Download The Theory of Moral Sentiments Audiobook

The Theory of Moral Sentiments Audiobook, by Adam Smith Extended Sample Click for printable size audiobook cover
Author: Adam Smith Narrator: John Clickman Publisher: Author's Republic Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: June 2019 ISBN: 9781982757793
0 out of 50 out of 50 out of 50 out of 50 out of 5 0.00 (0 ratings) (rate this audio book)
Regular Price: $29.99 Add to Cart
— or —
BEST PRICE!
FlexPass™ Price: $12.95$7.95$7.95 for new members!
Add to Cart learn more )

Written in 1759 by Scottish philosopher and political economist Adam Smith, The Theory of Moral Sentiments provides much of the foundation for the ideas in his later works, most notably in The Wealth of Nations.

Through this initial text, Smith expresses his general system of morals, exploring the propriety of action, reward and punishment, sense of duty, and the effect of numerous factors on moral sentiment. In so doing, Smith devised innovative theories on virtues, conscience, and moral judgment that are still relevant and accessible today. Though somewhat surprising to find a philosopher of Smith's abilities discussing aspects such as luck and sympathy and how they affect self-image or relationships, The Theory of Moral Sentiments never loses its critical excellence in its good-natured understanding of the human exploration for the meaning of being good. Download and start listening now!

dgyf

Listener Reviews

Be the first to write a review about this audiobook!
Write a Review

About the Author

George H. Smith is an author, editor, educator, and speaker. His first book was the very popular Atheism: The Case against God. Smith began teaching in the 1970s and for nearly twenty years spent his summers instructing university students in political philosophy and American political and intellectual history at seminars sponsored by the Cato Institute and the Institute for Humane Studies. His many articles and book reviews have appeared in a wide range of publications, including Reason, the New York Times, and the Journal of Libertarian Studies.