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Download Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave Audiobook, by Frederick Douglass Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (24,019 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Frederick Douglass Narrator: Raymond Hearn Publisher: Gildan Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2015 ISBN: 9781469063140
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This classic of American literature, a dramatic autobiography of the early life of an American slave, was first published in 1845, when its author had just achieved his freedom. It is a story that shocked the world with its first-hand account of the horrors of slavery. The book was an incredible success. His eloquence gives a clear indication of the powerful principles that led Douglass to become the first great African-American leader in the United States.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bethany | 2/19/2014

    " A direct and honest account of a freed slave, a well-stated and thoughtful narrative providing a window into a life in slavery. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Lisa Cook | 2/14/2014

    " Good. I can see why it is an important work, espcially given the historical significance, but it is not my particular cup of tea. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Leila | 1/19/2014

    " Interesting read. Learned a lot about this man I've heard about my whole life. Loved his writing style. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dpat | 1/17/2014

    " Read it in college. Describes the life of a young African American man and his contribution to American History in a time of struggle for African Americans. Inspiring "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Pearl Schwartz | 1/16/2014

    " Very interesting to read a primary source from a former slave who rose to fame. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tony Peterson | 1/16/2014

    " I can't say anything about Douglass that hasn't already been said. He is a personal hero of mine and someone we should all look up to. The most important lesson that Douglass taught us is that literacy is the path from slavery to freedom. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Victoria Nguyen | 1/15/2014

    " Probably my favorite reading assignment from my short stint in the Honors College. I never wanted to put it down. The prose is so clear and pulls you in. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Genna Smith | 12/16/2013

    " I have never understood slavery and how deep it went until I read this book. It was a true example of how heroic Douglass was and to what lengths he went to escape slavery and become successful. Great book "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Qrae | 12/16/2013

    " Constantly surprised and corrected on how things were, rather how they were depicted to us in school. Some of the private thoughts Fredrick Douglas had are quite fitting in today's society that everyone can take from. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Amber Dawn | 12/14/2013

    " Interesting read, not an all the time read, but an interesting one time read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Connie Todd-mandler | 12/10/2013

    " I thought this was an amazing, fascinating book. I am 52 and as I grew up(whatever that is) I do not recall learning about any women or men of color-only white male heroes and historical figures. What a remarkable man and so awesome that all these years later, I can read his words. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sylvia Johnson | 12/9/2013

    " This is a book that everyone should read to get an understanding of what it was like to be a slave. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Marciea Pinder | 10/31/2013

    " Can't believe this guy taught himself how to read and write! Amazing! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mark Fallon | 10/29/2013

    " The introduction can be skipped, because Douglass's Narrative is better written. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Deni | 8/7/2013

    " Douglass' narrative makes me appreciate what I have. This narrative is very skillfully written... I loved this book! I recommend it to all willing to read it! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Courtney | 11/23/2012

    " Wasn't too crazy about it, everyone says it's amazing and life changing, but it didn't have that effect on me. I expected more details, more description, more imagery. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Maura | 5/24/2012

    " After Roots, The Confessions of Nat Turner, etc., I can't say I "learned" anything about slavery and the desire for freedom from this quick read. But for me, the fluctuations in writing style -- from scared child, to preacher, etc. -- were fascinating. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anne | 5/4/2012

    " This was an eye-opening book for me. His experience was considered fairly mild compared to the experiences of slaves living in the deeper south, and yet I cannot even imagine living through all that he experienced. He was an amazing man, and this is a book that everyone should read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Catherine | 12/9/2011

    " This book and his book, My Bondage and My Freedom were free downloads at Amazon.com so I decided to read these again. I am glad I did! I remember reading these many, many years ago -- it was definitely time to reacquaint myself with his books. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kathryn | 11/24/2011

    " I read this many years ago and it was a complete stunner, absolutely mesmerizing. A slave finally stands up to his abusive master, flees the south, obtains an education and is then able to clearly articulate the plight of the slave. Incredible story, more stunning than fiction. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 5/19/2011

    " This book is required reading in my African American History class. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Erica | 5/1/2011

    " I read this for my American Nonfiction class. I enjoyed it because of my particular interests in racism and its roots in the United States. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Risa | 4/24/2011

    " I remember being so proud of the man & this book that I wanted to cry. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Abigael | 4/20/2011

    " Amazing book for learning about life for a young slave boy during abolitionist talks. This would be great for a high school senior or college freshman to read if you want to teach them about Slavery and abolition. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ann | 3/21/2011

    " should be manadatory reading for american history in high school "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jade | 3/21/2011

    " An excellent book about African American history (all grade levels) "

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About the Author
Author Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass (1818–1895), né Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, was born into slavery in Maryland. Upon successfully escaping slavery—on his third attempt—in 1838, Douglass became one of the key leaders of the abolitionist movement in the United States. An extremely gifted orator, Douglass repeatedly risked his own freedom as an antislavery speaker, writer, and statesman. A firm believer in equality for all people, including Native Americans, women, and immigrants, Douglass was also an activist in the women’s suffrage movement. He died in Washington DC, shortly after he attended a meeting of the National Council of Women, where he’d received a standing ovation for his enormous contribution to human rights.