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Extended Audio Sample What’s Wrong with the World Audiobook, by G. K. Chesterton Click for printable size audiobook cover
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (425 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: G. K. Chesterton Narrator: Bernard Mayes Publisher: Blackstone Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2012 ISBN: 9781470834173
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In this important book, G.K. Chesterton offers a remarkably perceptive analysis of social and moral issues, even more relevant today than in his own time. With a light, humorous tone but a deadly serious philosophy, he comments on errors in education, on feminism vs. true womanhood, on the importance of the child, and other issues, using incisive arguments against the trendsetters’ assaults on the common man and the family.

Chesterton possessed the genius to foresee the dangers of implementing modernist proposals. He knew that lax moral standards would lead to the dehumanization of man. In this book, he staunchly defends the family against those ideas and institutions that would subvert it and thereby deliver man into the hands of the servile state. In addressing what is wrong, he also shows clearly what is right, and how to change things in that direction.

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Katrina Best | 2/18/2014

    " I've heard several good things about Chesterton. While this was a fairly decent read, I did not agree with all of his arguments, nor did I feel that he defended them to the best of his ability. I plan to read other works by Chesterton. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Clint | 1/23/2014

    " Facinating approach to gender differences and societal organization. Helps me to understand his opinions regarding democracy much better. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Heath | 1/13/2014

    " If you like reading Chesterton rant about whatever crosses his mind, you'll love this book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gwen Burrow | 12/13/2013

    " Enjoyed this one a lot, even though I didn't always get Chesterton's witty jabs at 19th-century English culture, mostly because I'm not a 19th-century English person. And it was fun to see where some of my favorite GK quotes come from--like "if a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly." "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amy Edwards | 12/8/2013

    " not finished yet, but so far I really like him. He wrote in 1920, but he could eaily be writing about today! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Don Gubler | 9/18/2013

    " Clearly dated, somewhat worthwhile for the historical content and the contrarian mindfulness of the commentary. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kevin Holmes | 8/28/2013

    " I think he may have been incorrect about some differences between men and women. However, he seems spot on regarding modernity. He points out the problems with both Capitalism and Socialism. Soap and Socialism or Beer and Liberty! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cathy | 5/24/2013

    " Absolutley loved it! Incredibly pertinent to today. Look forward to reading it again. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 C. Tilden | 5/11/2013

    " you gotta read this book. you just gotta. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Keith Bell | 3/1/2013

    " Great book of social essays. While many of the ideas are dated there is still much to chew on (especially re: women's suffrage and elitism). Chesterton has a way with words (if not with facts lol). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michael | 11/18/2012

    " this is essentially chesteton's explanation of his distributist leanings, as well as other things concerning england in 1919. while i don't agree with all of it, i can see his reasoning behind it. oddly, it has remained topical. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jeanette | 10/15/2012

    " Some excellently thought-provoking sections that were alarmingly current a century later, and others that were a drag because they were about issues too specific to that time period in England. "

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About the Author

Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874–1936) was born in London. He went on to study art at the Slade School and literature at University College in London. Chesterton wrote a great deal of poetry, as well as works of social and literary criticism. Among his most notable books are The Man Who Was Thursday, a metaphysical thriller, and The Everlasting Man, a history of humankind’s spiritual progress. After his conversion to Catholicism in 1922, Chesterton wrote mainly on religious topics such as in Orthodoxy and Heretics. He is most known for creating the famous priest-detective character Father Brown, who first appeared in The Innocence of Father Brown.

About the Narrator

Bernard Mayes is a teacher, administrator, corporate executive, broadcaster, actor, dramatist, and former international commentator on US culture. He is best known for his readings of historical classics.