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Extended Audio Sample The Fuller Memorandum Audiobook, by Charles Stross Click for printable size audiobook cover
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (2,756 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Charles Stross Narrator: Gideon Emery Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Related: The Laundry Files Release Date: July 2010 ISBN: 9781449867072
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Computational demonologist Bob Howard is catching up on his filing in the Laundry archives when a top secret dossier known as the Fuller Memorandum vanishes—along with his boss, who is suspected of stealing the file. And while dealing with Russian agents, ancient demons, and a maniacal death cult, Bob must find the missing memorandum before the world ends up disappearing next.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “The satisfying ending should appeal to fans of gory horror while making them question the definition of humanity.”

    Publishers Weekly

  • “Gideon Emery is an engaging narrator who makes Howard a down-to-earth spy with moments of introspection and nonviolent tendencies. Emery’s offhand manner keeps the narration light even when bad events happen. He rides with the tongue-in-cheek humor without overdoing it.”

    AudioFile

  • A 2011 Locus Award Nominee
  • A 2010 GoodReads Readers’ Choice Nominee for Science Fiction

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Margaras | 2/17/2014

    " Great novel. A little darker than the previous ones. I've also been doing the short stories in between, so I've missed nothing. Good thing, too, as they're referenced in this novel. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ed | 2/13/2014

    " I thought this one was a resounding return to form for the series after the disappointment of The Jennifer Morgue. The focus here, thankfully, was back on the internal machinations of the Laundry and the novel was closer in tone to The Atrocity Archives with its effective mix of black humour, horror and convoluted spy thriller rather than the meandering slightly-too-clever-for-its-own-good Bond-esque adventure pastiche of the second volume. There is a sense that Stross made a conscious decision to return to the original strengths of the series, although the trade-off is a slight sense of deja vu with the plot elements, in particular the tendency for the narrative to hinge on overly complex occult pseudo-science Macguffins, the explanations of which slow things down. The mapping of occult magic on to computer science is a nifty idea and really the crux of the series, but at the same time, even as someone who is a bit of a geek and knows how to code, it really isn't that fascinating to read the ins and outs of Stross' fictional mathematical/magical system and I would have liked to have seen him tone this stuff down a bit to be honest. (view spoiler)[Also I am curious as to why the evil mastermind, once again, is Bob's psychotic female manager? Given the plots of the earlier books, the twist was obvious almost from the start. (hide spoiler)] That said, if you enjoy the idea of Lovecraftian spy thrillers with a bit of cyberpunk and Kafka thrown in, then you really can't go wrong with this. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Richard | 2/13/2014

    " Excellent sequel to the somewhat convoluted Jennifer Morgue. A very focused cloak and dagger experience, with plenty of scares and gory body horror worthy of both the Laundry series and of Lovecraft. Suffers from some pacing issues, imbalance of where exposition is given. Certain plot elements and characters are revealed too late. The characters have a tendency to speak in elaborate pop cultural allusions. However, Stross takes us through a gripping ride, and the final showdown alone is worth the price of admission. Here's looking forward to the next one! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 kvon | 2/9/2014

    " Book #3, and I enjoyed it more than #2. We're back in the territory of bureaucratic fantasy mashed with Lovecraftian horrors. Bob Howard is once again the 'damsel' in distress, with his wife riding to his rescue at the end. Parts I could figure out, parts surprised me. There's a series arc continuing with the coming of the end of the world which I'm wondering how Stross plans to wrap up. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Koressa | 2/5/2014

    " Engrossing third installment of Stross's The Laundry series. Looking forward to the next in the series, due out in summer 2012. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brainycat | 2/3/2014

    " Usually I like the first books in a series the best. In the Laundry series, Charles Stross has absolutely left the best for last. The ending wrapped up a little too neatly, but that's ok because one does not read this series for intensive navel-gazing, but rather tongue-in-cheek hardcore nerd humor mixed with the most ridiculously (im)plausible occult scenarios. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ah | 1/20/2014

    " Not enough Nyarlothotep. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 James Parks | 1/20/2014

    " Very good. I do notice that the stories are moving away from the occult AND office IT work and more towards just the occult aspect. I suppose that's only natural as Bob moves up the ranks of the Laundry. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shannon Appelcline | 12/10/2013

    " Continues to be a great modern look at the Cthulhu mythos. This one has a superb action-adventure climax and great continued characterization of a few major characters. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Simone | 12/8/2013

    " Stross at (almost) his best. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jack | 10/28/2013

    " Such a great series for those of us who fall in the colored portion of the Venn diagram of "computer nerds" and "fans of humorous Cthulhu mythos pastiche". This entry was in some ways the most satisfying, even though there was less humor and the repetitive elements are becoming obvious. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Simon Gosden | 8/30/2013

