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Download Resurrection Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Resurrection (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Leo Tolstoy
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (4,540 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Leo Tolstoy Narrator: Simon Vance Publisher: christianaudio.com Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: January 2009 ISBN:
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Leo Tolstoy stands tall among the great Russian novelists of the 19th century. Tolstoy based Resurrection, the last of his novels, on a true story of a philanderer whose misuse of a beautiful young orphan girl leads to her ruin. Fate brings the two together many years later, and the meeting awakens the man's moral conscience. Anger, intimacy, forgiveness, and grace result.

While the situation of Tolstoy's plot is alien to most people, his nuanced treatment of mortal life is familiar to all. Later in his life Tolstoy confessed that he earlier had seduced two young girls for his pleasure. Perhaps his own deeds and their horrible consequences motivated him to write this novel with special passion. It is a particularly moving tale.

Tolstoy's Resurrection is marvelous in the fullest sense of the word - a story so improbable that it must be a miraculous achievement. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lysergius | 2/14/2014

    " Read this over 40 years ago, Its as relevant now as it was to me then.. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Peyton | 2/14/2014

    " Good political commentaries entwine their messages seamlessly with their plots. This is not one of them. Tolstoy's four hundred page sermon has some lovely prose, but he hides it well. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Pedro | 2/11/2014

    " This book is amazing. Everyone should read it. Tolstoi left us a message, a message of peace and harmony between all humans. He show us how easy is to make it, and how hard. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Annelida | 2/9/2014

    " This is an incredible depiction of life in late 19th century Russia, from all its angles. Tolstoy's ideologies of religion and society are rather interesting, and are brought out in this novel magnificently. I would recommend this novel to anyone who's ever questioned religion, society, law - government! Humanity... this novel raises outstanding inquiry in these topics, thus provoking thought and even a better, sort of anarchistic, outlook towards life...if you don't mind it, that is. I definitely don't. This book is indeed a work of life, as well as art! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gary | 1/27/2014

    " They don't write social commentary like they used to. Tolstoy's complaints with corruption and the prison system seem equally relevant today. An interesting book to read - although the story itself falls short of his more famous stories - War & Peace and Anna Karenina. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jennifer Whitmill | 1/26/2014

    " I think that while I agree with much of tolstoy's view of humanity, I do not at all agree with his view if poverty and the poor. Therefore, this book was a little challenging. But also well written, so 4 stars for you. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lee Margaret | 1/21/2014

    " This is one of Leo Tolstoy's shorter books. I read this with my bookclub and really enjoyed reading this because of the story and the setting in the Siberia (Russia). It goes into the lives of the character and the folks surrounding her on the journey to Siberia. I learned a lot about the prison system and what the prisoners had to go through. It's an interesting reading experience. I definitely recommend this classic memorable book to all older readers. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Ashley | 1/18/2014

    " I was very disappointed with Tolstoy's world view and he doesn't even give the reader the satisfaction of a conclusion to the plot. Worse than both War and Peace and Anna Karenina. A few small gems towards the end (excluding the final chapter), but not enough to justify the book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ed | 1/18/2014

    " Amazingly matter-of fact, simple, direct, frank about the natures of people and society. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joseph Weyek | 1/17/2014

    " I'll have to reread it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Maggie | 1/11/2014

    " first published in 1899, the details of this amazing story explain today's world. human nature does NOT change even as technologies advance at amazing rates. highly recommended for thinking people who care why man's inhumanity to man continues apace yet under disguises. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Salvatore Leone | 12/12/2013

    " A friend, Aubrey, commented that what was irritating about this selection is the "Tolstoy as God" theme running throughout, and I couldn't agree more. Like his writing but not this one particularly. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cristina Bettencourt | 12/11/2013

    " Maybe Tolstoy's best book or maybe I read it in the right age approaching 50, having lived in many countries and learned some about the multitude of cultural perspectives; and after having experienced some different life situations. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ryan Egly | 10/5/2013

