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Download The End of Overeating: Taking Control of the Insatiable American Appetite Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The End of Overeating: Taking Control of the Insatiable American Appetite Audiobook, by David A. Kessler Click for printable size audiobook cover
3.53 out of 53.53 out of 53.53 out of 53.53 out of 53.53 out of 5 3.53 (30 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: David A. Kessler Narrator: Blair Hardman Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: April 2009 ISBN: 9780743596800
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Most of us know what it feels like to fall under the spell of food -- when one slice of pizza turns into half a pie, or a handful of chips leads to an empty bag. But it's harder to understand why we can't seem to stop eating -- even when we know better. When we want so badly to say "no," why do we continue to reach for food?

Dr. David Kessler, the dynamic former FDA commissioner who reinvented the food label and tackled the tobacco industry, cracks the code of overeating by explaining how our bodies and minds are changed when we consume foods that contain sugar, fat, and salt. Food manufacturers create products by manipulating these ingredients to stimulate our appetites, setting in motion a cycle of desire and consumption that ends with a nation of overeaters. The End of Overeating explains for the first time why it is exceptionally difficult to resist certain foods and why it's so easy to overindulge.

Dr. Kessler presents groundbreaking research, along with what is sure to be a controversial view inside the industry that continues to feed a our nation -- from popular brand manufacturers to advertisers, chain restaurants, and fast food franchises. Dr. Kessler's cutting-edge investigation offers new insights and useful tools to help us find a solution. There has never been a more thorough, compelling, or in-depth analysis of why we eat the way we do. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “A fascinating account of the science of human appetite, as well as its exploitation by the food industry. The End of Overeating is an invaluable contribution to the national conversation about the catastrophe that is the modern American diet.” 

    Michael Pollan, author of In Defense of Food

  • “Kessler, who led the battle against the tobacco industry, now joins the fight against obesity. His message is important: The problem is not only the behavior of profit-driven food companies, but also the daily choices that each one of us makes.” 

    Eric Schlosser, author of Fast Food Nation

  • “Disturbing, thought-provoking, and important.” 

    Anthony Bourdain, author of Kitchen Confidential and host of Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations

  • “Kessler’s fascinating book is essential for anyone interested in learning more about how corporate greed and human psychology have created a national health crisis.” 

    Alice Waters, chef and founder of Chez Panisse

  • A New York Times Bestseller

Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Robin | 2/17/2014

    " A fascinating read! Has forever changed my view of chain restaurants and processed foods (they ARE the enemy). A must read for anyone who has struggled with food addiction. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lynn | 2/11/2014

    " I think this is probably the sort of book that's at best mildly interesting if you aren't directly plagued by conditioned hypereating (as many of the other reviews would suggest), and that's a gold mine if you see yourself in its pages. The first chunk is heavy into the neurology of conditioning and addiction as it relates to the products food manufacturers have engineered to make as appealing -- and, thus, sell as much -- as possible. As I'm the kind of person who likes to understand the mechanism of what's going on in her body, I thought it was terrific. It's short on specific solutions, although I suppose that's to be expected in what comes down to a highly individual problem. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Heather C. | 2/10/2014

    " The title of this book is misleading, I think. I found it much more about the food industry and even some physiological aspects of modern food consumption, rather than a how-to book. There are some great explanations about modern food in here that will really stick with you, and definitely change the way you look at your food, especially the food you eat in restaurants. It made me want to make every single thing I eat from scratch. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 E | 1/14/2014

    " Clever, original, and potentially helpful, but a bit annoyingly repetitive. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Perkidebs | 1/9/2014

    " This was a fantastic and informative read. I don't look at processed food the same way now. This book changed the way I think about food. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Catherine | 1/6/2014

    " Interesting read, gives me something to think about why we all love eating out and pre-packaged food so much. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Whitney | 12/30/2013

    " A great book that gives insight into why people overheat-awareness is half the battle "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Alison | 12/26/2013

    " Already knew all this crap. It just made me feel guilty and think that I'm killing my family. If I was a millionaire I'd shop at Whole Foods people. Give me a freakin' break! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Anita Smith | 12/7/2013

