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Download The Procrastination Equation: How to Stop Putting Things Off and Start Getting Stuff Done Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Procrastination Equation: How to Stop Putting Things Off and Start Getting Stuff Done Audiobook, by Piers Steel Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (288 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Piers Steel Narrator: Pete Larkin Publisher: HarperCollins Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 2010 ISBN: 9780062079695
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The Procrastination Equation will teach you how to bust the excuses that are preventing you from doing your best work and living your best life….So don’t put it off any longer. Read this book. Today.”
 —Daniel H. Pink, author of Drive and A Whole New Mind

“Illuminating….Piers Steel shows us the secrets of procrastination, how it affects us and how we will, one day, be able to prevail.”
—Dan Ariely, author of The Upside of Irrationality and Predictably Irrational

Using a mix of psychology, evolutionary biology, self-help, and more than a decade of research, Dr. Piers Steel, the world’s foremost authority on procrastination, offers a tried and true method helping us to identify, understand, and break free of our self-destructive bad habits and create more positive lives for ourselves.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “Procrastinating just makes unpleasant tasks worse, so why is it so hard for us to resist dithering and delay? The Procrastination Equation is crammed with surprising insights about procrastination and human nature—as well as concrete, helpful solutions for fighting procrastination.”

    Gretchen Rubin, New York Times bestselling author of The Happiness Project

  • “Procrastination is the saffron spice of human behavior, where even small amounts of this tendency can shatter the best of intentions. In this illuminating book, Piers Steel shows us the secrets of procrastination, how it affects us, and how we will, one day, be able to prevail.”

    Dan Ariely, New York Times bestselling author of The Upside of Irrationality and Predictably Irrational

  • The Procrastination Equation will teach you how to bust the excuses that are preventing you from doing your best work and living your best life...So don’t put it off any longer. Read this book. Today.”

    Daniel H. Pink, New York Times bestselling author of Drive and A Whole New Mind

  • The Procrastination Equation is this season’s must-read self-help book. In addition to offering useful strategies to fight a common problem, it’s a fascinating read.” 

    Montreal Gazette

  • “Piers Steel will help you tackle the goals—big and small—that always seemed just a little out of reach.”

    Richard Florida, author of The Great Reset

  • “Pete Larkin’s smart-aleck vibe works well with this assertive guide, which debunks a good many myths about procrastination and pulls no punches regarding what you should do about it.”

    AudioFile

  • “A useful, eye-opening book.”

    Booklist

  • “An upbeat, motivational guide to procrastination...Everything you ever wanted to know about procrastination but never got around to reading.”

    Kirkus Reviews

Listener Opinions

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Jenny | 2/20/2014

    " Abandoned. Unreadable. Interesting topic, of course. I didn't give it much of a chance, I'll admit. Just got a pile of books to read, didn't like his writing style, life's too short, onward. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jonathan Widell | 2/20/2014

    " The author, Dr Piers Steel, takes good care of the reader right away. You know, it would be so easy to get bogged down in making jokes, just as I was: for instance, I kept telling myself to get that book instead of putting it off any longer etc. etc. Luckily, I did get the book. The author is wise enough to go through the motions and indulge in those self-deprecating jokes, just to get them out of the way. But then we are down to business. If you are too lazy to take the quiz in the first chapter of the book, as I was, you can complete another, more elaborate test on the author's website and get your scores and procrastination profile right away. When you continue reading, the author analyzes the great personal and social costs that are due to procrastination. One immediately realizes that the problem is real and the author knows what he is talking about. He backs his analysis with hard scientific evidence based on research that he and others have conducted over the years. Don't let the author's lighthearted way of talking to his readers fool you, he means business. Steel is not necessarily telling us anything new. Oh yeah, it is all there: setting realistic and measurable goals, rewarding yourself when you reach your goals, some tricks to make your work enjoyable and so on. The difference with other self-help books is that Steel backs up his advice with hard scientific research, which saves you the trouble of spending too much time trying to find out what really works in your life. Besides, the scientific data makes you realize you are not alone with your problem, which should be reassuring. There is another thing that sets Steel's book apart from other self-help books. He is categorically against one-sided "positive thinking". You should be a little pessimistic, Steel says. If you do not factor some healthy pessimism into your plans, you will end up wasting your time daydreaming instead of doing anything to make those dreams come true. Steel's entire book is built on that "reality principle": he explains how dangerous it is to keep procrastinating but, on the other hand, he explains that there is something you can do about it. Indeed, the dangers relating to procrastination are very real: they include ballooning credit card debt because you don't want to pay things on time, sagging health because you keep putting off medical checkups and exams, lousy retirement planning because you do not start saving for your retirement in time, you name it. Luckily, the steps you can take to get out of that morass of misery are just as real and tangible as the problems themselves. As I mentioned, the reader's attention is drawn to the humorous manner in which Steel conveys his message. The reader may even begin to wonder whether he should resist Steel's charm offensive or not. While the reader is pondering on such minutiae, Steel does something much more surreptitious and clever. As he explains at the very end of the book, his research is a combination of a number of scientific disciplines. Interestingly, he does not call his approach "interdisciplinary," which must be a term that has fallen out of favour in the academia. Instead, Steel talks of the "integration" of different fields. Steel pulls off quite a feat in providing the reader with the necessary information while keeping the reader amused. Still, the book is eminently practical. Steel summarizes his insights in a "step to step guide to getting stuff done" at the back. The impact this book had on me was tremendous. At least now I know that not all self-help books are dumb. There really is hope. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Elaine | 2/14/2014

