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Extended Audio Sample The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home Audiobook, by Dan Ariely Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (5,545 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Dan Ariely Narrator: Simon Jones Publisher: HarperCollins Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: June 2010 ISBN: 9780062011497
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The provocative follow-up to the New York Times bestseller Predictably Irrational

–Why can large bonuses make CEOs less productive?

–How can confusing directions actually help us?

–Why is revenge so important to us?

–Why is there such a big difference between what we think will make us happy and what really makes us happy?

In his groundbreaking book Predictably Irrational, social scientist Dan Ariely revealed the multiple biases that lead us into making unwise decisions. Now, in The Upside of Irrationality, he exposes the surprising negative and positive effects irrationality can have on our lives. Focusing on our behaviors at work and in relationships, he offers new insights and eye-opening truths about what really motivates us on the job, how one unwise action can become a long-term habit, how we learn to love the ones we’re with, and more.

Drawing on the same experimental methods that made Predictably Irrational one of the most talked-about bestsellers of the past few years, Ariely uses data from his own original and entertaining experiments to draw arresting conclusions about how—and why—we behave the way we do. From our office attitudes, to our romantic relationships, to our search for purpose in life, Ariely explains how to break through our negative patterns of thought and behavior to make better decisions. The Upside of Irrationality will change the way we see ourselves at work and at home—and cast our irrational behaviors in a more nuanced light.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “As in his previous book, the bestselling Predictably Irrational, the experiments Ariely describes generate entertaining and often counterintuitive insights…deciding how to apply [these] insights is a pleasure that lingers long after the book is finished.”

    New York Times

  • “Arielly examines the powerful sway that irrational motivations and urges have on our personal and professional lives. His discussion mixes both his personal experiences and a variety of research, including many experiments performed by him and colleagues. With his crisp English accent and assertive delivery, Simon Jones can be wonderful to listen to.”

    Publishers Weekly

  • “Entertaining and clever…Ariely shows us the other side of the irrationality coin: the beneficial outcomes and pleasant surprises that often arise from irrational behavior…Ariely is an engaging and efficient writer, amusing us with stories about irrational behavior while staying away from needless technical terminology and bafflegab. Thought-provoking, entertaining, and smart: a winning combination.”

    Booklist

  • A New York Times Bestseller

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Smith | 2/18/2014

    " Ariely is a behavioral economist. He addresses various questions by using real life tests that I found quite brilliant at times. His book is much like Freakonomics. Two issues he addressed I found interesting were the quality and results of online dating sites (he had a great test and even better ideas about how to improve them) and if large bonuses increase performance (they do not). "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mike | 2/8/2014

    " Ariely was the most engaging keynote speaker of the 2010 JMP Discovery Conference. I disagree with his interpretative conclusion for a couple experiments in this book, but generally he presents accurate observations of human nature. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kat | 2/4/2014

    " Interesting, thought provoking book. The sections on adaptation and decision making are definitely applicable. I did enjoy the style of Predictably Irrational better. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anthony | 1/17/2014

    " A good, interesting read. As a single guy trying to find love online, I especially liked the chapters on online dating, but it's full of interesting facts and studies, and great stuff to bring up at cocktail parties. If you ever get invited to cocktail parties. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Karol Bucek | 1/17/2014

    " I do not find (Traditional) economics useful to a point when in certain circumstances it should not be even considered (empiric) science, but Behavioral economics, presented by Dan Ariely, is a completely different story ... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Donna | 1/14/2014

    " This is a continuation of his first book. Although it was good, it did not, for me, have as much impact as the first one, which was excellent. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 YingYing | 1/14/2014

    " extremely interesting book. I kind of want to be experimented on now. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ellen | 1/13/2014

    " Interesting read but not much useful information. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alaeddin Hallak | 1/10/2014

    " One of my all-time favorite books. This is the kind of stuff that really intrigues me. Understanding one's own psychology for better decision making and overall functioning. I prefer you read the first book though, Predictably Irrational, before reading this one. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sally | 1/9/2014

    " Fascinating look at what motivates our ethics in the workplace and at home. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Otter57 | 1/3/2014

