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Download The Death of Ivan Ilyich: A Leo Tolstoy Short Story Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Death of Ivan Ilyich: A Leo Tolstoy Short Story (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Leo Tolstoy
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (21,194 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Leo Tolstoy Narrator: Bill Dewees Publisher: Simply Magazine Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: June 2011 ISBN:
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The brilliance of this story is in how a normal bureaucrat, a judge in this case, has a small accident that winds up gradually taking his life. As he deals with this incident, with hope at first and then despair, he comes to terms with his family, his life, and the mediocrities that we all suffer with, except for the exceptional few. This story rings a particularly poignant note for those in early middle age facing the next part of their lives. This story is considered Tolstoy's best.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jason | 2/20/2014

    " A moving account of one man's confrontation with death. I think Tolstoy's pace works better in longer works, but he deals with his themes well in this short novella. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Azjericho | 2/19/2014

    " Este libro de verdad es duro, y hace poco lo relei y no me cabia la menor duda de que es un libro que mata en verdad la esperanza, y por eso mismo es tan bueno. Las reflexiones antes de morir siempre han sido puestas en una luz tenue a la que nadie quiere llegar, pero esta historia de un abogado ruso enfrentandose al cese de su existencia es la mejor historia que Tolstoy nos pudo haber dado, Ivan Ilych es el heroe tragico que debate sobre lo artificial y vacia que le parece su vida sintiendo que al final de cuentas todo acabara sin el menor aviso, y es en ese ironico momento que halla la manera autentica de vivir. Un clasico sencillo y corto que ahonda en la conciencia del ser humano sin pretensiones ni adornos, Grande Leo. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gita | 2/18/2014

    " This was a great and really short book which focused less on plot or writing and more on content, more specifically the philosophy of death via a narrative of Ivan Ilyich's last days, hours, and minutes. Very deep and thought-provoking. Concise. My first impression of Tolstoy has been a good one. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laurel | 2/2/2014

    " A beautiful short story about a man's personal anguish and sense of regret as he approaches death and reflects back upon his life. Tolstoy handles this difficult struggle with insight, compassion and humanity. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Hayden | 1/31/2014

    " Tolstoy, from what I've read, has nothing on Dostoevsky! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ron Clark | 1/26/2014

    " Reading this as a freshman in college on the cusp of my life journey, as it were, this book confirmed everything I had come to conclude about life but had not the experience to prove. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kareef | 1/17/2014

    " First work by Tolstoy that I have read and already it has cemented his undeniable genius. The depth of characterization is incredible you'd be humbled and crushed immensely if you have ambitions of being a writer. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Janet | 1/16/2014

    " peasant life in Russia...one man's death may mean another man's good fortune. Actually, I am re-reading it now "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kristi | 1/6/2014

    " Read this for a book discussion group. Found it to be precise, very male, and introspective. Not my favorite. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Diana | 11/12/2013

    " Loving the mood. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Louise | 10/23/2013

    " The Russians know how to write timeless stories. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brigitte | 10/18/2013

    " Superb but slightly depressing as one may wonder what is the point of life "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Angela. | 1/15/2013

    " Not only should this be read by every human being, but it should also be nailed to their bed posts to be the first thing they see when they wake. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sheryl | 11/16/2012

    " Good portrayal of how personal dying is. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Shawn Kass | 11/13/2012

    " Did not care for it. Tolstoy is boring. Maybe if he got back up as a zombie and ate his wife and kid it would have been better, but it still would have been boring. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Colleen | 11/10/2012

    " I haven't been able to get very into much Russian lit. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sam Moss | 10/23/2012

    " Jesus. Made me want to die. Certainly not because it's a bad story. It's incredible of course, even through the translation the absolute angst and hopelessness of Ivan Ilych is portrayed perfectly. Have something happy on hand to read afterwards or you may feel a little pain in the side of your own. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rachel | 9/8/2012

    " Such a fascinating and heartbreaking story. This is why I'm an English major and why I love reading. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Robert | 1/1/2012

    " Awful, horrible rendition, but so rivetting. Enjoyable. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah Olson | 8/15/2011

    " This book might just change the way you live your life. One realizes the importance of a life worth living rather than a life lived 'properly.' Ivan Ilych does not realize this until his deathbed and he regrets it, but dies with this knowledge--giving him a sort of peace. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andrew | 6/2/2011

    " I wish I'd gotten one of the many collections of Tolstoy's novellas rather than just The Death... I would recommend you do so yourself if you're interested in this great Russian writer. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jen | 5/28/2011

    " Amazing. Everyone needs to read this book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ctb | 5/17/2011

    " Long short story or novella. My freshman lit project. Enjoyed every sentence. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 4/25/2011

    " Very well written short story and pretty sad "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kareef | 4/20/2011

    " First work by Tolstoy that I have read and already it has cemented his undeniable genius. The depth of characterization is incredible you'd be humbled and crushed immensely if you have ambitions of being a writer. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eric | 4/18/2011

    " I can safely say this book changed my life. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joanne | 3/28/2011

    " This was an interesting book on the process of one man's death. did make me want to read more of Tolstoy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Trae Noël | 3/25/2011

    " What is death? Why do we live? You can see Tolstoy wrestle with death in this book. A great read! "

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About the Author
Author Leo Tolstoy

Leo Tolstoy (1828–1910) was born about two hundred miles from Moscow. His mother died when he was two, his father when he was nine. His parents were of noble birth, and Tolstoy remained acutely aware of his aristocratic roots, even when he later embraced doctrines of equality and the brotherhood of man. After serving in the army in the Caucasus and Crimea, where he wrote his first stories, he traveled and studied educational theories. In 1862 he married Sophia Behrs and for the next fifteen years lived a tranquil, productive life, finishing War and Peace in 1869 and Anna Karenina in 1877. In 1879 he underwent a spiritual crisis; he sought to propagate his beliefs on faith, morality, and nonviolence, writing mostly parables, tracts, and morality plays. Tolstoy died of pneumonia in 1910 at the age of eighty-two.

About the Narrator

Bill DeWees is a voice actor who has worked extensively in radio, commercials, and audiobook narration. Some of his clients include Lowe’s, Pizza Hut, Whole Foods, and Whirlpool. Among his audiobook narrations are What Makes an Effective Executive by Peter F. Drucker, The Jefferson Lies by David Barton, and Cold-Case Christianity by James Warren Wallace.