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Download The Town That Food Saved: How One Community Found Vitality in Local Food Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Town That Food Saved: How One Community Found Vitality in Local Food Audiobook, by Ben Hewitt Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (420 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Ben Hewitt Narrator: Arthur Morey Publisher: Blackstone Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: November 2010 ISBN: 9781455199648
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Over the past several years, Hardwick, Vermont, a typical hardscrabble farming community of three thousand residents, has jump-started its economy and redefined its self-image through a local, self-sustaining food system unlike anything else in America. Even as the recent financial downturn threatens to cripple small businesses and privately owned farms, a stunning number of food-based businesses have grown in the region—Vermont Soy, Jasper Hill Farm, Pete’s Greens, Patchwork Farm & Bakery, Applecheek Farm, Claire’s Restaurant and Bar, and Bonnieview Farm, to name only a few. The mostly young entrepreneurs have created a network of community support, meeting regularly to share advice, equipment, and business plans and to loan each other capital. Hardwick is fast becoming a model for other communities hoping to replicate its success.

Hewitt, a journalist and Vermonter, delves deeply into the repercussions of this groundbreaking approach to growing food, both its astounding successes and potential limitations. The captivating story of a small town coming back to life, The Town That Food Saved is narrative nonfiction at its best, full of colorful characters and grounded in an idea that will revolutionize the way we eat.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “A pleasurable, almost gossipy read.”

    San Francisco Chronicle

  • “This is a smart and lovely book about a smart and lovely experiment.”

    Bill McKibben, author of Deep Economy

  • “Adroitly balancing professional neutrality with personal commitment, Hewitt engagingly examines this paradigm shift in the way a community feeds its citizens.”

    Booklist

  • “The literary tone and humor make this book more accessible and entertaining.”

    School Library Journal

  • “Narrator Arthur Morey recounts the writer’s journeys to inspect small operations that exemplify the parochial shift. His quiet voice fits the demeanor of the message, written in first person, by the tranquil reporter. Meeting the farmers in many interviews gives listeners an intimate portrait of the commitment and emotions behind this remedy for the nation’s dwindling food supply.”

    AudioFile

  • “Audie-nominated narrator Arthur Morey, with a clean, well-paced reading, sounds very much the way listeners might imagine Vermont resident and farmer Hewitt sounds. He makes this important work most accessible and entertaining.”

    SoundCommentary.com

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Donna | 2/7/2014

    " A story about Hardwick Vermont where the aging 70's back-to-the-landers clash with a new breed of agripreneurs who are creating a new, smaller, more local food economy in an area not unlike where I live in Maine. Hewitt deals with the need to blend these co-existing groups and while he does not come to a clear conclusion because this new food economy is a work in progress everywhere, he does a good job of visiting and describing the varying outlooks on the Vermont farm economy. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Jenny | 2/3/2014

    " I couldn't finish the book--I bailed out around page 60. The writing was just not good. The story would have been better as a long magazine article (stories about Hardwick, VT have been published in Gourmet and Eating Well). Better books have been written about local food vs. Big Agriculture. Get one of those instead of this. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jennifer | 1/31/2014

    " Interesting and food for thought (no pun intended) about the whole locavore movement. I was especially intrigued to learn that the University of Maine has a School of Compost ... for real, not the kind of compost you might be thinking :) "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Lisa Van Oosterum | 1/30/2014

    " meh. The town hasn't been saved yet, so the title is a bit misleading and the format is a bit tough to get into. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Melissa Robinson | 1/26/2014

    " An interesting story, I enjoyed reading the Hardwick's story and hearing (literally, I listened to the audio book of this) about the small agricultural businesses and their ethics. Unfortunately, the author tries far too hard to be clever, which distracts from the story at almost every turn. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Aldra | 1/25/2014

