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Extended Audio Sample The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Audiobook, by Mark Twain Click for printable size audiobook cover
3.77 out of 53.77 out of 53.77 out of 53.77 out of 53.77 out of 5 3.77 (61 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Mark Twain Narrator: Garrison Keillor Publisher: Highbridge Audio Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: May 2003 ISBN: 9781598873337
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Narrated by Huck himself in his artless vernacular, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn tells of Huck’s voyage down the Mississippi with a runaway slave named Jim. As the two journey downstream on a raft, Huck’s vivid descriptions capture the sights, smells, sounds, and rhythms of life on the great river. As they encounter traveling actors, con men, lynch mobs, thieves, and Southern gentility, his shrewd comments reveal the dark side of human nature. By the end of the story, Huck has learned about the dignity and worth of human life—and Twain has exposed the moral blindness of the “respectable” slave-holding society in which he lives. Huckleberry Finn was Twain’s greatest creation.

In adapter and narrator Garrison Keillor’s own words: “This is an abridgement of Mark Twain’s book, keeping the parts I loved as a boy—Huck’s story, the big river at night, the boasting of the raftsmen, the Duke and the Dauphin, the lynching, the feud—and lopping off the last third of the book, where Tom Sawyer comes in and makes a big production of freeing Jim. I had Huck free him instead. If you enjoy the reading, I am sure Mr. Twain will forgive me.”

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Bianca | 2/17/2014

    " took so long to complete "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Vicky Beale | 2/11/2014

    " This book is a good read for Children and adults. However, it is not a light read and needs a bit of concentration to understand the Southern American Accents. Not really suitable to read on a train! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ampion | 2/8/2014

    " Great book... till the ending made all the events in the story almost entirely worthless "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chad | 2/8/2014

    " I enjoyed this audio version so much. Mark Twain is truly amazing in how he captures the simple vocabulary of Huck Finn from Northeast Missouri. The adventures that Huck finds himself in are incredible and I found myself chuckling outloud at many of the situations that Mr. Twain placed Huck in. This should be a top read on everyones shelf and if the book is difficult to read due to the "twang" then I would recommend on audio version of this great work. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Esther Kim | 2/8/2014

    " Goes hand in hand with "Tom Sawyer" "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ali | 2/7/2014

    " I enjoyed this so much. I have a major crush on Tom Sawyer because of it. Yes. You heard me right. Tom Sawyer, not Huck...not that I don't love Huck though. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Emily Zabrodski | 2/5/2014

    " I haven't read this book since I was a kid, so I forgot how much I want to punch Tom Sawyer in the face. Yet that's part of the genius of Mark Twain (I'm calling him Twain because I'm not one of those snooty people who insist on always calling him Samuel Clemens); he makes me care enough to want to punch Tom Sawyer in the face. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 George Sangiolo | 2/1/2014

    " Huckleberry Finn, Huck to his friends, is the iconic maverick. Having been raised by an alcoholic, abusive father and cared for by a strictly religious woman, Huck has a strong dislike for society, feeling that it has nothing to offer to him. Huck tries very hard to be independent, and he is a very practical, down to earth boy. Despite this, he is always ready for some fun, like an adventure, and he would follow his friend Tom Sawyer to the ends of the earth, no matter how farfetched Tom's plan may be. After adventuring with Tom in another of Twain's stories, Huck finds himself on another adventure as he fakes his own death to escape his father. He finds himself in the company of Jim, a runaway slave. The pair embarks on a journey north so that Jim can buy his family. Through the various encounters and experiences that they have whenever they go ashore, they form a mutual respect for one another, and young Huck, who like most people at the time didn't think of Jim as human, questions the way society taught him to view African Americans. On their way north, the intrepid duo evades capture, discovery, con men and blood feuds. By the end, Jim is freed and Huck appears to continue to be his adventurous, nomadic self. Twains remarkable story is witty and suspenseful, and the characters are all very interesting (even King Louis XVI (XVII?)). This is a memorable read, and it will continue to be treasure by readers for a long time to come. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Christina | 1/31/2014

    " not a big fan of this book but it is an american classic. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jung Min Lee | 1/30/2014

    " Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was definitely on of the better books that I read in school. Twain uses colloquial language rather than deep metaphorical language and there were lots of action happening on every page. Sometimes there were so many action going on a page that I lost track of where I was and what happened but other than that, I think it was a book to enjoy reading during one's free time. Mark Twain writes in the point of view of a child, Huck, and looks upon the society with a critical eye. He especially looks at religion, and the hypocritical nature of human beings. Huck looks at religion very critically and knows that praying will not have a big effect in his life. When Huck prayed for something he wanted, he never got what he wanted. However, when Jim is sold off by the dauphin, Huck tries to put his last hope on religion and try to pray but he ends up deciding "to go to hell" rather than to do what is "right". There are lots of episodes in which Twain comments about Human nature. There is the episode about the Grangerfords who are the perfect civilized christian who kills the Shepardsons and goes in to mass with guns between their legs. Twain also puts in the characters "duke" and "dauphin" from the middle of the book who are "professional con-men" who shows the lies or schemes that people make to do anything to get what they want (maybe Twain is trying to comment on those people who would do anything to achieve their "American Dream"). Through the small episode where the colonel shot a drunk man and the mob trying to lynch the colonel, Twain also portrays the cowardly side of humans, spineless to not carry out their opinions. Even through Tom Twain makes a comment. Tom is a character who is full of Romance and tries to live the romance in the novel. However, Tom's attempts to live the life is unpractical, causing exponential amount of more trouble rather than making it smoother. Huck is another character that sometimes gets mocked by Twain by doing some unwise actions. Through stories and happening to Huck while he travels down the Mississippi, Twain mocks the human nature that exists in our society. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alan | 1/26/2014

    " Twain, sharp as hell, lets the slavery apologists have it. Terrifying to modern readers with its true to the time use of racist epithets, and uncomfortable beyond that with an educated white man's sympathy-from-high-ground, it remains a fun and witty read, and possibly still a good introduction to oppression and equality for young people. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Philip Gonzalez | 1/26/2014

    " good book for high school reading "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura Marie | 1/18/2014

    " Appropriate for 4th grade and above. Adventurous book about a boy who gets himself into trouble at times. It's enjoyable and fun to read have have read to you. Students can appreciate the mischief because, at their age, they themselves would think what he does is funny; wishing they could do it the selves. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Morgan | 1/17/2014

    " Another classic I put off far too long to read. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Adam | 1/15/2014

    " One of the worst books ever written "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tonya | 1/14/2014

    " I was required to read this in high school. It was an okay book. I usually like classics, but this one didn't impact me much. Nonetheless, I think it's a decent book and provides an interesting looking into a part of America's past. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kimberly | 1/8/2014

    " Loved it, again. Mark Twain is a fantastic author. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Aurea | 1/6/2014

    " Simply amazing! I do prefer Tom Sawyer over this book though, but all in all, this book is entertaining as hell! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Emalie | 12/30/2013

    " This book was alright. I felt like it could have been shorter. There was stories within the whole story. There was a few places that really confused me and the spark notes help a lot with this book. The overall message was will developed within the book. But overall the book was just okay. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Phil Villarreal | 12/25/2013

    " Very funny, written with a convincingly immature voice, but layered with delicious sarcasm and poignant social observations. Uses the phrase "by and by" way too much though. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Salem | 12/24/2013

    " I read this with my little sister and my dad. It was very difficult to understand what the characters were talking about! But some parts made me laugh out loud. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Geoff Smith | 12/14/2013

    " Wonderful book . . . until the end, when Twain ran out of ideas. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Megan Marie | 12/7/2013

    " The reason I became in love with reading, along with To Kill A Mockingbird. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alert Holtman | 12/1/2013

    " Exciting, have to get used to the language in the beginning though "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jim Mckitrick | 11/26/2013

    " good adventure for the times "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sabrina Depue | 11/6/2013

    " This was another book I read for school. I thought it was pretty good, but I probably would not have read it if my teacher had not told us to read it. The chapters are very long and it is hard to read in parts. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Katina Brown | 11/5/2013

    " It's a classic adventure written in "pre-politically correct." What happened to these days? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Octopusgoo | 10/7/2013

    " So many characters of so many types. Adventure on a raft, a great insight to the American south. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Durga | 9/29/2013

    " Tom Sawyer's character is horrible. Glad the book had only a few chapters with him in them. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ariadna73 | 9/27/2013

    " The most shocking part for me is the way the hero thinks about black people and slaves. He thinks of them as if they were property and doesn't care if they become his friends of anything. In his mind, being loyal to a slave friend, is like being loyal to a pair of shoes. Horrible. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cassidy | 9/24/2013

    " I liked this book a lot more than I thought I was going to. Twain's sense of humor is great...I actually laughed out loud on more than one occasion while reading. I plan on reading more of his work, as soon as I get the time. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gregory Dickison | 9/7/2013

