Nationalism Audiobook, by Rabindranath Tagore Play Audiobook Sample

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Nationalism Audiobook, by Rabindranath Tagore Play Audiobook Sample
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Author: Rabindranath Tagore Narrator: Subhankar Ganguly Publisher: Random House Audio Audio Length: Release Date: September 2020 Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download ISBN: 9780143497271

Publisher Description

Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941) was the first Asian to win a Nobel Prize. Nationalism is based on lectures delivered by him during the First World War. While the nations of Europe were doing battle, Tagore urged his audiences in Japan and the United States to eschew political aggressiveness and cultural arrogance. His mission, one might say, was to synthesize East and West, tradition and modernity. The lectures were not always well received at the time, but were chillingly prophetic. As Ramachandra Guha shows in his brilliant and erudite Introduction, it was by reading and speaking to Tagore that those founders of modern India, Gandhi and Nehru, developed a theory of nationalism that was inclusive rather than exclusive. Tagore's Nationalism should be mandatory reading in today's climate of xenophobia, sectarianism, violence and intolerance.

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About the Author

Rabindranath Tagore (1861–1941) was a Bengali polymath who reshaped the art of his culture. His novels, stories, songs, dance-dramas, and essays spoke to topics political and personal. His verse, short stories, and novels were acclaimed—or panned—for their lyricism, colloquialism, naturalism, and unnatural contemplation. His compositions were chosen by two nations as national anthems: India’s “Jana Gana Mana” and Bangladesh’s “Amar Shonar Bangla.” Tagore was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1913 and knighted by the British Crown in 1915, though he later renounced this honor after the 1919 Amritsar massacre.