Extended Audio Sample

Download American Notes Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample American Notes (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Charles Dickens
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (244 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Charles Dickens Narrator: Angela Cheyne Publisher: Books on Tape Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 1999 ISBN:
Coming Soon! We're adding audiobooks daily and hope to make this one available for download very soon. Submit your vote below to let us know you really crave this title!
Vote this up! This audiobook has 0 votes

Charles Dickens made the first of 3 trips to the United States in 1842, when he was 30 and already famous, having written several novels including The Pickwick Papers. This book begins dockside in London and recounts his escapades throughout his journey in a witty and conversational style, with his characteristic irreverence. This work will make Americans acknowledge the debt owed by Twain, Mencken, and others to Dickens, the foremost man of letters of his day. Download and start listening now!

BK_BKOT_000002

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mary | 2/17/2014

    " Dickens did not like America on his initial visit in the early 1840s. He describes his disgust at seeing herds of pigs roaming the streets of New York, expresses doubts about the climate of Washington, D.C., decries the national habit of spitting tobacco, and insists that he condemns American politics and the American press in order to make "the Truth" generally known. His denunciation of (almost) all things American was re-imagined in his novel, Martin Chuzzlewit, in which he sends his main character to a Jamestown-esque swamp apparently located in the middle of Ohio (where the character sickens, nearly dies, and comes to an appreciation of his superior British identity.) The novel is funny; this book was not. Dickens is pompous and judgmental, very much a mid-Victorian male. In this book one is forced to spend a great deal of time with him, which I did not particularly enjoy. For example - on the stormy passage over, Dickens explains that the terrible weather had an upside in that his wife was too ill to talk to him. Ugh. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dee Rose | 2/8/2014

    " I enjoyed this book. He was surprisingly very witty and I found myself chuckling several times. He's a brilliant writer and sometimes it feels like you're reading a fictional story then you remember this actually all happened to him over 100 years ago. It's pretty neat. Plus, his vocabulary was remarkable... I think anyone who reads this is bound to learn a handful of new words. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Wordwizard | 1/31/2014

    " Highly enjoyable. Much is still relevant today! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Christopher | 1/22/2014

    " enlightening look at earlier times in America, as observed by an astute and funny Dickens "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 July | 1/17/2014

    " Este libro esta escrito de la manera en que yo escribo mi blog, me ha gustado mucho <3 "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 K | 11/26/2013

    " Interesting to read about how physically difficult it was to travel overland in 1837 "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Suzy | 8/1/2013

    " Not everything Dickens mentions about his travels to America is interesting, but the parts that are interesting are extraordinarily so. A fascinating look at what America was like 1842 through the eyes of an eloquent foreigner. Many very funny parts as well. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Patricia | 7/18/2013

    " I've read several books by Dickens, and this is my favorite. He's not really complimentary of the United States as he observed it, but some of his opinions were warranted. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Even | 6/28/2013

    " Dickens' travelogue begins lightly, but the humour quickly devolves into cloying and annoying. Much of his interest is in the public institutions of America, but his descriptions are dull and condescending. This one is generallly bereft of anything interesting or informative. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Anne | 3/15/2012

    " It was ok. Driven by his own prejudices and with some questionable facts at times. Funny at times. The chapter on slavery at the end is worth reading even if you don't read the whole book. Still, Dickens should have stuck with fiction. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michael | 2/11/2012

    " Good travel literature and true to the author's curiosity. However, this will bring the reader to a more bombastic side of Dickens than expected. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Vickie | 1/11/2012

    " Not as good as Mark Twain but I loved his outlooks. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 nacchi | 5/8/2011

    " I only read half of it, snippets for a seminar at university, but I really enjoyed Dickens' account of his travels. He is wonderfully funny, albeit critical and it is a joy to read this travelogue. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Patricia | 4/24/2011

    " I've read several books by Dickens, and this is my favorite. He's not really complimentary of the United States as he observed it, but some of his opinions were warranted. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Leora | 1/10/2011

    " In the 19th century this was offensive to Americans and boring to Britons. Today, to this American, half is boring and half is beautifully written and dead right. Glad that schoolwork forced me into this one. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Anne | 5/12/2010

    " It was ok. Driven by his own prejudices and with some questionable facts at times. Funny at times. The chapter on slavery at the end is worth reading even if you don't read the whole book. Still, Dickens should have stuck with fiction. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Iamapremo | 1/6/2010

    " Good travel literature and true to the author's curiosity. However, this will bring the reader to a more bombastic side of Dickens than expected. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Even | 9/23/2009

    " Dickens' travelogue begins lightly, but the humour quickly devolves into cloying and annoying. Much of his interest is in the public institutions of America, but his descriptions are dull and condescending. This one is generallly bereft of anything interesting or informative. "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author
Author Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens (1812–1870) was born in Landport, Portsmouth, England, the second of eight children in a family continually plagued by debt. A legacy brought release from the nightmare of debtors’ prison and child labor and afforded him a few years of formal schooling. He worked as an attorney’s clerk and newspaper reporter until his early writings brought him the amazing success that was to be his for the remainder of his life. He was the most popular English novelist of the Victorian era, and he remains popular, responsible for some of English literature’s most iconic characters.