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Extended Audio Sample “What Do You Care What Other People Think?”: Further Adventures of a Curious Character Audiobook, by Richard P. Feynman Click for printable size audiobook cover
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (6,858 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Richard P. Feynman Narrator: Raymond Todd Publisher: Blackstone Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: January 2006 ISBN: 9781455182756
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One of the greatest theoretical physicists of the twentieth century, Richard Feynman possessed an unquenchable thirst for adventure and an unparalleled ability to tell the stories of his life. “What Do You Care What Other People Think?” is Feynman’s last literary legacy, prepared with his friend and fellow drummer, Ralph Leighton.

Among the book’s many tales, we meet Feynman’s first wife, Arlene, who taught him love’s irreducible mystery as she lay dying in a hospital bed while he worked nearby on the atomic bomb at Los Alamos. We are also given a fascinating chronicle of the investigation of the space shuttle Challenger’s explosion in 1986, and we relive the moment when Feynman revealed the disaster’s cause by an elegant experiment: dropping a ring of rubber into a glass of cold water and pulling it out, misshapen.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “Feynman’s voice echoes raw and direct through these pages.”

    New York Times Book Review

  • “By the evidence of this book alone, it is clear that [Feynman] was an original, brilliant, curious, energetic, eclectic, ebullient, gregarious, and consummately iconoclastic human being with a passion for science, a taste for first principles, and a view of reality that was uniquely his. When he discusses what he really loved, his natural genius shines through.”

    Washington Post

  • “Readers...will be happy to find this in their libraries.”

    Library Journal

  • A New York Times Bestseller

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Andrew | 2/20/2014

    " Not as good as Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman. But of course that's a high standard. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mary Beth Laychak | 2/8/2014

    " The sequel to "Surely You're Joking", more stories of Feynman's life. This book includes a segment on the Challenger investigation. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Pkiszk | 2/4/2014

    " not that good as surely you're joking but still an interesting read. a comprehensive summary of the challanger investigation. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ernest | 2/2/2014

    " Richard P Feynman may now be one of my new intellectual inspirations. This collection of short thoughts and memories describes several points in his life. Additionally, he reveals the behind the scenes workings of the Challenger investigation. Throughout it all, his pure thinking, individual (almost idiosyncratic) way of approaching the world and his love for science are clear. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Slawa | 2/1/2014

    " This is the 2nd of Feynman's memoirs and I really enjoy his style. His books have a lot of historical context information as well as his personal opinion about absolutely everything which I find really entertaining. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rhonda | 1/22/2014

    " This is more of Richard Feynman at his best. Although I have no reason to doubt that Feynman was a blatant narcissist,these writings are nevertheless important to understanding modern physics.. as well as some other oddities about one of Physics' most curious characters. This book is extremely funny and thought provoking and extremely interesting. If nothing else, this book is a wonderful means of understanding how to develop one's own self esteem. You begin to undesrstand how simple interest in problems took this man to a wonderful and brilliant career. You don't even have to know any science to read it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Wenjun | 1/19/2014

    " Feynman has an Interesting personality. All through all his life he is honest to himself . "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julian | 1/10/2014

    " The first three stories and the last are amazing, but the rest is just ok. It's not as fun as first book, but I recommend it for those 4 adventures. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Karen Heart | 1/10/2014

    " Very good. I really enjoyed reading this. Eager to get my hands on the book that came before this. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Iris | 1/9/2014

    " great follow-up, tho half the book is dedicated to his advisory in the challenger shuttle disaster and thus a bit more intense. but it's all good with the inclusion of his manifesto, "the value of science" -- that one is pure gold. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bluepard | 12/27/2013

    " Silly, fun, and touching. I have to admit that I skipped the science parts in favor of the stories. But it still made me think, despite my reading it purely for entertainment. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Randy | 12/21/2013

    " Much insight into NASA and the Challenger explosion and the congressional investigation "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tyler | 12/7/2013

    " This is worth picking up just for the second section on the challenger disaster. I was kind of sad about it afterwards, but inspired to learn more about shuttles, etc. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 J. Pablo | 9/15/2013

