Extended Audio Sample

Download The Man Who Was Thursday Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Man Who Was Thursday (Unabridged) Audiobook, by G. K. Chesterton
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (11,024 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: G. K. Chesterton Narrator: Simon Vance Publisher: christianaudio.com Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: January 2009 ISBN:
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This is quite possibly Chesterton's most famous novel. All that G. K. Chesterton's critics labeled him- devotional, impious, confounding, intelligent, humorous, bombastic - he wove into The Man Who Was Thursday. This page-turner sends characters bobbing around a delightfully confusing plot of mythic proportions.

The story begins when two poets meet. Gabriel Syme is a poet of law. Lucian Gregory is a poetic anarchist. As the poets protest their respective philosophies, they strike a challenge. In the ruckus that ensues, the Central European Council of Anarchists elects Syme to the post of Thursday, one of their seven chief council positions. Undercover. On the run, Syme meets with Sunday, the head of the council, a man so outrageously mysterious that his antics confound both the law-abiding and the anarchist.

Who is lawful? Who is immoral? Such questions are strangely in the presence of Sunday. He is wholly other. He is above the timeless questions of humanity and also somehow behind them. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ms_prue | 2/18/2014

    " If you believe, as Mr Chesterton does, that Satan is a redhead, you will enjoy this anti-anarchist, overtly Christian tale of pursuit and realisation. Personally, I read it for the lulz, and I was not disappointed. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Perry | 2/15/2014

    " The Man Who Was Thursday is probably the best book I've ever read. On the surface it's about secret police who hunt anarchists, plus a lot of other trademarks of a thriller like double-agents and characters in disguise. But what really won out for me was how the book has this whole funhouse mirror quality to it. Like, it's totally natural for characters to walk crookedly down alleys or have distorted faces or...well, there's just a lot of weird touches which in other books would come off as supernatural, but in this book blend right into the fabric of reality. Loved this. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jack | 2/14/2014

    " As classics go, a fairly contemporary read. Not sure of a great grander meaning but there are some fairly quotable and thought-provoking sections. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Pnyxis | 2/10/2014

    " Extraordinario, un libro muy recomendable, una novela que atrapa y que cuenta con un gran transfondo. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Courtney | 1/24/2014

    " wild story... still trying to figure it all out! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Megan Fritts | 1/14/2014

    " So, for anyone who's read Orthodoxy . . . I discovered that TMWWT is a fictionalized version of the chapter "Ethics of Elfland." Which happened to be my favorite chapter in the book. Needless to say, because of this, Thursday was a fantastic read, displaying some of (imo) Chesterton's most exemplary writing. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Scott | 1/9/2014

    " The last third got too preachy for me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Leslie | 1/1/2014

    " Bizarre but interesting story. At first, this seems to be a straightforward suspense thriller of police versus anarchists, but as the story progresses, it gets stranger and stranger. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mike Horne | 12/27/2013

    " I actually took this off of my favorite books (on Facebook) after reading it again. I thought it was just OK. I am going to have to reread all my G.K. Chesterton. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rachel | 12/11/2013

    " I'm so confused by the ending (the last two chapters or so). I must be too sleepy to read it properly. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bethany Dean | 11/10/2013

    " My favourite book of all time: a tale of anarchists, weekdays, spies and disguises. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jessica | 10/26/2013

    " Now, this is a book to read! Why I never read this in high school or as an English graduate class is beyond me, especially with an emphasis on the dystopia novels. Witty, intelligent and engaging. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris Brakebill | 10/10/2013

    " This might be the first REAL literature I ever read on my own. I might have read it bc a girl I liked read it but still, I really enjoyed it though "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Margaretmary | 9/8/2013

    " This is an excellent 'thriller' by G. K. Chesterton. The ending is peculiar and difficult to understand, however. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Clarissa | 4/23/2013

    " I had a hard time with this one. Every time a person was called Thursday, Sunday or whatever day, my brain kept flashing to Reservoir Dogs. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nick | 3/27/2013

    " Marvellous - vintage derring-do overlaid with opiates... that conceals an message, a story of good an evil as relevant today as at any time through human history. The plot twists and turns and the denouement was unexpected - or was it? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Steve | 12/21/2012

    " One of my favorite books ever. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cathy Stewart | 7/20/2012

    " I didn't finish this, but I appreciate it for the period it was written in. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Emre Ergin | 10/13/2011

    " that was a surprise ending. not only from the point of story, but it changed even the genre of the book. even though i am surprised, i am not happy about that, feel much more like was deceived. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 jenmoomin | 9/21/2011

    " "bad is so bad, that we cannot but think good an accident; good is so good, that we feel certain that evil could be explained." "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Heather | 5/2/2011

    " I think I liked it, but... wtf? "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mark | 4/29/2011

    " Curious mystery turns into an allegory. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Micha | 4/27/2011

    " A fun romp full of anarchists and private police and Chesterton's sometimes-predictable but other times totally laughingly-absurd humour. The plot follows exactly the kind of course I sometimes wish my life would. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Zvi | 4/23/2011

    " Peculiar, funny, and unexpectedly allegorical. The central conceit of the book (infiltrating the anarchist council) is engaging and the prose aphoristic, but the metaphysical ending left me cold. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Monica | 4/6/2011

    " Weird, and left me thinking. Someone else please read this so I can talk to someone about it.
    "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Cathy | 4/2/2011

    " There is a reason it is called a nightmare - the confusion could only be justified as a dream. It does get one thinking about anarchy and government. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 aimee | 3/26/2011

    " awesome. just awesome.

    read it _now_ "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tyler | 3/25/2011

    " Entertaining and goofy in an English sort of way. I liked it. The twist at the end wasn't as interesting as it could have been. Slightly disappointing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ryan | 3/20/2011

    " Amazing story of political extremity "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 3/13/2011

    " Well done but a bit dated. I was also put off by the religious aspect of the ending.

    My first e-book! (a free one) "

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About the Author

Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874–1936) published numerous works which include compilations of his voluminous journalism, novels, biographies, histories, criticism, Christian apologetics, poetry, and plays. Many of his novels have the genuine marks of genius. His books on Dickens (for whom he had a considerable affinity) and Saint Thomas Aquinas are considered classics in their fields.

About the Narrator

Simon Vance (a.k.a. Robert Whitfield) is an award-winning actor and an AudioFile Golden Voice with over forty Earphones Awards. He has won thirteen prestigious Audie Awards and was Booklist’s very first Voice of Choice in 2008. He has narrated more than eight hundred audiobooks over almost thirty years, beginning when he was a radio newsreader for the BBC in London.