    " A first-class audio book with a great reader. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah Hartman | 6/14/2013

    " create schema of language used... derogatory terms used, should clarify (multiculturalism) "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alert Holtman | 4/5/2013

    " Exciting, have to get used to the language in the beginning though "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Leisa | 4/4/2013

    " I got to see the world through someone else's eyes and live in a different time in history. Another of those books thar builds empathy. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Laura Whitcomb | 3/20/2013

    " I know, when forced to read this book in school we resist, but I read it as an adult and was blown away. A great combination of adventure, humor, and sweetness. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lauren Cecil | 3/8/2013

    " Alyhought this is a very historical book, I found myself bored and sick or reading the words by and by... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Becky Jo Gesteland | 12/16/2012

    " it gets better every time "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lucer131 | 10/18/2012

    " This is my all time favorite book. It has great characters and never ending plot twists. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Marc | 9/18/2012

    " Listening to Tom Parker's reading made this classic come alive, very well done. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jane | 8/30/2012

    " i was having fun until tom sawyer came in and ruined it all. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ted Dziedzic | 8/1/2012

    " Classic American literature very descriptive of life along the Missippippi River. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bill Goode | 7/21/2012

    " Fantastic book. The writing is nothing short of magical at times. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sandy | 6/6/2012

    " I love this book almost as much as Tom Sawyer it is one of those read over and over again books. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jordan Lagestee | 6/1/2012

    " it was an amazing book, Huck is the boy that every boy wants to be. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 BK Bazhe | 5/11/2012

    " One of the best writers, ever; "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Haley | 4/25/2012

    " I tried incredibly hard to like this book. maybe it was because it was for school and I was forced to read and annotate it but I just couldnt get into it. I made it to page 70 and then sparknotes happened... maybe I'll try for it again someday. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ben | 1/21/2012

    " One of my favorite all time books. Just an amazing story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kelle Lloyd | 8/2/2011

    " I loved The Adventures of Tom Sawyer as a kid, but struggled to get through Huck Finn. I'm glad now that I read it as an adult because I think I enjoyed the humor and satire in it do much more. And I realized that my precious Tom Sawyer of my youth is kind of a dick! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Karen | 5/25/2011

    " Fascinating study of time and place long gone. Difficult word makes teh reality work, but so glad we don't live in a country that accepts it now. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Emma | 5/22/2011

    " A thousand times better than Tom Sawyer (the character, that is). Adventures of Huckleberry Finn provides a mature look at race relations through the eyes of a young boy. This work is nothing short of great. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steven | 5/22/2011

    " I thought it was good but not great. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Judi | 5/21/2011

    " Maybe my expectations were too high. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Colin | 5/19/2011

    " this was the best book I ever read. I want to read it again and again and again. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Eva Anne | 5/17/2011

    " Dissected this one for English class. Sometimes, discussion takes all the charm out of a book. So do angry yet subtle attacks at Romanticism. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michelle | 5/15/2011

    " Read this one back in the 6th grade for an English assignment & still remember most of it to this day :) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mike | 5/14/2011

    " I think this was the first real novel I ever read, and I decided I wanted to be a writer. I also decided I wanted to sail a raft down the Mississippi River! "

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About the Author
Author Mark Twain

Mark Twain, pseudonym of Samuel L. Clemens (1835–1910), was born in Florida, Missouri, and grew up in Hannibal on the west bank of the Mississippi River. He attended school briefly and then at age thirteen became a full-time apprentice to a local printer. When his older brother Orion established the Hannibal Journal, Samuel became a compositor for that paper and then, for a time, an itinerant printer. With a commission to write comic travel letters, he traveled down the Mississippi. Smitten with the riverboat life, he signed on as an apprentice to a steamboat pilot. After 1859, he became a licensed pilot, but two years later the Civil War put an end to the steam-boat traffic.

In 1861, he and his brother traveled to the Nevada Territory where Samuel became a writer for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise, and there, on February 3, 1863, he signed a humorous account with the pseudonym Mark Twain. The name was a river man’s term for water “two fathoms deep” and thus just barely safe for navigation.

In 1870 Twain married and moved with his wife to Hartford, Connecticut. He became a highly successful lecturer in the United States and England, and he continued to write.

About the Narrator

Garrison Keillor is the bestselling author of Lake Wobegon Days, Happy To Be Here, Leaving Home, We Are Still Married, Radio Romance, The Book of Guys, and Wobegon Boy. He is the host of A Prairie Home Companion on American public radio and a contributor to Time magazine. He lives in Wisconsin and New York City.