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Download Secret Ingredients: The New Yorker Book of Food and Drink: Unabridged Selections Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Secret Ingredients: The New Yorker Book of Food and Drink: Unabridged Selections Audiobook, by David Remnick Click for printable size audiobook cover
4.17 out of 54.17 out of 54.17 out of 54.17 out of 54.17 out of 5 4.17 (35 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: David Remnick Narrator: John Lee, Mark Bramhall, Don Leslie, Susan Denaker, Kimberly Farr, Mark Deakins, Stephen Hoye, Arthur Morey Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2007 ISBN: 9780739354360
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Since its earliest days, the New Yorker has been a tastemaker—literally. As the home of A. J. Liebling, Joseph Wechsberg, and M.F.K. Fisher, who practically invented American food writing, the magazine established a tradition that is carried forward today by irrepressible literary gastronomes, including Calvin Trillin, Bill Buford, Adam Gopnik, Jane Kramer, and Anthony Bourdain. Now, in this indispensable collection, the New Yorker dishes up a feast of delicious writing on food and drink, seasoned with a generous dash of cartoons.

Whether you’re in the mood for snacking on humor pieces and cartoons or for savoring classic profiles of great chefs and great eaters, these offerings, from every age of the New Yorker’s fabled eighty-year history, are sure to satisfy every taste. There are memoirs, short stories, tell-alls, and poems—ranging in tone from sweet to sour and in subject from soup to nuts.

M.F.K. Fisher pays homage to “cookery witches,” those mysterious cooks who possess “an uncanny power over food,” while John McPhee valiantly trails an inveterate forager and is rewarded with stewed persimmons and white-pine-needle tea. There is Roald Dahl’s famous story “Taste,” in which a wine snob’s palate comes in for some unwelcome scrutiny, and Julian Barnes’s ingenious tale of a lifelong gourmand who goes on a very peculiar diet for still more peculiar reasons. Adam Gopnik asks if French cuisine is done for, and Calvin Trillin investigates whether people can actually taste the difference between red wine and white. We journey with Susan Orlean as she distills the essence of Cuba in the story of a single restaurant, and with Judith Thurman as she investigates the arcane practices of Japan’s tofu masters. Closer to home, Joseph Mitchell celebrates the old New York tradition of the beefsteak dinner, and Mark Singer shadows the city’s foremost fisherman-chef.

Selected from the magazine’s plentiful larder, Secret Ingredients celebrates all forms of gustatory delight.

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Quotes & Awards

  • You couldn’t ask for a more diverse, dazzling collection of writers. New York Times
  • Sumptuous servings . . . intellectually delicious. Houston Chronicle
  • The book reaches its apogee with John McPhee’s 1968 profile of the legendary wild-foodist Euell Gibbons. To read this sparely elegant, moving portrait is to remember that writing well about food is really no different from writing well about life. Saveur (One of the Top Ten Reads of the Year)
  • Delicious, diverse, and satisfying . . . something to suit every appetite. Library Journal
  • This ideal collection of food-happy pieces . . . yields pleasures of all kinds. NPR’s Morning Edition
  • Simply gestational! Christian Science Fetal Monitor
  • I couldn’t put it down. So they had to deliver me by Caesarean. Michael Pritchard, three weeks old, author of Waaaaaahhhh!: The Michael Pritchard Story

Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eric | 2/20/2014

    " This book is amazing, and so much fun. I read it straight through, and I wish it were longer so that I could read more! It makes you realize that food is so essential to life, and often I would not even remember an article was about food, being so drawn in to reading about its pivotal role in our lives. Highly recommend for anyone who cares about food. Or life, for that matter. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anne Taylor | 2/13/2014

    " Loved the insights this book gave me into different places and times. Nothing like good food writing to explain history, society, politics, love and lust. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 JulieK | 2/12/2014

    " There's a lot of good stuff in the book, but it wasn't as consistently interesting to me as I expected it would be. The "Local Delicacies" section was by far my favorite. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ashley | 2/9/2014

