Extended Audio Sample

Download A Passage to India Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample A Passage to India (Unabridged) Audiobook, by E. M. Forster
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (25,646 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: E. M. Forster Narrator: Sam Dastor Publisher: AudioGO Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: September 2009 ISBN:
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What really happened to Miss Quested in the Marabar Caves? This tantalising question provides the intense drama of racial tension at the centre of Foster's last and greatest novel. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jenna Mills | 2/10/2014

    " As a work written in his time, this is truly ground-breaking. It is well written (hence the reason it's a classic!) and the characters are developed in a most believable way. What I did not like was the fact that I couldn't relate, and therefore couldn't empathise with any of them. Not that surprising I suppose. Even so, I felt as though this novel was more of a work of art than a 'good read'. Aside from the court case, not a whole lot happened, and, through my own personal choice, I don't like that in a book, or a film either, come to that. I didn't leave the book with a feeling that something had been resolved, or dwelling on the characters, but it did make me think about colonial India, and all its consequences. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kris | 2/10/2014

    " A great read - takes place a few decades before India's independence from the British. A English woman accuses an Indian man of rape. Even though she is not a racist and was friendly with this man when she befalls to violence she accuses one of them. I enjoyed both the movie and book and found it scary how misunderstandings can cause such turmoil. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 A. Paulina | 1/28/2014

    " I finally realized why this is such a classic. Foster is a master of prose. A most read for all of those interested in fiction and the social interactions between different races, social classes and religions. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Claudia | 1/27/2014

    " This is one that I've wanted to read for a while, and I must say that I wish that I had read it in college when I was in the hight of my intellectual brain (vs. my current out-of-critical-thinking-practice mommy brain). I'm definitely glad I read it for a book club, however, so that I had other people to throw ideas around with. One thing that I loved about this novel is that one could easily trade out any number of scenarios from our own country to still feel the relevance of this book today (race relations of white America vs. Native Americans, African Americans, and even post-9/11 Muslim stereotypes today). Some of the reading is slow going, but I enjoyed that the novel covers both sides of the racial divide, neither side is perfect, and the variety of characters means that you could probably identify (at least partially) with at least one character. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tali | 1/22/2014

    " I almost feel bad for not thinking this book was a 5 star book. I thought the characters were slightly one dimensional--representing entire classes of people. This helped them to be both complex (a class is a complex thing) and superficial (a class has so many prescriptions). I was unimpressed by the representation of women in the book, and I had a hard time overcoming that. I don't know why I don't have a hard time overcoming that with Hemingway. Some of the prose was gorgeous. The dialogue was at times unparalleled. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nicole-Anne Keyton | 1/16/2014

    " Not my favourite Forster novel, because my feelings will always stay true to A Room With a View, but this is a close second. Forster is quite ahead of his time on dealing with cultural diversity and the foreseeable fall of the British Empire. Also, I love how this novel sets itself apart from Forster's other romantic works set in England. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Berto | 1/12/2014

    " A remarkably interesting and insightful novel. Takes a little effort to get into it but once you do you can't help but be absorbed by the characters and settings created by Forster. Each character has their virtues and flaws and each perspective can be understood. It is impressive how Forster's story of hopeful harmony amid a chaotic world can still have value today, more than half a century after it was published. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Heather | 1/9/2014

    " I loved this book years and years ago. I tried reading it again a couple years ago and could not get into it. I still recommend it though. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Susan | 12/18/2013

    " This was a rereading, possibly for the third time. But the first reading was a long time ago, and I decided it was time to read it again. I really like reading about the British in India, and this book is excellent in depicting the years just before the end of the Raj (it's set in the 1920s). "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Hannah Finch | 12/11/2013

    " I first this book for pleasure then had to read it as study which rather ruined it for me. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Barbara | 12/8/2013

    " Loved it. Class and racial prejudices take center stage. A classic, and rightly so. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Struggling Writer | 12/4/2013

    " I was pretty late to this book, but it is a great read. Definitely survived the passage of time well with a very relevant messaged couched in great writing. Read it now! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Hagar | 1/20/2013

    " Colonial/Post-colonial novel! The White man who was once a coloniser will never be able to bridge the gap between the once-colonised! A stereotypical depiction of the Orient ! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Scott | 11/24/2012

    " Meh. Classic literature and all that, but glad it is done. Now I am sorry that I am making my students read it. Maybe they will know that there is a movie out there that would be a great substitute. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Roselyn Robison | 11/19/2012

    " Some fascinating elements about culture, but not a real page turner. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Lily | 4/29/2012

    " I think the fact that I put down this book after a quarter of the way through shows you how much of a dissapointment it was. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Teresa | 1/21/2012

    " Excellent and the movie breathtaking "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marion | 10/27/2011

    " I listened to this book a second time to get a deeper feel for each character. The book is complicated with many characters with unfamiliar names, but the themes of race, class, religion, and gender play out in a complex plot that foreshadow India's ultimate move toward independent rule. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sholeen | 8/6/2011

    " Sort of depressing but then I can delude myself into thinking things have changed and are still changing (embarrassing being white sometimes) "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Deanna | 5/20/2011

    " I don't think I'm smart enough for this. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ashley | 5/14/2011

    " ... What can I say, I enjoyed it. Not as much as Maurice (it is a completely different type of novel), but I liked it none the less. Somehow, Forster managed to capture the ...vastness and unknown that is often associated with India/the Orient ... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alberto | 5/11/2011

    " Time Magazine said "What he demonstrates here, in a story of the greatest and saddest subtleties — and comic subtleties, too — is how nearly impossible that is to do." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Charlie | 5/6/2011

    " An insightful depiction of Anglo-Indian relations during British rule of India. A sumptuous and enduring classic. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bonnie | 5/1/2011

    " the race relations in this book make me feel icky.
    i've been able to see what's coming for PAGES and the characters are frustratingly naive... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Randa | 5/1/2011

    " one of my best novel to forster but still i like his essay What i belive the most "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Christina | 4/27/2011

    " I had trouble getting through it, but it mostly redeemed itself by about page 150. It took me weeks to get through the first half, and a day to finish. I think I don't particularly like his prose- overly detailed; it felt oppressive. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Christian | 4/21/2011

    " I don't recall much of what I read, though I just watched the film version and liked it very much. Maybe I should try it again, now that I've spent a little time in India... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Pattersonjh | 4/14/2011

    " Fantastic. Heavy, breath taking prose. "

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About the Author

Edward Morgan Forster (1879–1970) was born in London and raised by his mother and paternal aunts. He pursued his interests in philosophy and classics at Cambridge and there began his writing. He wrote six novels, short stories, essays, and other nonfiction. He is known for his liberal humanism, notably exemplified in his greatest novel, A Passage to India.

About the Narrator

Sam Dastor studied English at Cambridge and trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. His early theatrical experience includes a spell at the National Theatre under Sir Laurence Olivier and time spent acting in the West End. For the Royal Shakespeare Company, he has been seen in Timon of Athens, Tales from Ovid, and a world tour of A Servant to Two Masters. His many television appearances include I, Claudius; Yes, Minister; Mountbatten; Julius Caesar; and Fortunes of War. He has also appeared in the films Made, Jinnah, and Such a Long Journey, recorded over a thousand broadcasts for the BBC, and narrated numerous audio books.