    " Found the first couple of chapters hard going. When I got to the financial cost of procrastination this really hit home to me how damaging delaying tasks can be. Lots of different suggested actions to beat procrastination. I'll be giving some of these techniques a go. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bernie May | 2/13/2014

    " Why we procrastinate, how we procrastinate, and actionable advice on how to stop procrastinating. Very insightful, with applications to leadership. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Dana | 2/10/2014

    " All psychology, no real tips on how to get things done. Boo. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ryan | 1/19/2014

    " Very good. Seriously, halfway through reading this book I had a crazy burst of productivity. The action chapters are great, the science/history chapters somewhat less interesting, especially when you are reading the book to seek help! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Karenclifford61 | 1/16/2014

    " Maybe I'm not a procrastinator but rather am unable to find the value in the "should's" that make me feel unproductive "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Yellowoasis | 1/10/2014

    " I quite liked the theory contained in this book but found it ultimately dissatisfying. I wanted more direct, helpful advice. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rich | 12/16/2013

    " A good book, practical and easy to read - but putting it into practise is the hard part "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 James E. Robinson, III | 12/11/2013

    " Good book. Pretty well written. The research chapters weren't real interesting, but the application chapters at the end were good. While you probably won't find any real earth shattering ideas, they are presented pretty well. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Heather P | 11/29/2013

    " Keys to success and helpful information as a whole. I really enjoyed this audio book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dee | 8/16/2013

    " Awesome book and I will blog about it soon at: livritome.wordpress.com. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Blake Kanewischer | 7/24/2013

    " This is an excellent book--it takes in "just enough" history and social science to give its prescriptions credibility. There are practical and actionable tactics to identify what kind of procrastinator you are and how to minimize its impact on you. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kalyn | 7/12/2013

    " Didn't get much out of this one. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brady | 5/9/2013

    " The book looked cheesy to me at first but it's actually pretty legit, definitely helped me get back to work on my master's thesis. You can get the gist of the info in this one by skimming. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alexsandro Soares | 3/24/2013

    " It's a very good book with very usefull advices. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Doug | 11/21/2012

    " I actually finished this book within days of purchasing it, which means I don't even want to think about all the things I must be avoiding. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mary | 10/26/2012

    " Loved it. Practical sense mostly. I look forward to using his strategies. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jen | 5/15/2012

    " A very approachable book with a strong academic foundation. I wish it had more baby steps in it, but it is a logical argument for why we procrastinate and ways to over come our bad habits. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steve | 10/17/2011

    " It's one of the fastest books I've ever read. It helps that it's only a little over 200 pages. In the end, it all comes down to willpower, but he makes good points and recommendations for those who have the will to try and change. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Erika | 7/8/2011

    " Worth reading, helped me understand the why's of procrastination better, but would have liked more definite and clear strategies for improving a tendency toward procrastination. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Karenclifford61 | 5/3/2011

    " Maybe I'm not a procrastinator but rather am unable to find the value in the "should's" that make me feel unproductive "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Claire | 4/20/2011

    " Lots of interesting research, ideas and advice here. Looking forward to making some changes. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kate | 3/31/2011

    " Less stupid than many self-help books. Gave me some good ideas. But I just keep putting off finishing it for some reason ... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brady | 3/23/2011

    " The book looked cheesy to me at first but it's actually pretty legit, definitely helped me get back to work on my master's thesis. You can get the gist of the info in this one by skimming. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jen | 3/7/2011

    " A very approachable book with a strong academic foundation. I wish it had more baby steps in it, but it is a logical argument for why we procrastinate and ways to over come our bad habits. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Erica | 3/2/2011

    " I'll write a review later

    ;) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ryan | 2/28/2011

    " Very good. Seriously, halfway through reading this book I had a crazy burst of productivity. The action chapters are great, the science/history chapters somewhat less interesting, especially when you are reading the book to seek help! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 James | 1/14/2011

    " Good book. Pretty well written. The research chapters weren't real interesting, but the application chapters at the end were good. While you probably won't find any real earth shattering ideas, they are presented pretty well. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Dave | 10/14/2010

    " Would like to get to this book eventually.... "

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About the Author

Piers Steel, PhD, one of the world’s foremost researchers and speakers on the science of motivation and procrastination, is the winner of the Killam Emerging Research Leader Award. Dr. Steel’s research has appeared in numerous outlets around the world, ranging from Psychology Today and New Scientist to Good Housekeeping and The New Yorker. He lives in Calgary, Alberta, with his wife and two sons.

About the Narrator

Pete Larkin has narrated dozens of audiobook titles, won five Earphones Awards, and been a finalist in 2012 for the prestigious Audie Award for best narration. He has been praised for his expert ability to speak in multiple accents. He is also an on-camera host and accomplished voice-over artist for hundreds of commercials and promos for a variety of companies, corporations, and governmental agencies. He was the public address announcer for the New York Mets and has worked as a radio jockey in New York, Baltimore, and Washington, DC.