    " The book had far too much of the ol' Passive Aggressive Airing of Grievances for my taste. I'm amazed that he would speak in such patronizing terms about folks who live in his community. Despite his many (many, many, oh god so damned many) cheap, irrelevant shots at "characters" in this tale, he does a fairly decent job of detailing just how complicated this whole notion of local food systems truly is. Had he laid off the passive aggressive crap and stuck to the complications, both positive and negative, of creating a vibrant local food system and economy, it would have been a much better read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Virginia | 1/17/2014

    " Interesting book with small town feel and draw - I enjoyed reminiscing about my childhood. Brings some valid points to the table to say the least however felt a bit too hypothetical and heady for me at times. Overall pretty good ride. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Caroljean | 12/15/2013

    " This story needed a different storyteller. The author is so caught up in himself and big egos like his, he misses the real story: how we can create vibrant community in the local but larger than a circle of neighbors kind of way. Bad bookclub choice. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kim Phipps | 11/25/2013

    " Interesting book about a small town in Vermont and the local food movement. If you liked Food Inc. or Omnivore's Dilemma, you'll enjoy this one. A quick afternoon read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Marieke | 10/18/2013

    " Never knew any of this! Mostly stuff you already know but never hurts to be reminded of, just to get you to try a little harder to live sustainably. The fact that it is a town in VT makes it hit home all the more. Some interesting characters. Little on the dry side at times. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Josh Carver-brown | 4/15/2013

    " A great book about the power of food and small town community. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jeanie | 10/11/2012

    " This book addresses a lot of the contradictions in the local food movement I feel that others ignore,and it's the funniest non-fiction I have read in a long time. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Junio | 9/12/2012

    " Read the first half. It's well written, but it falls into that class of books by journalists that repeat everything twice. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Karen | 8/4/2012

    " This is a fascinating look at farming, local food, and agrepreneurs in Hardwick, a small (population: 3,200) town in Vermont. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lynne | 1/4/2012

    " can't wait to visit Craftsbury! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cfgk | 6/25/2011

    " Do I get a "read" if I got within 25 pages of the end? I just can't pick it up again...maybe later, but it needs to come off this list now. Good book, Ben! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Melissa | 6/21/2011

    " An interesting story, I enjoyed reading the Hardwick's story and hearing (literally, I listened to the audio book of this) about the small agricultural businesses and their ethics. Unfortunately, the author tries far too hard to be clever, which distracts from the story at almost every turn. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jennifer | 5/19/2011

    " Interesting and food for thought (no pun intended) about the whole locavore movement. I was especially intrigued to learn that the University of Maine has a School of Compost ... for real, not the kind of compost you might be thinking :) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Josh | 5/4/2011

    " A great book about the power of food and small town community. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Caroljean | 4/28/2011

    " This story needed a different storyteller. The author is so caught up in himself and big egos like his, he misses the real story: how we can create vibrant community in the local but larger than a circle of neighbors kind of way. Bad bookclub choice. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Louise | 12/14/2010

    " great "food" for thought...presents many sides to the local food system.... "

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About the Author

Ben Hewitt was born in northwestern Vermont and raised in a two-room cabin. He now lives with his wife and two sons on a diversified, forty-acre farm in Vermont where they produce dairy, beef, pork, lamb, vegetables, and berries. His work has appeared in numerous magazines and newspapers, including Best Life, Men’s Journal, National Geographic Adventure, New York Times Magazine, Outside, and Skiing.

About the Narrator

Arthur Morey has won three AudioFile Magazine “Best Of” Awards: in 2011 for Biography and History, in for History and Historical Fiction, and in 2009 for Nonfiction and Culture. His work has also garnered twenty AudioFile Earphones Awards, and he has been nominated for an Audie Award. He graduated from Harvard and did graduate work at the University of Chicago. He has won awards for his fiction and drama, worked as an editor with several book publishers, and taught literature and writing at Northwestern University. As a narrator, he has received nineteen AudioFile Earphones Awards and been a finalist for the prestigious Audie Award.