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Extended Audio Sample The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates Audiobook, by Wes Moore Click for printable size audiobook cover
3.00029116319697 out of 53.00029116319697 out of 53.00029116319697 out of 53.00029116319697 out of 53.00029116319697 out of 5 3.00 (6,869 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Wes Moore Narrator: Wes Moore Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: April 2010 ISBN: 9780307736024
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Two kids with the same name lived in the same decaying city. One went on to be a Rhodes Scholar, decorated combat veteran, White House Fellow, and business leader. The other is serving a life sentence in prison. Here is the story of two boys and the journey of a generation.
 
In December 2000, the Baltimore Sun ran a small piece about Wes Moore, a local student who had just received a Rhodes Scholarship. The same paper also ran a series of articles about four young men who had allegedly killed a police officer in a spectacularly botched armed robbery. The police were still hunting for two of the suspects who had gone on the lam, a pair of brothers. One was named Wes Moore. 

Wes just couldn’t shake off the unsettling coincidence, or the inkling that the two shared much more than space in the same newspaper. After following the story of the robbery, the manhunt, and the trial to its conclusion, he wrote a letter to the other Wes, now a convicted murderer serving a life sentence without the possibility of parole. His letter tentatively asked the questions that had been haunting him: Who are you? How did this happen?

That letter led to a correspondence and relationship that have lasted for several years. Over dozens of letters and prison visits, Wes discovered that the other Wes had had a life not unlike his own: Both had grown up in similar neighborhoods and had had difficult childhoods, both were fatherless; they’d hung out on similar corners with similar crews, and both had run into trouble with the police. At each stage of their young lives they had come across similar moments of decision, yet their choices would lead them to astonishingly different destinies.

Told in alternating dramatic narratives that take readers from heart-wrenching losses to moments of surprising redemption, The Other Wes Moore tells the story of a generation of boys trying to find their way in a hostile world. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • A New York Times Bestseller
  • A San Francisco Chronicle Bestseller
  • A 2010 GoodReads Readers’ Choice Nominee for Memoir and Autobiography

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Words Alive | 1/30/2014

    " Great book but it was a little difficult for our students to follow. But it provides a great discussion! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Elizabeth | 1/28/2014

    " This is the book selection for next year's First Year/Freshman experience class. So far, I'm happy with the choice of book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David | 1/26/2014

    " Great memoir/bio. Nice complement to The Wire. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Peg | 1/19/2014

    " I got to hear the author speak at a health symposium recently, discussing the social determinants of health. In his book, he tells both his own story of growing up in both inner city Baltimore and the rough side of the Bronx; and of another young man with the same name, from the same neighborhood whose life turned out wholly different. It was a very good read, engaging and compelling. But he was an even better speaker. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cara Achteberg | 1/17/2014

    " Fascinating story. provided much food for thought about how we all have the power to influence lives for good and bad. It is a tragic story and should be required reading for every politician, leader, teacher, and social worker. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amanda | 1/15/2014

    " I liked this book. As the description states, it's about two men who grew up with the same name, at the same time, in similar neighborhoods, and yet the paths they chose led to extremely different adulthoods. This is particularly relevant to my work with young people, many of whom have struggled through difficulties that I cannot imagine having had to endure. It's one thing to hear from me that challenges can be overcome, but I think it's much more relevant coming from a writer like Wes Moore. I hope to get more of mys students to read his story. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brandon Calvert | 1/1/2014

    " I think it was a good book but I was dissapointed in the other Wes Moore's choice to start selling drugs again and getting arrested risking the safety of his family. He had kids to support and he went back to the street life knowing the consequences of getting caught. I wanted the other Wes Moore to turn his life around from a rough childhood into someone successfull as The Wes Moore who was able to meet the Mayor of Baltimore ! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Suzanne | 12/29/2013

    " Over and over the author Wes shows how others helped and influenced him in positive ways...and how the other Wes had only limited expectations from those around him. Interesting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dawn | 12/26/2013

    " I had really high expectations and came away more than a little disappointed. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Aaron | 12/24/2013

    " Was hoping for more insight, reflection, something. In the end, the only difference between the two Wes Moore's was access to education, and money. These aren't shocking revelations. Just the same sad American story told in a mediocre way. The hook of two Wes Moore's isn't enough to overcome that. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura | 12/10/2013

