This is just one of those stories that hit me just right at a certain in my life. About a man finally getting to the "real" stuff in life while everyone around him is still living in the superficialness of life. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Belle Nicole | 10/18/2013

    " Interesting read - had to do it for college lit class. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cris | 9/10/2013

    " Um mestre! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brian | 6/25/2013

    " Since I consider myself a Christian Anarchist, I suppose I should read Tolstoy, since he is labeled one as well. This book was brilliant. He threads so many Christian concepts into a single story made more honest than an autobiography. Fantastic. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Janet | 3/24/2013

    " Read this for one of my Master in Nursing classes which made it more interesting because of the required analysis. Otherwise, I probably would not have thought about life and death as much. Where is Palliative Care and Hospice? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Conan734 | 3/6/2013

    " Is it strange to say this book made it easy to think of my own passing? Profound is a word used too often, but when it fits it fits. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Walker | 11/7/2012

    " If ever a piece of fiction validated the notion that life without death would be meaningless (and I use that word deliberately for all of its suggestive nuances), that work is Tolstoy's concise and potent accounting of the life and death of one Ivan Ilyich. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kathryn Lance | 9/25/2012

    " Excellent, and especially relevant to someone my age. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ke Huang | 6/25/2011

    " Maybe it is me, but I found this story too slow and melodramatic. However, that tone could be the intention of the writer, in order to show how miserable Ilyich's life is. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cassidy | 5/29/2011

    " so moving. no need to say more, just wonderful. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ctb | 5/17/2011

    " Long short story or novella. My freshman lit project. Enjoyed every sentence. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 4/25/2011

    " Very well written short story and pretty sad "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kareef | 4/20/2011

    " First work by Tolstoy that I have read and already it has cemented his undeniable genius. The depth of characterization is incredible you'd be humbled and crushed immensely if you have ambitions of being a writer. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eric | 4/18/2011

    " I can safely say this book changed my life. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joanne | 3/28/2011

    " This was an interesting book on the process of one man's death. did make me want to read more of Tolstoy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Trae Noël | 3/25/2011

    " What is death? Why do we live? You can see Tolstoy wrestle with death in this book. A great read! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cheryl | 3/23/2011

    " Spend time with a timeless author and Ivan Ilych, a human being dealing with the discontinuity of life when all he's known is the sameness. If you are able to put aside resistences to the subject of death, you will find much to identify with and think about long after the end. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Eliana | 3/21/2011

    " It took a long, long time to die. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Andrew | 3/18/2011

    " Don't read the introduction before the book; it could ruin it. On the other hand, without a little knowledge of Tolstoy, I'd say all but the last pages are boring (sorry, Beth). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lynette | 3/18/2011

    " The paradox in this book is heartwrenching. It's a short story, so it's difficult to review without giving spoilers. My favorite Tolstoy. "

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About the Author
Author Leo Tolstoy

Leo Tolstoy (1828–1910) was born about two hundred miles from Moscow. His mother died when he was two, his father when he was nine. His parents were of noble birth, and Tolstoy remained acutely aware of his aristocratic roots, even when he later embraced doctrines of equality and the brotherhood of man. After serving in the army in the Caucasus and Crimea, where he wrote his first stories, he traveled and studied educational theories. In 1862 he married Sophia Behrs and for the next fifteen years lived a tranquil, productive life, finishing War and Peace in 1869 and Anna Karenina in 1877. In 1879 he underwent a spiritual crisis; he sought to propagate his beliefs on faith, morality, and nonviolence, writing mostly parables, tracts, and morality plays. Tolstoy died of pneumonia in 1910 at the age of eighty-two.