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Download Where Angels Fear to Tread Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Where Angels Fear to Tread Audiobook, by E. M. Forster Click for printable size audiobook cover
3.55 out of 53.55 out of 53.55 out of 53.55 out of 53.55 out of 5 3.55 (22 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: E. M. Forster Narrator: Edward Petherbridge Publisher: Blackstone Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2009 ISBN: 9781482979060
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When attractive, impulsive, English widow Lilia takes a holiday in Italy, she causes a scandal by marrying Gino, a dashing and highly unsuitable Italian twelve years her junior. Her prim, snobbish in-laws make no attempt to hide their disapproval, and when Lilia’s decision eventually brings disaster, her English relatives embark on an expedition to face the uncouth foreigner. But when they are confronted by the beauty of Italy and the charm and vitality of the disreputable Gino, they are forced to examine their own narrow lives. Their reactions are emotional, violent, and unexpected. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “As enveloping as any of the other Forster books.”

    New York Times

  • “Startlingly original…At once fantastic and inevitable.”

    Guardian (London)

Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Karen | 2/18/2014

    " Ugh. Awful people being awful to one another and taking no responsibility when it all turns tragic. 1001 list. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Carsten Thomsen | 2/10/2014

    " I loved Room With a View and Howards End. My expectations were high but the book did not come close to the other two masterpieces. There were no persons to like in this tale - it left me cold and indifferent - couldn't wait for the italien wailing and the english prudishness to end. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dianabanana Lind | 2/7/2014

    " I'd never read Forster before. Now I feel compelled to go and read all his novels. This is perfect summer reading -- a nice critique of English society. Very succinct writing style, but great characterizations. Makes you feel that the bear-hug of American letters (a la Whitman, Melville and their 20th century followers/interpreters) could use a dose of English stoicism. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Denis | 2/2/2014

    " Forster's less famous novel - and yet, all that makes him one of the greatest writers of the English language is already there. His uncompromising view of British society, his way of writing what could be called "romantic" stories without any fake sentimentalism, his complex characters which are not necessarily likable but always riveting, the sure hand with which tragedy unfolds in an almost ordinary way, the curious (but always right on target) way with which lighter elements mix with serious ones: yes, it's all here in this strange, cruel, unusual novel about British people and their fatal infatuation for Italy (and what a strange vision of Italy's men and culture Forster has!) A great read from start to finish. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anna | 1/31/2014

    " Some insight, some hilarity, some boring bits. Recommended overall. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 HD | 1/28/2014

    " It suits my personality to read about people being transfigured by trips abroad, which is partly what this book is about. This may sound twee to some, but I think the things E.M. Forster says about how individuals interact with others and, also, with culture are on very solid ground. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Denise | 1/7/2014

    " Cultures clash with sometimes amusing, but ultimately tragic consequences in E.M. Forster's short and well-written first novel. Now if only there were at least one character that's actually likable in this book - Lilia had a few great moments that had me cheering her on in the very beginning, but that was about it. The rest of them I couldn't feel any sympathy for at all. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Donna | 1/5/2014

    " Lunchtime reading fare (no pun intended!!)on dailylit... "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Charles Bell | 11/27/2013

    " I was not impressed with the story. I ended up disgusted with the British characters. You have to get past page 110 for the book to be interesting. As a satire it is successful. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rachel Bayles | 10/4/2013

    " A mediation on the absurd hopelessness of life. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julie Bowerman | 6/28/2013

    " When young widow Lilia makes what her inlaws consider bad choices on a trip to Italy, her brother-in-law Philip, sister-in-law Harriet and her younger but prim friend Caroline Abbott dash to Italy to put things right with a pomposity that that endures but rarely outwits. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rachael | 6/18/2013

    " This book is totally worth the read for the batshit insane ending!!! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sara | 12/2/2012

    " Reads like a first novel, but it's still Forster. And about the whole Italy/England dichotomy, connection, attraction. But it really bothers me that there's no accountability for the tragedy at the end. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Hannah | 7/30/2012

    " Read with my students years ago. Enjoyed. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anya | 7/13/2010

    " Wow, my mind is blown by this book.Forster portrays ordinary people like no other author that I know. This novel is absolutely captivating, the language is fantastic. It's also real and personal. The transformation that protagonists went through is absolutely amazing. The ending had me in tears. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Patti | 10/19/2005

    " I love the Victorian Histrionics of EM Forster. Always very tragic and engaging "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Steve | 8/24/2005

    " Ahh, some early 20th C British sensibility - just what I needed! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Stuart King | 5/1/2005

    " Jeeeeez the ending is a killer..........you can see where Roald Dahl got some of his inspiration! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Leslie | 4/25/2002

    " I'm usually a fan of Forster. Not this one, however. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 February Four | 3/17/2002

    " Liked it, but oh god, so depressing. T_T "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Frances | 9/1/2000

    " A captivating story of Italy as seen through English eyes. I liked Room With a View more but found this to be a good addition. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Robert | 4/30/2000

    " One of Forster's deceptively light novels like Room with a View...much more there than immediately meets the eye, though nothing of the density of Howards End and Passage to India. Very good read. "

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About the Author

Edward Morgan Forster (1879–1970) was born in London and raised by his mother and paternal aunts. He pursued his interests in philosophy and classics at Cambridge and there began his writing. He wrote six novels, short stories, essays, and other nonfiction. He is known for his liberal humanism, notably exemplified in his greatest novel, A Passage to India.

About the Narrator

Edward Petherbridge’s theater experience is extensive. He originated the role of Guildenstern in the original production of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, and he has been nominated for two Tony Awards, one for Nicholas Nickleby and the other for Strange Interlude. For the latter he also received an Olivier Award. His television and film credits include Gulliver’s Travels, An Awfully Big Adventure, No Strings, and Lord Peter Wimsey.