    " Super book. Both entertaining and informative. Great experiments that are fairly simple to both carry out and understand, yet they reveal deep insights into human behavior. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Chris Hlady | 12/18/2013

    " This is another case where it seems the author used some of his best material for the first book. While I thought Predictably Irrational was a great book and would highly recommend it, I wouldn't recommend The Upside of Irrationality. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Vicki | 12/6/2013

    " Extremely interesting and applicable to daily life! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Chip | 11/11/2013

    " Predictably Irrational, part 2 "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dayna | 10/16/2013

    " Not as good as "Predictably Irrational" but still a fun and light read. If you like books on human behavior its a good choice. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Dave | 7/16/2013

    " The anecdote about cake mix and our need to be involved in the process was really interesting, but a lot of the rest of the book seemed too familiar. Perhaps I've read too many in this genre. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Xiaomin Zu | 2/24/2013

    " It's good to know that we are not purely computers which only act rationally. Irrationality has its advantages and it's what makes us human. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Darrin Holst | 9/3/2012

    " This book is as well done or better than his first one. There were a couple slow parts in there like the online dating stuff, but overall I'd recommend it. Learned about the effects of bonuses or high pay, revenge, hedonic adaptation, how emotions affect decision making, etc. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Niniane Wang | 8/19/2012

    " Entertaining and has some thought-provoking tidbits. I like that it is focused on the positive. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Peter De Run | 6/1/2012

    " Fantastic, enlightening a good read to help understand many things . . . "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Emilia | 4/24/2012

    " Fascinating book. I found it quite interesting, the writing very enjoyable, and it makes me rethink the way I think about things. I will be looking for more books by him! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jihad Lahham | 3/2/2012

    " fun read, fairly light, lots of cool experiments. not gonna blow your mind away but it'll keep you engaged and entertained. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Luda | 2/23/2012

    " A blick refection of 'Predictably Irrational' "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jayson Hoogeveen | 2/18/2012

    " Another great book by Dan Ariely about our irrationality and the experiments he created to test them. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shantnu Mathuria | 1/11/2012

    " Dan Ariely yet again manages to challenge our thinking and our "rational" decisions. The book unfurls the secret behind our irrational and biased decisions. It's got some really interesting and mind opening facts. Excellent book for psychology.This book deserves no less than 5 stars. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sidik | 6/9/2011

    " SIX WORD REVIEW: Behavior economist's life work/therapeutic memoir. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Damien | 6/1/2011

    " Interesting, but the Kindle version has terrible formatting. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jackie | 5/20/2011

    " More of what's good about Ariely's writing! This is an approachable and enjoyable study of human behavior. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Niniane | 5/12/2011

    " Entertaining and has some thought-provoking tidbits. I like that it is focused on the positive. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sarah | 5/1/2011

    " I thought this was very thought provoking. Lots to think about and munch on. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Taner | 4/6/2011

    " While not as engaging as Predictably Irrational, there are a lot of interesting studies in this follow-up. Definitely worth a quick read.
    "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maureen | 3/30/2011

    " Ariely does a great job of showing why we do the silly things we do, even though we usually know better. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Brandon | 3/14/2011

    " This book was good, but not nearly as interesting or well-written as Dan's first book (Predictably Irrational). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Audrey | 3/11/2011

    " Dan is very effective at engaging the reader and triggering self-examination of behaviors. He also reveals much more about his own journey than he did in Predictably Irrational. Great book. "

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About the Author
Author Dan Ariely

Dan Ariely is the author of the New York Times bestsellers Predictably Irrational and The Upside of Irrationality. He is the James B. Duke Professor of Psychology and Behavioral Economics at Duke University, with appointments at their Fuqua School of Business, the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, the Department of Economics, and the School of Medicine. He earned PhDs in cognitive psychology and business administration and is the founder and director of the Center for Advanced Hindsight. Among the many outlets to feature his work are the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and Boston Globe.

About the Narrator

Simon Jones is an AudioFile Earphones Award-winning narrator. He has appeared in the films The Devil’s Own, Twelve Monkeys, For Love or Money, Green Card, Brazil, Monty Python’s Meaning of Life, and Miracle on 34th Street. His television appearances include a role in The Cosby Mysteries and Murder She Wrote, and he has been featured in nine Broadway productions.