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Download The Wealth of Nations Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Wealth of Nations Audiobook, by Adam Smith Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (9,182 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Adam Smith Narrator: Craig Deitschmann Publisher: Knowledge Products Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Related: The Giants of Political Thought Series Release Date: September 2012 ISBN: 9781470825089
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An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations is one of the most important and influential works ever published on economic theory and is the foundation of classical economics. In it, Adam Smith stresses the importance of the division of labor to economic progress. He criticizes the arguments for economic planning and offers a detailed theoretical and historical case for free trade.

In this masterpiece of the eighteenth-century Scottish Enlightenment, Smith develops a theory of social order arising from the unintended consequences of self-interested behavior. This self-regulating system of the free market, Smith contends, protects consumers from entrenched special interests and is usually harmed by government intervention.

Far more than just a work on economic theory, The Wealth of Nations also contains Smiths views on philosophy, history, and political theory.

This program discusses Adam Smith’s general approach to philosophy and how The Wealth of Nations fits into that approach. It also explains Smith’s major arguments and themes. Smith’s sometimes difficult discourse is presented with the background information necessary for its comprehension.

The Giants of Political Thought series is an easy and entertaining way to broaden your mind and your awareness of great ideas.

Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Aaron Rinehart | 2/18/2014

    " Another one of the most difficult reading experiences I have tackled. Adam Smith provides us with a great introduction into the history of modern economics and the political economy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jonathan | 2/7/2014

    " This book is easier to read than to listen to, but I appreciated the opportunity to reinforce some of Smith's major points by listening to this edition during my commute. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Allie | 2/1/2014

    " Classic beginner text for all would-be economists. Very simple to understand. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Nate Markham | 1/26/2014

    " I think Adam Smith is lucky to have been "the first" to write a book on economics such as this. I remember thinking how simple and obvious the work is. Easy to say from inside a culture based around this book i guess. Really not all that great, absurdly heralded as a great work in economics for seemingly political reasons. Near the top of my burn pile. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Victoria | 1/12/2014

    " I read only the last chapter: "Public Debts" for school. It really helped me understand why debt is so harmful to both governments and individuals and how nations get in the huge amounts of un-payable debts they are in now. It was rather depressing, I admit, but very informative. It makes me trust government even less than I did before! : ) It also made me realize that money I spend or pay tax with just goes in an endless circle of chaotic meaninglessness. (Still, as Christians we are told by Jesus to "Give to Caesar what is Caesar's.) Only money I give back to God's kingdom purposes really makes an difference in the context of eternity. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mulhollandj | 1/9/2014

    " It was really interesting to compare how corporations ran everything then and how corporations are running most things today. It was also interesting to see the ways people manipulate the market. Not much has changed. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Daniel Dunn | 1/4/2014

    " This is quite possibly the most boring book I have ever read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 11/27/2013

    " Not the easiest book to read with the subject matter and old English. None the less, after reading this book, one should begin to wrap their head around free market capitalism. The chapters on money supply and banking are incredibly pertinent for today's situation. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amy Boetcher | 11/23/2013

    " Dry to read, but really genius. I'm sure lots of it went over my head, but I appreciated the rest. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 J. M. | 11/10/2013

    " It's a slog, but everyone should read this in college... or as an independent, educated citizen. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hari | 10/19/2013

    " This book is long but everyone should try to read this book before they die. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Melissa | 10/4/2013

    " Not a light or easy read by any means. Great content though. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 William M Tammick III | 9/29/2013

    " An economics classic - it amazed me to see fundamentally sound, lasting, and relevant Adam Smith's theories are. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ahmad Damasanto | 9/22/2013

    " Nyerah baca book 5. Lanjut lagi nanti. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Geoff | 9/11/2013

    " A must for anyone with a professed interest in Capitalism. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ming | 6/25/2013

    " what's there to say? Any man who calls himself a businessman or an economist should read this. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Abdul Alsheddi | 6/12/2013

    " As an Economics student, I felt obliged to read this economic masterpiece (in my spare time). The book is too long and not all the chapters are worth reading. Honestly, I skimmed most chapters and only focused on the ones deemed important in grasping his ideas. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Fredrick Danysh | 6/10/2013

    " Adam Smith's classical tect on international economy. Makes economic systems easier to comprehend "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Eric Roberts | 4/1/2013

    " Adam Smith may have been an economics genius, but he cannot write worth a damn. This book droned on and on and on...I had to force myself to keep reading. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joe Malicki | 3/31/2013

    " Quoting Adam Smith to shoot down Republican policy proposals is one of my favorite things. "You want an ownership society? You must be anti-capitalist then." "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bahaa | 1/15/2013

    " one of my favorites, a real insight of the economic life, and a crystal vision "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 rob | 12/8/2012

    " I'm glad I read this book once, and I think it's important for educated people to read, since it is the framework that most macroeconomics are based on, but I wouldn't read it again. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brendan | 11/29/2012

    " Very long and tedious at parts, but there are nuggets that make it worth the read. "

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About the Author
Author Adam Smith

Adam Smith (1723–1790) was born in a small village in Kirkcaldy, Scotland. He entered the University of Glasgow at age fourteen and later attended Balliol College at Oxford. After lecturing for a period, he held several teaching positions at the University of Glasgow. His greatest achievement was writing The Wealth of Nations, a five-book series that sought to reveal the true causes of prosperity and which established him as the father of contemporary economic thought.