    " I really enjoyed this collection of articles from The New Yorker. I'd say that about 80% were up my alley, but it was easy enough to skip over the ones that were just too blah. Some of my favorites included "All You Can Hold for Five Bucks" by Joseph Mitchell, "Don't Eat Before Reading This" by Anthony Bourdain, "The Secret Ingredient" and "Nor Censure Nor Disdain" by M.F.K. Fisher, "The Magic Bagel" by Calvin Trillin, "Dry Martini" by Roger Angell, pretty much anything in the Tastes Funny section, "Taste" by Roald Dahl, and "The Sorrows of Gin" by John Cheever. For anyone who likes food, The New Yorker, or good writing in general, this is definitely worth a look through. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maris Wicks | 2/8/2014

    " I really enjoyed the more current essays, although the older ones gave a curious inside to culinary sensations of long ago (like the crazy NYC "Beefsteak Dinners" of the 1930s). John McPhee's account of foraging with Euell Gibbons is absolutely incredible; Gibbons' "Stalking the Wild Asparagus" is on my to-read list. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elisabeth | 1/31/2014

    " Hey, if you like food, like to cook, or just like to read about both this is an entertaining book. Some older articles are in here, but they are still good to read. It's an easy pick up, put down book. Great bedside reading, though watch out, you might get out of bed for a snack! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Susanne | 1/29/2014

    " Intelligent and humorous articles from the New Yorker about food, cooking, eating and drinking. What's not to like? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jdbaron | 1/22/2014

    " I absolutely loved this book. I listened to the audio version, and from the very first story, I was completely hooked. Stories by and about culinary greats like Julia Child, Escoffier and MFK Fisher; topics ranging from the search for the world's greatest tofu and foraging for wild food; the history of the steakhouse from it's origins in Tammany Hall New York. The various readers were universally very good, and they kept a steady pace throughout. An absolutely must for any fan of the New Yorker or foodie. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mahria | 1/17/2014

    " Cheese nun! Raw cheese forever. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christine | 1/13/2014

    " A feast for the mind to be nibbled or devoured! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jesse | 1/1/2014

    " My husband (who is a chef) and I are reading this to one another and eating it up story by story. It is inspiring him and making me hungry. Good combo right? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Susan Sanderman | 12/23/2013

    " This collection of food writing from "The New Yorker" covers the decades from the 1930s to the 2000s. It features fiction and non-fiction, from authors both famous (Anthony Bourdain, M.F.K. Fisher, Dorothy Parker) and non-famous. I had no idea that just reading about food could be so enthralling. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lee | 12/16/2013

    " This book has been an amazing read! It's a HUGE collection of articles and there've only been a few that I didn't find totally worth reading. Glad I bought it on my kindle b/c the paperback edition looks heavy! Am almost done w/it and am feeling sad that it'll be over soon! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sharon | 12/9/2013

    " Wonderful essays, short stories, from 1920's to now. some very funny, too. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gilg | 12/3/2013

    " still bouncing back and forth in my love hate relationship with all things new york and new yorker. Currently trending to hate. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bryan Rucker | 5/21/2013

    " Most of them are great, but anything by Dorothy Parker or Calvin Trillin makes me pee my pants "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lance | 4/4/2013

    " Good book to pick up read an article, put down and pick it up again. All and all a good read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Maureen | 11/2/2012

    " Entertaining, but definitely not something to look forward to before bed. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Liz V | 7/29/2012

    " As always, The New Yorker fills us up with good things. Esecially love Trillin and Bourdain at his snarkiest. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Melissa | 7/14/2012

    " If you can get past the first few chapters written by annoying Francophiles, the rest of the compilation is a great read. The variety of writing is worth the time with some truly compelling works combined with some really creative ones. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Karen Eitzman | 4/18/2012

    " Great essays about food and drink, by some unusual people! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah | 10/18/2011

    " Once I got past the first section, which had a terrible pox of italics, all was well (despite what appears to be a significant overrepresentation of seafood). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ted | 10/9/2011

    " Indispensable collection of food writing and fantastic writing. AJ Liebling is the sh*t. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Thaddeus Croyle | 8/12/2011

    " Considering how thick this was, I only skipped one article (not counting the few I'd already read elsewhere). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christopher | 7/31/2011

    " Fantastic writing about discovering the pleasures of the palette...what could be better??? I read the "New Yorker" every week, but I look forward to their annual "Food Issue" with great anticipation. This collection will make you drool. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Katie Green | 5/21/2011

    " Some essays are more dry than others...but most are very very funny. Esp. the modern food writers. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jeanne | 4/18/2011