    " I liked this book. I read a paperback. It was interesting as it spoke directly to what it takes to make it out of the hood. (including luck) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dana | 12/3/2013

    " I found both stories interesting - the "other Wes Moore" is currently living his tragic ending while the author is "happily ever after." It didn't seem like that much of a mystery why the author succeeded in life, but I still found it fascinating. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dave Winn | 11/28/2013

    " The book was terrifically well written and gripping at times. Very educational and quite the conversation piece. I would recommend it to anyone contemplating inner-city kids lives and how some outcomes happen. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andrea | 11/14/2013

    " this book was amazing, a great view into what it is like to grow up in poverty and exposed to drug culture....and how with luck and resources one could get out...inspring but shows how difficult it is to make opportunities for these children to really make a difference and change the culture "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jane Smith | 9/28/2013

    " It was a very interesting and engaging look comparing to boys from similar backgrounds and the choices they made that helped to determine their fates. I liked it, but have yet to discuss it with anyone. It is certainly a book that lends to discussion. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Janice | 8/22/2013

    " Such an interesting story, but I wasn't impressed by the author's writing style, and never felt a connection to any of the subjects in the book. I think it was just too short and didn't give enough detail to really tell the story at a compelling level, at least for me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Salem | 10/19/2012

    " I reviewed The Other Wes Moore here. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ricky | 8/21/2012

    " I thought the book was well organized, included a great message, and kept me interested throughout the whole novel! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jamie | 4/5/2012

    " I keep thinking back on this compelling real-life story (two stories, really) and its lessons/societal implications, including what it says about family, parenting, education and my hometown of Baltimore. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Nikki Golden | 3/15/2012

    " This book had an interesting premise and was well-written, and I guess I was a bit disappointed that there wasn't enough about the other Wes Moore to really make a determination about where their lives changed paths. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joant | 12/8/2011

    " I thought this book was well written, and the parallel lifes of these two is fascinating. These are tough streets. I do not know if the premise is true, that one life could have become the other, though. The author Wes seems unusually talented to me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nancy | 11/29/2011

    " Good read - the question still remains: Nature vs. nurture? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mary | 9/27/2011

    " A very interesting contrast of two lives- similar but so different. I found it an easy read but very thought provoking about what makes the difference in a person's life. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cece | 9/10/2011

    " I really liked how that both Weses made simaliar mistakes and tried to fix their lives. In one Wes's case the situation was fixed by school and the other wasn't fixed. Both Weses collaborated to write this book and every chapter starts with a piece of their conversations, which I really liked. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Aimee Pavlik | 9/1/2011

    " Nature vs. nurture at its finest! 2 different stories about 2 very different men with the same name and same neighborhood (nearly). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kiera | 8/27/2011

    " This book was definitely worth the read. I enjoyed the storyline. And even while he was portraying the lives of two different people, I never got lost. If you haven't read this, definitely try it. You won't be disappointing. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jennie | 5/15/2011

    " kind of anti climactic but interesting commentary on the America's black inner city youth "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julie | 5/10/2011

    " Really liked this book. Thought provoking story about 2 guys that end up in very different places, that started in very similar places. I think all teenage boys should have to read this book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anna | 5/4/2011

    " Really interesting and very eye-opening. Ending a bit abruptly. I would've like to have learned more about the author's life today. But a powerful read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Coralee | 5/3/2011

    " I like this book but I don't feel that their lives were all that similar. True they both grew up without their father but one had a very strong support system while the other did not. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Andrew | 5/1/2011

    " A okay book as a sociological study. I thought I would like it moore (no pun intended). "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 KJ | 4/25/2011

    " This guy is totally running for President some day. I may vote for him. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Nikki | 4/24/2011

    " This book had an interesting premise and was well-written, and I guess I was a bit disappointed that there wasn't enough about the other Wes Moore to really make a determination about where their lives changed paths. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amy | 4/19/2011

    " Another one that makes you think. "

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About the Author

Wes Moore is a Rhodes Scholar, a combat veteran of Afghanistan, and has worked as a special assistant to Secretary Condoleezza Rice at the State Department as a White House fellow. He was a featured speaker at the 2008 Democratic National Convention, named one of Ebony magazine’s “Top Thirty Leaders Under Thirty,” and was recently dubbed one of the top young business leaders in America by Crain’s. He lives in Jersey City, New Jersey.