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Download The New New Thing: A Silicon Valley Story Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The New New Thing: A Silicon Valley Story (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Michael Lewis
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,747 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Michael Lewis Narrator: Bruce Reizen Publisher: Brilliance Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: September 2008 ISBN:
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In the weird glow of the dying millennium, Michael Lewis sets out on a safari through Silicon Valley to find the world's most important technology entrepreneur, the man who embodies the spirit of the coming age. He finds him in Jim Clark, who is about to create his third, separate, billion-dollar company: first Silicon Graphics, then Netscape - which launched the Information Age - and now Healtheon, a startup that may turn the $1 trillion healthcare industry on its head.

Despite the variety of his achievements, Clark thinks of himself mainly as the creator of Hyperion, which happens to be a sailboat - not just an ordinary yacht, but the world's largest single-mast vessel, a machine more complex than a 747. Clark claims he will be able to sail it via computer from his desk in San Francisco, and the new code may contain the seeds of his next billion-dollar coup.

On the wings of Lewis' celebrated storytelling, the listener takes the ride of a lifetime through this strange landscape of geeks and billionaires. We get the inside story of the battle between Netscape and Microsoft; we sit in the room as Clark tries to persuade the investment bankers that Healtheon IS the new Microsoft; we get queasy as Clark pits his boat against the rage of the North Atlantic in winter. And in every brilliant anecdote and character sketch, Lewis is drawing us a map of markets and free enterprise in the 21st century. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jason | 2/17/2014

    " A poor-quality audiobook full of vaguely-interesting material. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Grant Kvalheim | 2/16/2014

    " Tells some interesting anecdotes, not Lewis' best work "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ty | 2/3/2014

    " i bought this book a long time ago and never got around to reading it till this past week. i'm actually glad that i waited as the book now serves as a poignant reminder of good old days gone by..."The New New Thing" is a look at Silicon Valley in the 90's. Michael Lewis chose to profile Jim Clark as his paragon of the era, and a mighty wise choice he made. Clark is one of the biggest characters in a Valley of big characters. the story of Clark's rise from a hick from Plainview, Texas, through the Navy, then on to grad school and then Stanford where he "invented" 3D graphics, going on to found Silicon Graphics, then Netscape and then Healtheon is fascinating. i especially enjoyed the first half of the book dealing with the early days of SGI. i recognized the names of some of the people in the book as engineers i worked with while i was there, never knowing that they were actually co-founders of the company with Clark. all i knew was that the company had the best team of engineers i had ever seen. so sad that it all melted away. Lewis, whose writing i have always enjoyed, interleaves the story of Clark's companies with the story of Clark's quest to build the world's biggest sailing vessel, the Hyperion, and to make the boat completely computer controlled. the anecdotes of the problems that the designers had in trying to automate a 200 foot boat are priceless. the summary message is that Clark was focussed on doing the impossible and managed to drive people along with him. he was the perfect representative of the go-go 90's leading up the dotcom bubble. anything was possible, just don't ask too many questions about how we're gonna do it, cuz we don't know yet. a great book for all techies. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Hasan Qureshi | 2/2/2014

    " A telling tale of the sharks in Silicon Valley and a Man's resolve to beat them. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rene | 1/26/2014

    " Another great book from Michael Lewis. The story is basically Michael going through a period of time with Jim Clark. If you don't know who he is, Google him. He's brilliant! From his humble roots, to starting the biggest companies in the US, to his uncanny ability to come with ideas that were ahead of their time and his obsession with his remote controlled sailboat. Michael gives us an insight into what makes Jim tick and how he sees life. Never a dull moment! Affordable computers for more than keeping track of recipes, to automated homes and the internet; these seemed like the ravings of a lunatic, but they did come true. A must read!! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Stephen Holiday | 1/23/2014

    " Great wordsmith. Boring content. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jesse | 1/20/2014

    " Over the top Tom Wolfe-like profile of Netscape founder Jim Clark, one of the first Silicon Valley billionaires. Sometimes, Lewis's enthusiasm bordered on cliche, or -- at least -- seriously unsupportable arguments. But, hey, it was an entertaining portrait of the original Internet boom and the man responsible for some monumentally large waves of money breaking through the world markets. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tom | 1/19/2014