    " a lovely romp thru the new yorkers collection of columns about food. i love the magazine and enjoyed this collection "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Virginia | 3/5/2011

    " A collection of New York writings and cartoons about food and drink. An appetizing browse. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lance | 2/14/2011

    " Good book to pick up read an article, put down and pick it up again. All and all a good read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Peg | 1/24/2011

    " Keeping to the high standards of The New Yorker Magazine, these essays and a smattering of food related cartoons for spice will have you smiling, chuckling, and guffawing. Wonderful collection.
    "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christine | 1/11/2011

    " A feast for the mind to be nibbled or devoured! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Whitney | 12/30/2010

    " I had to return this to the library before I finished it, but I enjoyed most of the essays I read. I'll probably pick it up again sometime. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Melissa | 11/22/2010

    " If you can get past the first few chapters written by annoying Francophiles, the rest of the compilation is a great read. The variety of writing is worth the time with some truly compelling works combined with some really creative ones. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Clark | 9/27/2010

    " I liked it for the reasons that I did and hated it for reasons similar. Food writing is stupid, but so is everything else. Woody Allen's piece is very funny. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Christie | 4/2/2010

    " Liked everything but the fiction. How does the New Yorker's fiction manage to infuriate me so much? "

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About the Author
Author David Remnick

David Remnick is the editor of the New Yorker. He began his career as a sportswriter for the Washington Post and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1994 for Lenin’s Tomb. He is also the author of Resurrection and The Devil Problem and Other True Stories, a collection of essays. He lives in New York City with his wife and three children.

About the Narrators

John Lee, a stage actor and writer and a coproducer of feature films, has narrated more than one hundred audiobooks of every conceivable genre, earning some three dozen Earphones Awards and the prestigious Audie Award.

Mark Bramhall has won eighteen AudioFile Earphones Awards and has twice been a finalist for the Audiobook Publishers Association’s prestigious Audie Award for best narration. He has been named by Publishers Weekly and AudioFile magazine among their “Best Voices of the Year” in 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013. He is also an award-winning actor whose acting credits include off-Broadway, regional, and many Los Angeles venues as well as television, animation, and feature films. He has taught and directed at the American Academy of Dramatic Art.

Don Leslie has appeared on Broadway, off Broadway, and in regional theaters throughout the country. He has been heard in thousands of commercials, promos for all the broadcast networks and most cable stations, political campaigns, movie trailers, and over fifty audiobooks.

Susan Denaker is an actress and Earphones Award–winning narrator. Her extensive theater credits include numerous plays in the West End of London, national tours, many English rep companies, including a season with Alan Ayckbourn’s company in Scarborough. In the US, she has appeared in Our Town and Sweet Bird of Youth at the La Jolla Playhouse and Breaking Legs at the Westport Playhouse.

Kimberly Farr is an actress and eight-time winner of the AudioFile Earphones Award for narration. She has appeared on Broadway and at the New York Shakespeare Festival, the Roundabout Theatre, Playwright’s Horizons, and the American Place. She created the role of “Eve” in Arthur Miller’s first and only musical, Up from Paradise, which was directed by the author. She appeared with Vanessa Redgrave in the Broadway production of The Lady from the Sea and has acted in regional theaters across the country, including a performance in the original production of The 1940’s Radio Hour at Washington, DC’s Arena Stage.

Mark Deakins is an actor whose television appearances include Head Case, Star Trek: Voyager, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. His film credits include Intervention, Star Trek: Insurrection, and The Devil’s Advocate. He recently wrote, directed, and produced the short film The Smith Interviews.

Stephen Hoye has worked as a professional actor in London and Los Angeles for more than thirty years. Trained at Boston University and the Guildhall in London, he has acted in television series and six feature films and has appeared in London’s West End.

Arthur Morey has won three AudioFile Magazine “Best Of” Awards: in 2011 for Biography and History, in for History and Historical Fiction, and in 2009 for Nonfiction and Culture. His work has also garnered multiple AudioFile Earphones awards, and he has been nominated for an Audie Award. He graduated from Harvard and did graduate work at the University of Chicago. He has won awards for his fiction and drama, worked as an editor with several book publishers, and taught literature and writing at Northwestern University. As a narrator, he has received nineteen AudioFile Earphones Awards and been a finalist for the prestigious Audie Award.