    " I didn't really get on with this one and that's maybe because this is the third book in a series. I found it all a tad confusing. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jakub | 8/15/2013

    " Absolutely predictable. Nerdy. Includes unspeakable horrors from outer space. Has its moments. Fast, light, casual read. Good fun while it lasted. Won't warp your mind. Read if you've enjoyed the style and world of two previous books. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michael Bourgon | 8/2/2013

    " Another great Laundry novel. A breezy easy read that's a lot of fun. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Murasaki_neko | 6/6/2013

    " This one is definitely my favorite of the three I've read from this series (this is the most recent). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mike Mason | 4/28/2013

    " Third time better. Darker and more in tune with source material. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michael Hall | 12/12/2012

    " A perfect amalgamation of Lovecraftian horror, British humour, inane office politics, and technological geekdom. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jonathan Strahan | 5/10/2012

    " The third Laundry novel is every bit as engaging as its two predecessors, taking Bob Howard into dark and parlous adventures where only his wits can save him. A little predictable in places, but overall highly entertaining "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rich Brown | 3/5/2012

    " This series is going to make a great set of movies, almost certainly starring Simon Pegg. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeff | 2/26/2012

    " The series begins to get more epic in scope, though it's hard to write anything too climactic and stay true to the Lovecraftian overtones. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tracey | 1/14/2012

    " Not his best work in my opinion, but an entertaining read none-the-less. However, that's mostly because I enjoy the idea of correlating writing code with demon summoning, regardless of actual plot substance. Not a book for non-coders, especially not for non-computer people. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Geoff Schaeffer | 12/20/2011

    " I basically read this book in two long sessions, interrupted only by work. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gina Brown | 12/7/2011

    " An absolute pleasure, a Lovecraftian Spy Thriller, perfect in everyway. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alison Gow | 10/19/2011

    " Third Laundry novel and the series gets better - I particularly didn't see the twist in this altho the mole was obvious. More eldritch horrors that man was not meant to wot etc etc being dealt with via an effectively deployed ISO900 form... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Burritomadness | 6/13/2011

    " I love this series. I should really read the first one in it though. Doh. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Pedro | 5/31/2011

    " Great book. I really like the Laundry Files series. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 5/23/2011

    " A comprehensive follow up to the first two Laundry novels. A really good read. Bob Howard is a very engaging protagonist. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 John | 5/17/2011

    " A bit too tongue in cheek for me; it tries way too hard to be cute. The tone is all over the place and never quite succeeds in being serious enough to build interest or tension. Still, the magic and science are very imaginative and the fact that it builds on Lovecraft is interesting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Daragh | 5/9/2011

    " A good read but still not up to the heights of The Atrocity Archives (the first in the sequence). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andy | 5/2/2011

    " more great mixing of Lovecraftean Horror and MI5 by way of the Office. But awesome. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joshua | 4/20/2011

    " I love the Laundry books. This one may not be quite as good as the previous two, but it's still tremendously enjoyable. Ian Fleming meets H.P. Lovecraft meets, well, Charles Stross. Do yourself a favor, though, and start with the first one (The Atrocity Archives). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Scott | 4/15/2011

    " Can't say enough about this one. Great Sci-fi, lots of humour and suspense. Wish they were all like this "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 brian | 3/28/2011

    " Not my favorite of The Laundry series, but still worth reading. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Renee | 3/13/2011

    " Loved the Bob character; unfortunately, I feel like I really need to go back and read the first two books in the series. To me, this third in the series really needs some backstory. I would recommend reading in sequence. I am going to go back and read the first two novels. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 T.W. | 2/18/2011

    " What do you get if you cross Neal Stephenson's Cryptonomicon with Kelly McCullough's Web Mage? The Fuller Memorandum. It's where science, math and magic meet -- a fun read! "

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About the Author
Author Charles Stross

Charles Stross is the author of the bestselling Merchant Princes series, the Laundry series, and several stand-alone novels, including Glasshouse, Accelerando, and Saturn’s Children. Born in Leeds, England, in 1964, Stross studied in London and Bradford, earning degrees in pharmacy and computer science. Over the next decade and a half he worked as a pharmacist, a technical writer, a software engineer, and eventually as a prolific journalist covering the IT industry. His short fiction began attracting wide attention in the late 1990s; his first novel, Singularity Sky, appeared in 2003. He has subsequently won the Hugo Award twice. He lives with his wife in Edinburgh, Scotland, in a flat that is slightly older than the state of Texas.

About the Narrator

Gideon Emery was raised in England and South Africa, where he won the National Vita Award for Comedy and a Gold Craft Award for Voice-over. Now based in Los Angeles, he has appeared on such television series as 24, Burn Notice, Eleventh Hour, CSI:NY, and Moonlight. His film credits include Primeval, Train, and Takers. He is also an in-demand voice for video games.