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Download The Tell-Tale Brain: A Neuroscientist's Quest for What Makes Us Human Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Tell-Tale Brain: A Neuroscientists Quest for What Makes Us Human Audiobook, by V. S. Ramachandran Click for printable size audiobook cover
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (2,143 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: V. S. Ramachandran Narrator: David Drummond Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: January 2011 ISBN: 9781452670645
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V. S. Ramachandran is at the forefront of his field-so much so that Richard Dawkins dubbed him the "Marco Polo of neuroscience." Now, in a major new work, Ramachandran sets his sights on the mystery of human uniqueness. Taking us to the frontiers of neurology, he reveals what baffling and extreme case studies can teach us about normal brain function and how it evolved. Synesthesia becomes a window into the brain mechanisms that make some of us more creative than others. And autism-for which Ramachandran opens a new direction for treatment-gives us a glimpse of the aspect of being human that we understand least: self-awareness. Ramachandran tackles the most exciting and controversial topics in neurology with a storyteller's eye for compelling case studies and a researcher's flair for new approaches to age-old questions. Tracing the strange links between neurology and behavior, this book unveils a wealth of clues into the deepest mysteries of the human brain. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • Ramachandran produces an exhilarating and at times funny text that invites discussion and experimentation. Kirkus

Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Karin Gottshall | 1/31/2014

    " If consciousness is a medical condition, then I guess this book can be considered a "tour" of it. This book fails to live up to its ambitious subtitle, and is terribly written to boot. I gained no real insight into "what makes us human;" all I really got out of this book are some fun anecdotes to impress people with at parties about the freaky things that can happen when you poke someone's brain. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Simmons51 | 1/20/2014

    " Fascinating research by a neuroscientist about how the brain works, and sometimes doesn't work, at least not in the usual way. Autism, phantom limbs, and synesthesia are just a few of the areas discussed. The author also explains his theories on the evolution of the human brain and what it is that makes us different from other animals. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Melissa Sherowski | 12/15/2013

    " one of the best accounts of the nature of consciousness that i have read to date. well written, thoroughly researched and insightful. highly recommended if you are interested in consciousness and the human mind. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ted | 11/18/2013

    " Really interesting if you've ever wondered how your brain works. Not really technical at all but does start to become redundant towards the end. So it could have been shorter for those of us that have only a passing interest in the subject but still all and all more than worth the read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kate | 10/21/2013

    " Every time I open this book I have a "duuude" moment. As Ramachandran points out, we have come from the stone age to the space age of neuroscience in 20 years and our progress continues to be exponential. I am in constant awe of what what we know about brains and what they are capable of. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Histteach24 | 10/10/2013

    " The most boring book I ever read. Although I guess it is good if you need it for research purposes. Some topics were interesting but I found the author's attempt at humor to be not funny and inappropriate at times. Read it only if you are interested in this field for work/research purposes. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Virginia | 7/18/2013

    " Contains some great case study reports and neuro examples I'll be able to use in class. Admittedly, much of the portions on aesthetics and perception seems speculative, more "it might be this way" than "here is what the science says." As a result, I got bogged down there and struggled to finish. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ken | 7/17/2013

    " A very good book written by a brilliant and entertaining scientist. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 C.B. Brooks | 6/29/2013

    " Very good story of the detective work that sheds light on how our brains function. Occasionally gets bogged down in describing studies. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Taner | 6/10/2013

    " Not always the most engaging, but contains some truly incredible information. Makes me excited for the future. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Matthew Shoe | 4/14/2013

    " I haven't read a book about the brain in years, so I may have been a soft sell for this exposition on some of the more recent advances in neuroscience. Mind-blowing! (pardon the pun!) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Robert | 9/25/2012

    " Although wildly speculative at times and often nearly repeating whole chunks from his earlier book, still manages to be compellingly thought-provoking and filled with interesting details about the brain and the way we work. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Deb | 8/5/2012

    " A well-written discussion of how the brain's structures alter perception. Helps to have some medical/biological background, but isn't necessary to enjoy the book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Urvi | 9/29/2011

    " most interesting book , I have read so far ... enjoying every bit of it "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cavin Balaster | 9/13/2011

    " Awesome! Excellent narrative that is not too scientific, but not to simple either. VS Ramachandran has an incredible knack for taking very complex topics and relating them in a fully digestible form. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hanafi | 8/18/2011

    " Superb read on the author's long-time research on how the brain works. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David Everling | 8/11/2011

    " Intriguing case studies and conclusions that broach Philosophy of Mind. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Wendy | 5/23/2011

    " This book had a lot of interesting bits, but I ended up skipping over a lot of the explanations on how parts of the brain were connected. I'm also not that into the evolution explanation of the brain. Maybe "that's the way God made it" is good enough. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Beverly | 5/19/2011

    " There were lots of interesting bits to this book, but I found Ramachandran to be quite glib and full of himself. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 BLACK CAT | 5/14/2011

    " A mix of brain faults with neurological explanation. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ted | 4/7/2011

    " Really interesting if you've ever wondered how your brain works. Not really technical at all but does start to become redundant towards the end. So it could have been shorter for those of us that have only a passing interest in the subject but still all and all more than worth the read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Delilah | 3/31/2011

    " Fascinating, lots of food for thought and presented in a very accessible and easy-to-read fashion without being condescending or patronising. Gentle humour and mind-blowing science. Highly recommended. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Candice | 3/14/2011

    " I will need to come back to this book. Due to many library books all coming in at once, I had to switch to another book before I could finish this one. I was very happy with this book though, and I can't wait to come back to it! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Debra | 3/10/2011

    " V.S. Ramachandran takes the complex and reveals a path to comprehension. If you've ever wondered about the evolution of human brain systems which lead to our complex abilities with language, or just how the brain allows us to appreciate art - and other mysteries within ourselves, this is the book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Craig | 2/27/2011

    " Ramachandran makes what could be an impossibly difficult subject for most readers (like myself) quite entertaining and intriguing. Well done. "

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About the Author

V. S. Ramachandran is the director of the Center for Brain and Cognition and a professor with the psychology department and neurosciences program at the University of California–San Diego. He is the author of A Brief Tour of Human Consciousness and coauthor, with Sandra Blakeslee, of Phantoms in the Brain. He lives in San Diego.

About the Narrator

David Drummond has made his living as an actor for over twenty-five years, appearing on stages large and small throughout the country and in Seattle, Washington, his hometown. He has narrated over thirty audiobooks, in genres ranging from current political commentary to historical nonfiction, fantasy, military, thrillers, and humor. He received an AudioFile Earphones Award for his first audiobook, Love ’Em or Lose ’Em: Getting Good People to Stay. When not narrating, he keeps busy writing plays and stories for children.