    " Lewis, Michael, (1999) The New New Thing, W.W. Norton & Company, New York, NY. A witty and insightful look into the entrepreneurial ecosystem in Silicon Valley, told as a story of the adventures of Jim Clark, a serial entrepreneur. One of the best books ever written on the Valley. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lex Alexander | 1/4/2014

    " It's an okay book overall. I felt like the chapters about his boat were simply filler information. The chapters on his business endeavors stand out the most and best encapsulates Silicon Valley in the 90s and early 2000s. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Drew Johnson | 12/25/2013

    " Both entertaining and reasonably insightful "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tina Hein | 12/20/2013

    " Hilarious and informative. Loved it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 SirPoochala | 12/17/2013

    " Finished it on a plane ride - couldn't put it down! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nancy Chorpenning | 11/28/2013

    " It was fun reading this as I was in the midst of the WebMD startup. There were a few surprises even for those of us who were there. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Erin | 9/30/2013

    " Interesting coverage of a very particular (and peculiar) era of recent American history. But lacked the insight (and personalities) that really make Moneyball or Liar's Poker tick. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Caleb Mason | 9/19/2013

    " What I most enjoyed about this great book is how the software engineers finally took money away from the Silicon Valley VCs, with the launch of Netscape. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sean | 10/21/2012

    " Gift from Kathy. Interesting read if the origins of the Internet boom intrigue you, but not something I'd go too far out of my way for. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Yi | 6/30/2012

    " It is an interesting book that explains how innovation happens in silicone valley. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Darryl Stangry | 6/15/2012

    " Interesting read. Does seem dated compared to some of Lewis' other works. Not sure it captures the essence of the era in the same way Liar's Poker did. Still very enjoyable and educational. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sonya Everard | 3/25/2012

    " Michael Lewis always delights. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mike | 2/25/2012

    " Written in 1999-2000 its like a time capsule of the tech bubble. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeff | 2/22/2012

    " Another great book by Lewis. Very interesting look at the Internet bubble and the man behind Netscape and other companies, Jim Clark. Read it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brent | 11/29/2011

    " I really like this as an overview of the Web1.0 bubble and also as an peak into Jim Clark's life and career. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nancy | 10/23/2011

    " It pains me to say it because I love me some Michael Lewis, but "The New New Thing" is not much more than the story of Jim Clark -- Netscape founder and all around Silicon Valley bigwig. And it only lends proof to the thinking that being rich and famous doesn't necessarily make one interesting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Roy | 8/31/2011

    " Pretty fascinating story about the founder of Netscape and at least according to this telling, the man who rocked Silicon Valley to it's current prominence. Flipping the roll of the engineer to to top. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeff | 5/1/2011

    " Another great book by Lewis. Very interesting look at the Internet bubble and the man behind Netscape and other companies, Jim Clark. Read it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lucas Wiman | 4/15/2011

    " Not Lewis' best, but an insightful take on the 1990's internet bubble as it was forming. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tim | 2/21/2011

    " Never really knew the story behind who Jim Clark is 'til now. Quite a character. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lisa | 1/8/2011

    " Loved this. Perhaps more than all the other Lewis books I've read (Liar's Poker, The Big Short, etc.) I laughed loudly and often at this breezy book about Silicon Valley, which is really saying something. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mauricio | 12/25/2010

    " Very good, the author writes in a such way that you can't put it down. read in a couple hours. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Gil | 10/5/2010

    " This was the story of Jim Clark's huge boat. Definitely Michael Lewis' worst book ever. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Dan | 7/10/2010

    " Michael Lewis's following book, Moneyball, was amazing. This book sucked. "

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About the Author
Author Michael Lewis

Michael Lewis is the bestselling author of Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, The Blind Side, The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine, and others. He has been a contributing editor at Vanity Fair since 2009. His writing has also appeared in the New Yorker, Sports Illustrated, and Gourmet; he worked as an editor for the British weekly the Spectator and as a senior editor and campaign correspondent for the New Republic. In addition to his writing, Lewis has filmed and narrated short pieces for ABC’s Nightline. He holds a BA in art history from Princeton and an MS in economics from the London School of Economics. Lewis and his wife live in Berkeley, California.