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Download Sway: The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behavior Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Sway: The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behavior Audiobook, by Ori Brafman Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (5,426 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Ori Brafman Narrator: John Apicella Publisher: Highbridge Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: June 2008 ISBN: 9781598876307
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A challenging investigation of human decision-making, explaining why we choose to act so wildly irrational at times <#150> from spending too much to trusting the wrong person. Drawing on cutting-edge research from the fields of social psychology, behavio Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 deborah | 2/19/2014

    " This book was a bit too elementary for me or anyone who's taken more than one psychology course in college. However, it does talk about some of the more interesting findings in recent psychology studies. But, nothing new that has not already been discussed at length in the popular media. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Vijay | 2/9/2014

    " A very quick and entertaining read diving into a variety of examples, I would say it's absolutely worth a read. The writing style reminds me a lot of Malcom Gladwell's books, but didn't get repetitive. As such, it is easily a book that can be gone through in a few hours. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Bailey | 2/7/2014

    " I abandoned this about 2/3 of the way through. It seemed superficial and over-simplistic to me; I wasn't swayed. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joy | 2/4/2014

    " Similar to Freakanomics, but not quite as good. Really neat ideas. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Rtm Taylor-Manning | 1/28/2014

    " If you're looking for more books in the vein of Surowecki's "The Wisdom of Crowds" this lightweight and superficial gloss of similar material is going to be unsatisfying. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Luke Reisdorf | 1/20/2014

    " This book will leave me thinking about why I make the choices I do... Are the circumstances altering my decisions? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elaina | 1/19/2014

    " This book definitely gets you thinking.... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Helene | 1/18/2014

    " Easy to read; was able to work through this book in a few days. I would say it was straightforward, but a lot of the book seems like a long stream-of-consciousness. I suppose that's the point the Brafman brothers are trying to make: a lot of seemingly unrelated incidents are actually related through human irrational behavior. Makes sense. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kat Young | 1/17/2014

    " i like malcolm gladwell's stuff a little better, but it's a fun little layman's trip through the psychology of why we make irrational decisions all the time. i particularly like the bit about incentives - paying people for correct answers on a test actually DECREASED their performance! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Billy | 1/15/2014

    " people do things for a variety of reasons that are not always immediately clear. quick read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Pearlli123 | 1/5/2014

    " Rather enjoyable read... very similar to books by Malcolm Gladwell. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris Ramsey | 12/23/2013

    " An intriguing look into human behavior with interesting examples of, at times, amusing and occasionally tragic outcomes. It also listed a mutlitude of behvorial studies as examples underscoring the points it was making. A great companion to Malcom Gladwell's work, such as: Blink. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kristine | 12/14/2013

    " Great, easy read. Some pretty cool studies and insights. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jason Chafin | 12/11/2013

    " Very interesting look into how we unintentionaly make irrational decisions. One of the most interesting things I learned in this book is that different cultures have differing concepts of "fairness." What may seem fair to an American might not to a Russian or the French. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sharon | 10/4/2013

    " Great book, very interesting! Includes studies about how people react, make decisions and what causes them to act that way or do what they do. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Zak | 6/24/2013

    " Not a lot of new information. Presents a series of human norms that are evidenced by a series of studies that vary widely in their targeted populations "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Holly Green | 3/16/2013

    " Interesting, good examples and an easy read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Thk | 1/12/2013

    " Short and sweet book (I finished it in about 1.5 days) about why people are motivated or demotivated in doing something. A great book for fans of Malcolm Gladwell's books "The Tipping Point" and "Blink". "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ralph | 9/19/2012

    " A lesser cousin to Freaknomics. Good for b-school aspirants and graduates and interesting. A bit too brief and without a cohesive thesis. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Robyn | 8/26/2012

    " I am referring to a fiction book by the same title by Zachary Lazar, not this one. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Patriciapayton | 7/21/2012

    " Sway would be of interest to readers who like Malcolm Gladwell or liked Predictably Irrational. It is a cross between ecomomics and social science and was a very quick read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Wai-kit | 4/18/2012

    " Promising start, but the ending was a big disappointment. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ning | 3/1/2012

    " In the same vein as Malcom Gladwell's books. A fun read regarding our decision making process and impluses. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 David Steinberg | 1/10/2012

    " Fascinating subject but doesn't add anything new. It's the same old studies revealing the same old conclusions. I think this book was summarized in an appendix in one of Gladwell's books. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michelle Gentry | 11/20/2011

    " Very interesting stuff, and a quick read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 jackie | 7/14/2011

    " If you've ever said, "I can't believe I just did that" this might explain why you did. What would make someone spend $300 for a $20 bill...? You'll get some answers here. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Niki | 5/20/2011

    " Such an interesting book with important information one should know when faced with decision making. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shaun | 5/9/2011

    " This was very interesting book along the lines of Freakonomics or anything Malcolm Gladwell writes. I found the annectdotes interesting and thought provoking. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys these types of books. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mark | 5/8/2011

    " Interesting review of our irrationality. Lots of examples, threads and well tied together examples. I would have loved more useful take-aways. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura | 5/4/2011

    " A pretty interesting read about how to persuade, sway, talk to people in life. Goes through people's choices and why they made those choices. Ranges from interview questions and answers to why Michael Jordan wasn't the first pick. It's a mildly short book, and an easy read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Fina | 4/28/2011

    " A nice comprehensive psychological explanation on irrational behaviors that we do/ decisions that we make every single day. A must read for all who's interested in a little less popular form of psychology. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Heather | 4/24/2011

    " This was a fascinating look at irrational behavior, and how we get derailed all the time. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bonnie | 4/3/2011

    " liked the concept, didn't like the writing style. Not as good as "the drunkards walk" "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Phil | 3/26/2011

    " This is a very good book that could have been great. It's a tad short and could have used more practical recommendations at the end. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Keets | 3/24/2011

    " Anybody who does interviewing should read the chapter on some of the critical biases we have when doing in-person interviews. I intend to do more research into this area. Great, easy read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mary Anne | 3/19/2011

    " I'd like to reread this. Thought-provoking. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dali | 3/8/2011

    " All well said. Now I'm mindful of my actions. Hahaha. There's no denying that we're all so emotional as humans. "

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About the Author
Author Ori Brafman

Ori Brafman is a lifelong entrepreneur. His adventures include a wireless start-up, a health-food advocacy group, and a network of CEOs working on public benefit projects, which he co-founded with Rod A. Beckstrom. He holds a BA in peace and conflict studies from the University of California at Berkeley and an MBA from Stanford Business School.

Rod A Beckstrom is a serial start-up entrepreneur. He founded CATS Software, Inc., which he took public, and has helped start and build other high-tech firms. He has served on various private and nonprofit boards. He holds a BA and an MBA from Stanford and was a Fulbright Scholar.