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Download Beyond Reason: Using Emotions as You Negotiate Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Beyond Reason: Using Emotions as You Negotiate Audiobook, by Roger Fisher Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (145 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Roger Fisher, Daniel Shapiro Narrator: Roger Fisher, Daniel Shapiro Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2005 ISBN: 9780786555499
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Emotions matter. Whether negotiating with an angry boss or an outraged teenager, emotions can derail you. Properly treated, however, they can help you achieve the results you want. This book shows you how.

In Beyond Reason, you will discover five “core concerns” that motivate people: appreciation, affiliation, autonomy, status, and role. You will learn how to use these core concerns to generate helpful emotions in yourself and in others. Armed with this knowledge, you can gauge the needs of another negotiator, set the emotional tone of discussion, and reach a mutually acceptable agreement.

Beyond Reason clarifies the complicated, “fuzzy” world of emotions and offers straightforward, practical advice. It builds on previous work of the Harvard Negotiation Project, the group that brought you the groundbreaking book Getting to YES. Now, in Beyond Reason, world renowned negotiator Roger Fisher teams up with psychologist Daniel Shapiro, expert on the emotional dimension of negotiation. They show you how to employ emotions to turn a disagreement—big or small, professional or personal—into an opportunity for mutual gain.

Fresh, insightful, and relevant to any interaction, Beyond Reason is certain to become a lasting classic for dealing with anyone from family and friends to colleagues, customers, and employees.

Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tim | 11/26/2013

    " This book changed how I perceive relationships and life in general. I would recommend it to anyone. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Roxanne | 10/6/2013

    " Another reading for class -- this time, for Processes of International Negotiation. The classification of what triggers individuals in conversations was fascinating. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ke Huang | 9/14/2013

    " When I was first assigned to this book, I assumed that it was a treatise against reason. However, the book's thesis is more complicated than that, because it advocates reason and emotion. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Paul Sidwell | 8/24/2013

    " Good business strategy resource. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lianne | 8/20/2012

    " Very educational "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jennifer | 6/3/2012

    " I found this book to be another useful one to read for those interested in conflict resolution. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elaine | 8/23/2011

    " Facinating discussion of how conflicts can be turned into opportunities. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nathan | 7/27/2011

    " Not as good as Getting to Yes but still useful -- particularly the discussion of "core concerns" and the latter section dealing with issues in conflict/negotiation. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nick | 5/18/2011

    " I have the audiobook version of this book. It is hard to keep coming back to since it does not make for an interesting listen, but I am interested in the topic. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 5/2/2011

    " Fills in the big whole of Getting to Yes--emotions in negotiation. In the mediation I do (neighborhood and victim/offender)managing emotions is most of the work. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Beneth | 9/7/2010

    " Helps one learn to use emotions as a tool in negotiating rather than a block to it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kiersten | 8/30/2010

    " This was one was recommended to me "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David Mcmorris | 8/29/2009

    " Enjoyed this book; good insights for dealing with people. It will take time to assimilate the recommended skills. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kiersten | 4/2/2009

    " This was one was recommended to me "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tim | 2/16/2009

    " This book changed how I perceive relationships and life in general. I would recommend it to anyone. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 2/19/2008

    " Fills in the big whole of Getting to Yes--emotions in negotiation. In the mediation I do (neighborhood and victim/offender)managing emotions is most of the work. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elaine | 12/27/2007

    " Facinating discussion of how conflicts can be turned into opportunities. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Beneth | 7/21/2007

    " Helps one learn to use emotions as a tool in negotiating rather than a block to it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nick | 7/17/2007

    " I have the audiobook version of this book. It is hard to keep coming back to since it does not make for an interesting listen, but I am interested in the topic. "

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About the Author

Roger Fisher is a former professor at Harvard Law School and a negotiation and conflict management specialist. He is the author of Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In, Getting Ready to Negotiate, and International Conflict for Beginners. He is a former director of the Harvard Negotiation Project, an initiative to improve the theory and practice of conflict resolution and negotiation by working on real world conflict intervention.