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Extended Audio Sample Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave Audiobook, by Frederick Douglass Click for printable size audiobook cover
4.36 out of 54.36 out of 54.36 out of 54.36 out of 54.36 out of 5 4.36 (55 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Frederick Douglass Narrator: Raymond Hearn Publisher: Gildan Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2015 ISBN: 9781469063140
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This classic of American literature, a dramatic autobiography of the early life of an American slave, was first published in 1845, when its author had just achieved his freedom. It is a story that shocked the world with its first-hand account of the horrors of slavery. The book was an incredible success. His eloquence gives a clear indication of the powerful principles that led Douglass to become the first great African-American leader in the United States.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anna | 2/19/2014

    " Amazing, heartwrenching, profound. Douglass was an amazing person and tells his story in such a straightforward but eloquent way. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bethany | 2/19/2014

    " A direct and honest account of a freed slave, a well-stated and thoughtful narrative providing a window into a life in slavery. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Benilde C. | 2/18/2014

    " I enjoyed reading this book and I also did not enjoy it. This book caught my attention when Douglass described the life of the slaves. They were not given enough food to survive and they had to work all day long in the hot sun. Douglass described the whippings of the slaves and that really caught my attention. I did not enjoy the book also because Douglass uses to many details and events of his journey trying to become a free man. Douglass includes all the places that he went to for instance, he went to Baltimore and he fought with his master Cory. Douglass also learns how to caulk and many more on his journey. Reading Douglass's autobiography gave me a better vision of slavery "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Lisa Cook | 2/14/2014

    " Good. I can see why it is an important work, espcially given the historical significance, but it is not my particular cup of tea. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joaquin | 2/13/2014

    " This book is about an African American slave named Fredrick Douglass, who grew up in the 1800's. At a young age Fredrick was sent to live with Hugh and Sophia Auld. One day Fredrick over heard the Aulds talking about African American and how the white people ruled them, and kept them uneducated. Later in the story Fredrick gets picked up by a slave breaker and is taken away from the Auld family. After being picked up by the slave break he was beaten very badly every day by him. Fredrick hated his life he wanted to try and escape from his slave breaker but he knew if he got caught he would be beaten every worse. After awhile Fredrick is too fed up with getting beaten, one day he fights back and beat his slave owners butt. After that his slave owner never messed with him again. A few years later Fredrick becomes a little educated his takes what he knows and uses it for good. He began teaching the other slaves what he has learned. The police found out about his plan and Fredrick was put in jail. After a little bit Fredrick gets sent back to his first family he began saving up his money and when he has enough he escapes to New York. Where he meets, his wife Anna Murray a free slave. After getting married, they move to Massachusetts, where Fredrick ends up becoming a lecturer for an anti slavery society. After reading this book it opened my eyes more too how rough the African Americans had it during the 1800's. Also this book was very interesting. I learned a little bit about Fredrick from history class but this book gave me a better understanding of him. He tried making a difference in the slave life and I am proud he did. He was a good man. I would recommend this but to everyone that has interest in people that had an impact on our history. Also I would recommend this book to any one in our class that needs a recommended book. Because this book can teach you a lot about an important man in are past time. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Erika Lauren | 2/4/2014

    " This is a true eye opening narrative on life as a slave. After reading this in college, I knew it had changed my outlook on life forever. The suffering these people went through is unimaginable yet they were still able to keep their heads up. This is such an inspiring story. I recommend it to everyone. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shelby Fleischer | 2/3/2014

    " AMAZING. Adventure and wonderous prose, a quick read in a very slender volume. But what incredible history. This should be required reading as part of American History. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jackie Zorko-dautovic | 1/31/2014

    " Amazing writing for a man tortured and punished for trying to learn to read and write. What an eye opening look . I never realized the awful deeds of these deplorable slave owners were rationalized by their sick mixed up ideas on Christianity. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michael Eberly | 1/24/2014

    " It's a good book. It is nonfiction but there is still some good action. It helps you realize what it was like for slaves to live back then. It's somewhat hard to read because of the archaic words he uses. Takes some more time to read just because you have to think about and process what he is writing. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Leila | 1/19/2014

    " Interesting read. Learned a lot about this man I've heard about my whole life. Loved his writing style. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ale | 1/18/2014

    " It was a great read and the other articles make it even better. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dpat | 1/17/2014

    " Read it in college. Describes the life of a young African American man and his contribution to American History in a time of struggle for African Americans. Inspiring "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Pearl Schwartz | 1/16/2014

    " Very interesting to read a primary source from a former slave who rose to fame. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tony Peterson | 1/16/2014

    " I can't say anything about Douglass that hasn't already been said. He is a personal hero of mine and someone we should all look up to. The most important lesson that Douglass taught us is that literacy is the path from slavery to freedom. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Victoria Nguyen | 1/15/2014

    " Probably my favorite reading assignment from my short stint in the Honors College. I never wanted to put it down. The prose is so clear and pulls you in. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lakishia | 12/29/2013

    " Loved it. Douglass does an excellent job with retelling the events of slavery as it concerned him. I loved this book so much. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Deni | 12/23/2013

    " Douglass' narrative makes me appreciate what I have. This narrative is very skillfully written... I loved this book! I recommend it to all willing to read it! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Emily | 12/16/2013

    " Incredible. Every American should read this book. I can't stress that enough. Required reading!! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Genna Smith | 12/16/2013