    " Wonderful portrait of a member of the nobility who undergoes an inner transformation. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Vera | 8/29/2013

    " My favorite Tolstoy. He does ramble like an old man in this one, though, so I'm sure a lot of people would find it annoying. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Linda | 5/28/2013

    " Part love story, part redemption, and part a searing indictment of Tsarist Russia - written when Tolstoy himself was going through a religious crisis. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Alik | 9/19/2012

    " I would rather have read a finnish translation of this book and learned something. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Meg | 7/18/2012

    " Amazing, underrated work of the great Tolstoy. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 John Hansen | 5/19/2012

    " A yearning, searching tale of loss that finds that redemption for mistakes of the past is never clean. This novel is Tolstoy's greatest, and most realistic look at the human condition. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Iliana | 3/9/2012

    " Great. This was given to me by a friend for Christmas. It's a bit dark, but also is the story of an amazing spiritual journey simultaneously with a reflection of Russian values and history. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 MJ Nicholls | 1/1/2012

    " Ignore the cynics. Tolstoy's novel is a moralistic tale, yes, but the finest you are ever going to read. Life-changing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jennifer | 10/31/2011

    " Thought provoking book. I will have to read it a few more times to really soak it up. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ian Surraville | 7/1/2011

    " This is the single most influential book from my childhood. I was 8 at the time when I picked up this book from my father's bookstore. I never looked at the world in the same way after this. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mike | 5/22/2011

    " I read the Magarshack translation. A great book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steven | 5/22/2011

    " A very long soap opera. Some parts of the book were page turners, other parts were a drag to get through. Very good author and can display the characters emotions on you with precision, overall not bad. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cissie | 5/19/2011

    " This was the perfect book to read while snowed in for weeks! ( well, snowed in by choice) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Crystal | 5/19/2011

    " This was a long one, but I got attached to the characters. It's a good one. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Heather | 5/18/2011

    " To think I'd have anything to add... Tolstoy is always so deeply, deeply human. And I love him for it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Becky | 5/17/2011

    " Takes a long time, but well worth it! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brenda | 5/16/2011

    " My favorite book ... Ever!
    "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Katinka | 5/13/2011

    " Very impressive book, sad too but the kind of book that stays with you for a while. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Magdad | 5/13/2011

    " Tolstoy writes like nobody else I have ever read. He can describe the simplest or most complex situation or human emotion "eyes and smiles" are what make you fall in love. Anna, Levin, Vronsky, Kitty, Dolly, what unforgettable characters. A great read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sarah | 5/12/2011

    " Beautiful. You can tell Tolstoy cares about his characters, even when they are unlikeable. "

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About the Author
Author Leo Tolstoy

Leo Tolstoy (1828–1910) was born about two hundred miles from Moscow. His mother died when he was two, his father when he was nine. His parents were of noble birth, and Tolstoy remained acutely aware of his aristocratic roots, even when he later embraced doctrines of equality and the brotherhood of man. After serving in the army in the Caucasus and Crimea, where he wrote his first stories, he traveled and studied educational theories. In 1862 he married Sophia Behrs and for the next fifteen years lived a tranquil, productive life, finishing War and Peace in 1869 and Anna Karenina in 1877. In 1879 he underwent a spiritual crisis; he sought to propagate his beliefs on faith, morality, and nonviolence, writing mostly parables, tracts, and morality plays. Tolstoy died of pneumonia in 1910 at the age of eighty-two.

About the Narrator

Simon Vance (a.k.a. Robert Whitfield) is an award-winning actor and an AudioFile Golden Voice with fifty-eight Earphones Awards. He has won thirteen prestigious Audie Awards and was Booklist’s very first Voice of Choice in 2008. He has narrated more than eight hundred audiobooks over almost thirty years, beginning when he was a radio newsreader for the BBC in London.