    " Again Feynman doesn't disappoint. A curious character indeed... and such a sharp mind. I would have loved to talked with him. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Greig | 8/31/2013

    " A little bit rambling in places, but the chapter on the Challenger disaster commission was really compelling and a case study of what can happen when poor communication and external pressures get the better of science and engineering. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tom | 9/25/2012

    " Oh Mr Feynman you fox! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Josh Dalzell | 6/15/2012

    " I love Richard Feynman. He has a very solid grasp on how the world works. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 srdjan | 4/5/2012

    " What a guy. What a great person. A less breezy read than surely youre joking, and definitely a collection of b sides relative to the original. Only exceptions are the more touching parts that deal with his relationship with his wife. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David Johansson | 1/1/2012

    " Just like Surely you're joking, Mr. Feynman? this is an inspiring book. Amusing anecdotes, personal letters and the Challenger NASA story all give glimpses of the curiosity and philosophy of Feynman. A very string recommendation. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Katherine | 12/9/2011

    " Changed how I thought about the world. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Adrian Colesberry | 8/28/2011

    " While I was working in pharmaceutical manufacturing management, I pretty much based my whole philosophy of management on his analysis of the Challenger disaster. Genius. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Graham Mumm | 8/20/2011

    " Bit redundant from his first book but still full of good stories and insights from a brilliant man. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cheryl Petersen | 6/21/2011

    " Feynman is too accepting of what comes his way. Agreed, we shouldn't change our course because of what others think, but sometimes what others think is worth considering. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bob | 3/20/2011

    " Good book about a great man. Feynman's accounting of his position on the Challenger accident review board perfectly illustrates how bureacracy can so easily mask incompetency by just moving slowly. Like Carl Sagan, Feynman seems like the kind of man I would really have enjoyed talking to. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Franky | 2/21/2011

    " It was a great read, especially the first part. The end is focused on the Challenger disaster, very interesting but I find it a little boring. Neverthless, it left a good message, like all Feynman's books. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brittany | 2/16/2011

    " After reading this book, I really wish I had someone like Richard Fernman in my life. Reading about his antics will have to suffice. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rakesh | 2/15/2011

    " Most part of the book is dedicated to his work in the Space shuttle failure case..

    Chapter 2 was wonderful.. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Clay | 2/1/2011

    " Feynman is more introspective in this one, compared to Surely Your Joking Mr. Feynman. I enjoy his introspection, but I do not love his books.

    However, I feel like the epilogue in this book is worth the read itself. I wish the entire book took the tone of the epilogue. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julian | 1/29/2011

    " The first three stories and the last are amazing, but the rest is just ok. It's not as fun as first book, but I recommend it for those 4 adventures. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Paul | 1/27/2011

    " Not as good as other books I've read by Feynman; felt like a memoir, dictated and not heavily edited; major focus on Space Shuttle Challenger investigation. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ethan | 12/21/2010

    " While definitely not as good as Surely You're Joking, this book is still fairly interesting, especially Feynman's work on the Challenger disaster.

    For some reason, Feynman's narrative style reminds me of Holden Caulfield. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Frank | 11/25/2010

    " Clear and readable with insights into RF's thought processes. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Heather | 11/6/2010

    " The parts about his wife show a human side to Feynman you don't see in the rest of his writing, where he pretty much comes across as a dick. (And I say that, of course, with the utmost of respect for a great man.) "

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About the Author
Author Richard P. Feynman
Richard P. Feynman was raised in Far Rockaway, New York, and received his Ph.D. from Princeton. He held professorships at both Cornell and the California Institute of Technology. In 1965 he received the Nobel Prize for his work on quantum electrodynamics. He died in 1988.
About the Narrator

Raymond Todd is an actor and director in the theater as well as a poet and documentary filmmaker. He plays jazz trombone for the Leatherstocking quartet, an ensemble that gets its name from one of his favorite Blackstone narrations, The Deerslayer. Todd lives in New York.