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Download Tolstoy: The Death of Ivan Ilyich & Master and Man Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Tolstoy: The Death of Ivan Ilyich & Master and Man (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Leo Tolstoy
3.91 out of 53.91 out of 53.91 out of 53.91 out of 53.91 out of 5 3.91 (23 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Leo Tolstoy Narrator: Simon Vance Publisher: christianaudio.com Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: January 2009 ISBN:
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In these two famous short novels, Leo Tolstoy takes readers to the brink of despair. At the end of life, worldly ambition offers no consolation for the spiritually empty soul, but Tolstoy is the master of themes and redemption. He turns his morbid topic into hope, leading toward spiritual awakening. Tolstoy offers his readers a lifetime of perspective on death.

Tolstoy's The Death of Ivan Ilyich is a small book with singular depth of insight. The book was published in 1886, breaking a nine-year literary silence after the publication of Anna Karenina. It is considered to be one of the great explorations of death and dying in all of Western Literature. No author in so few words summons so many emotions into the reader's soul. This masterpiece has been paired here with another of Tolstoy's short novels, Master and Man, which too examnes the human response to mortality. Together these two stories will ultimately offer encouragement to the spiritually hungry. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Angie | 12/21/2013

    " I'm pretty ambivalent about this one. It's short and easy to read but I didn't really connect in any significant way. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jennyreadsexcessively | 7/21/2013

    " 2 short stories of facing death, Ivan Ilyich suffers and seeks solice in first, liked 2nd better-- snowstorm strands rich landowner and peasant "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 A.S. Peterson | 1/4/2013

    " Great short story. Amazing how something written over 100 years ago can be so completely contemporary. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joe | 12/16/2012

    " i know he is a titan, but not a huge fan. he is far more depressing that dostoevsky. and his theology is whacked "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 MountainPoet | 12/12/2012

    " Master and Man is by far my favorite Tolstoy short story. Death of Ivan Ilyich is right up there as well. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joe | 12/10/2012

    " "It could only be explained if one could say I hadn't lived as I should. But that is quite inadmissable.", he said to himself, remembering his law-abiding, correct, and proper life. "To accept that would be quite impossible," he said to himself... "There is no explanation!" "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Laura | 9/3/2012

    " I read the story of "Master and Man" within this compilation. It was a powerful and moving story of man's assumptions about power and what really matters in life. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amy | 11/13/2011

    " Only read Death of Ivan Ilyich "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Shauna | 10/16/2011

    " Book club selection that I really didn't like. We only read Ivan Ilyich but the depression was overwhelming as I read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Daniel | 7/8/2011

    " A story of the ultimate sacrifice. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Timm DiStefano | 6/20/2011

    " Might have fit me more in high school but is too dark for me right now. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Denise | 5/30/2011

    " Good introduction to Leo Tolstoy. Felt almost like a prequel to "Anna Karenina" at times, but that is due to the time period, class and location of the novel. Another good book to get you thinking about how you want to live -- maybe before you are on your deathbed. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 T Sager | 5/18/2011

    " Tolstoy lays out our lives. Reading this book made me not want to waste any moment of the rest of my life. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ctb | 5/17/2011

    " Long short story or novella. My freshman lit project. Enjoyed every sentence. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 4/25/2011

    " Very well written short story and pretty sad "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kareef | 4/20/2011

    " First work by Tolstoy that I have read and already it has cemented his undeniable genius. The depth of characterization is incredible you'd be humbled and crushed immensely if you have ambitions of being a writer. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eric | 4/18/2011

    " I can safely say this book changed my life. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joanne | 3/28/2011

    " This was an interesting book on the process of one man's death. did make me want to read more of Tolstoy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Trae Noël | 3/25/2011

    " What is death? Why do we live? You can see Tolstoy wrestle with death in this book. A great read! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cheryl | 3/23/2011

    " Spend time with a timeless author and Ivan Ilych, a human being dealing with the discontinuity of life when all he's known is the sameness. If you are able to put aside resistences to the subject of death, you will find much to identify with and think about long after the end. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Eliana | 3/21/2011

    " It took a long, long time to die. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Andrew | 3/18/2011

    " Don't read the introduction before the book; it could ruin it. On the other hand, without a little knowledge of Tolstoy, I'd say all but the last pages are boring (sorry, Beth). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lynette | 3/18/2011

    " The paradox in this book is heartwrenching. It's a short story, so it's difficult to review without giving spoilers. My favorite Tolstoy. "

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About the Author
Author Leo Tolstoy

Leo Tolstoy (1828–1910) was born about two hundred miles from Moscow. His mother died when he was two, his father when he was nine. His parents were of noble birth, and Tolstoy remained acutely aware of his aristocratic roots, even when he later embraced doctrines of equality and the brotherhood of man. After serving in the army in the Caucasus and Crimea, where he wrote his first stories, he traveled and studied educational theories. In 1862 he married Sophia Behrs and for the next fifteen years lived a tranquil, productive life, finishing War and Peace in 1869 and Anna Karenina in 1877. In 1879 he underwent a spiritual crisis; he sought to propagate his beliefs on faith, morality, and nonviolence, writing mostly parables, tracts, and morality plays. Tolstoy died of pneumonia in 1910 at the age of eighty-two.

About the Narrator

Simon Vance (a.k.a. Robert Whitfield) is an award-winning actor and an AudioFile Golden Voice with over forty Earphones Awards. He has won thirteen prestigious Audie Awards and was Booklist’s very first Voice of Choice in 2008. He has narrated more than eight hundred audiobooks over almost thirty years, beginning when he was a radio newsreader for the BBC in London.