The Forever War Audiobook, by Dexter Filkins Play Audiobook Sample

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The Forever War Audiobook, by Dexter Filkins Play Audiobook Sample
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Author: Dexter Filkins Narrator: Robertson Dean Publisher: Random House Audio Audio Length: Release Date: September 2008 Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download ISBN: 9781415957820

Publisher Description

From the front lines of the battle against Islamic fundamentalism, a searing, unforgettable audiobook that captures the human essence of the greatest conflict of our time. Through the eyes of Dexter Filkins, the prize-winning New York Times correspondent, we witness the remarkable chain of events that began with the rise of the Taliban in the 1990s, continued with the attacks of 9/11, and moved on to the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Filkins’s narrative moves across a vast and various landscape of amazing characters and astonishing scenes: a public amputation performed by the Taliban, children frolicking in minefields, skies streaked white by the contrails of B-52’s, a night’s sleep in the rubble of Ground Zero. We venture into a torture chamber run by Saddam Hussein.  We go into the homes of suicide bombers, meet Iraqi insurgents, and an American captain who loses a quarter of his men in eight days. The Forever War allows us a visceral understanding of today’s battlefields and of the experiences of the people on the ground, warriors and innocents alike.  It is a brilliant, fearless work, not just about America’s wars after 9/11, but ultimately about the nature of war itself.

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Awards

  • A New York Times bestseller
  • Selected for the October 2008 Indie Next List
  • A 2008 Washington Post Best Book for Nonfiction
  • A 2008 Los Angeles Times Best Book for Nonfiction
  • A 2008 USA Today Best Book for Nonfiction
  • A 2008 Boston Globe Book of the Year for Nonfiction
  • A 2008 Guardian Best Book of the Year for Nonfiction
  • A 2008 ALA Notable Book for Nonfiction
  • Winner of the 2008 National Book Critics Circle Award for General Nonfiction
  • Winner of the 2009 Colby Award
  • A 2008 New York Times Book Review Top 10 Book of the Year
  • A 2009 Time Magazine Top 10 Book for Nonfiction
  • New York Times Book Review 100 Notable Books for Nonfiction, 2008
  • Winner of the 2008 Cornelius Ryan Award
  • A 2008 Los Angeles Times Book Prize Nominee for Current Interest

Customer Reviews

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  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " Skips around some. But all in all...really good. You kind of think that maybe some folks in politics should read this book, given that Filkins seems to know more about Iraq and Afghanistan than all of our intelligence agencies. "

    - Rahul, 1/8/2014
  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

    " This book is not an introduction to the Iraq war. It doesn't, as it shouldn't, try to be one, though an introduction is maybe what I was expecting. I probably know as much about the war, really, as the average American, which is to say: frighteningly little. Filkins focuses less on explaining why things are the way they are in Iraq and instead humanizes the war -- gives names to the soldiers, the civilians, the insiders, the insurgents, etc. And at this he does an excellent job. The guy has been everywhere, and it's taken for granted within the context of the book that if there is someone who needs to be spoken to/with, he'll track that person down, despite bullets whizzing everywhere like laser beams in a Mission Impossible movie, and interview him/her. I honestly wouldn't have been surprised if Filkins had included an account of his conversation(s) with Saddam. He discusses how the incredible violence became numbing, how he began to feel invulnerable, as soldiers and civilians dropped around him while he suffered nary a scratch. And you too, as reader, often forget the danger that the guy is putting himself through to get you this information. It's really powerful, and as a result it's really depressing. And yet. I couldn't get passed the fact that the writing was seriously sub par. There were awkward and inappropriately colloquial (i.e. lazy) phrasings, there was bad rhythm, there were cliches. It was, to me, as I sat in my comfy, heated, secure, checkpoint- and razorwire-free, sans-roof-sniper American apartment, OK, fine, really distracting. And but is it wrong of me to criticize someone for writing less-than-great prose just because he's gone through near-literal hell to bring it to me? Well, I'd say no it isn't. No more than it's wrong to criticize Bush for being laughably inarticulate, or to praise Nabokov for constructing beautiful sentences about a man lusting after a twelve-year-old. "

    - Paul, 12/20/2013
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " I really enjoyed this book. The writing is done really well and it gives you a feeling for what goes on in war. This isn't a very happy book, but I would absolutely recommend it to anyone with an interest in the war. One of the things I liked about it was that it doesn't seem to be political at all. If you are for the war or against it, you will enjoy this book. "