    " I have never understood slavery and how deep it went until I read this book. It was a true example of how heroic Douglass was and to what lengths he went to escape slavery and become successful. Great book "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Qrae | 12/16/2013

    " Constantly surprised and corrected on how things were, rather how they were depicted to us in school. Some of the private thoughts Fredrick Douglas had are quite fitting in today's society that everyone can take from. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Amber Dawn | 12/14/2013

    " Interesting read, not an all the time read, but an interesting one time read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Connie Todd-mandler | 12/13/2013

    " I thought this was an amazing, fascinating book. I am 52 and as I grew up(whatever that is) I do not recall learning about any women or men of color-only white male heroes and historical figures. What a remarkable man and so awesome that all these years later, I can read his words. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Connie Todd-mandler | 12/10/2013

    " I thought this was an amazing, fascinating book. I am 52 and as I grew up(whatever that is) I do not recall learning about any women or men of color-only white male heroes and historical figures. What a remarkable man and so awesome that all these years later, I can read his words. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sylvia Johnson | 12/9/2013

    " This is a book that everyone should read to get an understanding of what it was like to be a slave. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mariela | 12/8/2013

    " No words can be said of the cruelty inflicted on African Americans. If only history can be rewritten. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christina | 12/6/2013

    " I did my senior paper on Frederick Douglass...got an A+ :D "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Marciea Pinder | 10/31/2013

    " Can't believe this guy taught himself how to read and write! Amazing! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mark Fallon | 10/29/2013

    " The introduction can be skipped, because Douglass's Narrative is better written. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Deni | 8/7/2013

    " Douglass' narrative makes me appreciate what I have. This narrative is very skillfully written... I loved this book! I recommend it to all willing to read it! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ashley | 7/27/2013

    " Much more entertaining than I expected it would be, and not nearly as grim as Roots, thank goodness (though of course it was stil a pretty brutal story). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Maura | 5/16/2013

    " After Roots, The Confessions of Nat Turner, etc., I can't say I "learned" anything about slavery and the desire for freedom from this quick read. But for me, the fluctuations in writing style -- from scared child, to preacher, etc. -- were fascinating. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jade Saleem | 2/4/2013

    " An excellent book about African American history (all grade levels) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Wendy | 12/6/2012

    " I am so glad that I finally got around to reading about this man in his own words. Loved this book!!! A must read for sure. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Courtney | 11/23/2012

    " Wasn't too crazy about it, everyone says it's amazing and life changing, but it didn't have that effect on me. I expected more details, more description, more imagery. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Maura | 5/24/2012

    " After Roots, The Confessions of Nat Turner, etc., I can't say I "learned" anything about slavery and the desire for freedom from this quick read. But for me, the fluctuations in writing style -- from scared child, to preacher, etc. -- were fascinating. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anne | 5/4/2012

    " This was an eye-opening book for me. His experience was considered fairly mild compared to the experiences of slaves living in the deeper south, and yet I cannot even imagine living through all that he experienced. He was an amazing man, and this is a book that everyone should read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Angie | 12/19/2011

    " This was an eye-opening account of slavery. Some of the scenes were graphic, but a necessary evil. In my opinion, this is a book that every adult should read. I read this in high school, but I didn't appreciate it the way I should have done. Frederick Douglass was an amazing man. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Catherine | 12/9/2011

    " This book and his book, My Bondage and My Freedom were free downloads at Amazon.com so I decided to read these again. I am glad I did! I remember reading these many, many years ago -- it was definitely time to reacquaint myself with his books. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kathryn | 11/24/2011

    " I read this many years ago and it was a complete stunner, absolutely mesmerizing. A slave finally stands up to his abusive master, flees the south, obtains an education and is then able to clearly articulate the plight of the slave. Incredible story, more stunning than fiction. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Katie Umland | 10/10/2011

    " If you like history then this is a good book for you. It gives a good look into the life of a slave. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 LG | 9/10/2011

    " Currently re-reading for the fourth (and probably last) time. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elisa | 6/25/2011

    " Read this in HS and it really had an impact on me. Being in HS and just learning about US slave history, it was hard for me to read and yet I couldn't put it down. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Boston | 6/10/2011

    " I know I should love this book, that it should be a beautiful book about an amazing man, but god, I was bored to death. I think I fell asleep every time I tried to read it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 5/19/2011

    " This book is required reading in my African American History class. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Erica | 5/1/2011

    " I read this for my American Nonfiction class. I enjoyed it because of my particular interests in racism and its roots in the United States. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Risa | 4/24/2011

    " I remember being so proud of the man & this book that I wanted to cry. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Abigael | 4/20/2011

    " Amazing book for learning about life for a young slave boy during abolitionist talks. This would be great for a high school senior or college freshman to read if you want to teach them about Slavery and abolition. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ann | 3/21/2011

    " should be manadatory reading for american history in high school "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jade | 3/21/2011

    " An excellent book about African American history (all grade levels) "

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About the Author
Author Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass (1818–1895), né Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, was born into slavery in Maryland. Upon successfully escaping slavery—on his third attempt—in 1838, Douglass became one of the key leaders of the abolitionist movement in the United States. An extremely gifted orator, Douglass repeatedly risked his own freedom as an antislavery speaker, writer, and statesman. A firm believer in equality for all people, including Native Americans, women, and immigrants, Douglass was also an activist in the women’s suffrage movement. He died in Washington DC, shortly after he attended a meeting of the National Council of Women, where he’d received a standing ovation for his enormous contribution to human rights.