    - Kevin, 11/29/2013
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " Definately a different perspective on the war against terrorism. "

    - James, 11/26/2013
  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

    " I was a little disappointed due to all the high praise on this. It was good, but I found it uneven. At times, really drawn in, at others, not really. Overall it was insightful and seemed unbiased. I guess I'm glad I read it. "

    - Andrew, 11/22/2013
  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " A moving book that puts the usual platitudes about war, and the price of war, in a human context. There are many memorable moments but what resonated for me was the sheer stubborness/blindness to risk of the author in going for a daily run in 130 degree heat in a war zone - and the (related?) ability of human being to become accustomed to the daily outrages of multiple bombings/explosions/deaths in their "ordinary" routine. Courage? Stubbornness? Willful blindness? Acceptance? Apathy? I think all of the above, in various measures. "

    - Min, 10/23/2013
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " Read this together with Emergency Sex, and you get a sense for the absolutely bizarre psychology of working in the worse possible war zones. I like the way the book is purposefully written in a non-linear fashion to show the length or perhaps the breadth of the war. "

    - Aaron, 9/23/2013
  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " Great book about the war in Afghanistan and Iraq from the perspective of an American Journalist. I thought this book was unbiased and focused more on the things Filkins saw, portraying Americans and Arabs as in a good and bad way both, he shows both their flaws as human beings in a war. Great read I highly recommend. "

    - Kendra, 9/5/2013
  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " Powerful, captivating book. Highly recommended for those interested in what soldiers experience in combat in Iraq. "

    - Gary, 8/26/2013
  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " Excellent first-hand reporting from someone who was there and interacted with Iraqi citizens and American soldiers. "

    - Steve, 8/15/2013
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " a short book loved it when they fought the computer "

    - Liyah, 3/15/2013
  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " Do yourself a favor and read this book. Seriously. Just. Do. It. "

    - Liz, 9/29/2012
  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " A very disturbing book about the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars but I am glad I read it. "

    - Linda, 9/5/2012
  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " Not an easy read but insanely good. I can't stop thinking about it and talking to others about it. Filkins presents vignettes of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. "

    - Amy, 6/21/2012
  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " An amazing book. Captures the complexities of the Iraq War really well in these stories. It's not a politically book. It tells the stories of Iraqis on all sides, and American Soldiers, and Filkins himself. It seems destined to be a classic book on Iraq (and Afghanistan). Can't recommend it enough. "

    - Mark, 6/3/2012
  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " A fantastic condemnation of the American war of terror that says so much without ever saying so. "

    - Bill, 11/23/2011
  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " This heartbreaking and graphic daily war diary by a news reporter is a necessary complement to other books on the overarching politics of the war. The tragedy and terror of war comes through clearly. For our fighting men and women, and the people of Iraq, we get a better look at their lives. "

    - Trish, 10/25/2011
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " A very candid and interesting view of the war in Iraq. Love, war and people are very complex and we are all history in the making. "

    - Angeldauria, 9/26/2011
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " An easy, quick read. Should be required reading for every American. "

    - Nealhonda, 5/29/2011
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " a NYTimes and LATimes reports writes about the Iraq war from the front lines "

    - Dan, 4/27/2011
  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " . heartbreaking, sad and beautifully written. "

    - Richard, 4/4/2011
  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " Absolutley amazing and gripping story of what it is really like for our troops in Afganistan and Iraq. "

    - Jack, 3/28/2011
  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " A fantastic condemnation of the American war of terror that says so much without ever saying so. "

    - Bill, 3/1/2011

About the Author

Dexter Filkins, a foreign correspondent for the New York Times, has covered the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq since 2001. Before that, he worked for the Los Angeles Times, where he was chief of the paper’s New Delhi bureau, and for the Miami Herald. In 2009, he was part of a team of Times reporters who won a Pulitzer Prize for covering Afghanistan and Pakistan. He lives in New York City.

About the Narrator

Robertson Dean has played leading roles on and off Broadway and at dozens of regional theaters throughout the country. He has a BA from Tufts University and an MFA from Yale. His audiobook narration has garnered ten AudioFile Earphones Awards. He now lives in Los Angeles, where he works in film and television in addition to narrating.