    " I had so much promise for this book, but it was just too scientific and biology-based for me. I was hoping for something a little more sociological or behavioral-based. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Theresa Brown | 12/6/2013

    " This is an amazing book. Really really smart about how Americans eat and how we get tricked in a way into eating food that really is not healthy because the fats and sugars are really well hidden. All we know is that the food tastes great. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hdmsisk | 4/29/2013

    " Another excellent book on understanding why one over eats. This book focused on the biology that leads to over eating. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kristina | 2/4/2012

    " I read most of it but got bored with all the studies. It was kind of interesting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 jeffrey | 1/16/2012

    " Frequently redundant and in need of editing, the book nonetheless has some good information on food technology and marketing theory. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Richard | 1/7/2012

    " It went like this: P R O B L E M , P R O B L E M solution. If a bit more time could have been spent on the solution (which his are great) and less on the problem, then it would have been truely a perfect book. about its subject -and that is, exactly what its title suggests: The end of overeating. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Vex | 10/24/2011

    " Describing how humans are wired to seek always more of fat, salt & sugar, and how food producers are making "hyperpalatable" foods to make advantage of this. The "practical" section that was supposed to walk you through how to stop overeating was too abstract and lacking. The first part was great. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Bryce | 10/15/2011

    " Americans are fat because we eat too much. We eat too much because our foods are filled with salt, fat and sugar. Which, obviously, makes it delicious. Thanks, David Kessler, for this unforeseen information. I can't wait for your next few books about the pope being Catholic and rain being wet. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Belle | 10/3/2011

    " A very interesting read on managing food addiction. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Meg Maguire | 7/5/2011

    " Interesting and well-written, but no major revelations for this nutrition media connoisseur. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 reed | 6/24/2011

    " His facts are right on, but he takes a long time to lay them out. He's not a great writer and his practical suggestions are too vague to be very useful. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kristen | 6/22/2011

    " Great book about how food producers manipulate the food they produce. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rich | 6/22/2011

    " Fascinating, very detailed empirical examintation on why we in the west are getting more obese. Scary. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kristen | 6/19/2011

    " Very interesting for the most part!! (Other than when he explains multiple experiments conducted on rats) Good insights into the food industries' marketing ploys and how high salt, sugar and fatty foods actually alter the chemicals in your brain! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lauren | 6/12/2011

    " This book is amazing... it's the first I've read about the "why" involved in the obesity epidemic, and about how the food industry has created foods designed to lessen our own control over eating. I can't put it down! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sigrid | 6/10/2011

    " A must read on the obesity epidemic--by the end of the book, when you look at a menu in a restaurant, you say, "Man, fat on salt on sugar on fat, ugh." "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mandy | 6/9/2011

    " I absolutely loved this book! It gave me so many ideas on how to handle over eating, and the reasons behind why we do it! Definitely a must read if you struggle with over eating. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kari | 6/7/2011

    " first part of the book is describing all the yummy food you should not eat, then the author tells you why you want them.. sugar, fat and salt.... and then to change that.. you must eat small portions and refuse to eat foods stuffed with sugar, salt and fat.. not really new info. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Meg | 5/8/2011

    " Interesting and well-written, but no major revelations for this nutrition media connoisseur. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julie | 5/7/2011

    " Fat, salt and sugar - studied by scientists and then combined in increasingly addictive ways. Why DO those appetizers "melt in your mouth"? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Stacie | 4/30/2011

    " I truly believe this book holds the answers to America’s obesity epidemic. If we change our ways, the health and food industries will eventually change as well. The book is, at times, a bit redundant, but provides concrete advice on how to gain control. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Katie | 4/25/2011

    " Wow, this book is making me change the way I think about food. Some of the discussion gets a little technical, but I think he does a great job of making the neurophysiology understandable, without losing the more technical details. Wish some of my med school profs had been as good. "

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About the Author

David A. Kessler, MD, served as commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration under presidents George H. W. Bush and Bill Clinton. He is the author of A Question of Intent and The End of Overeating, a New York Times bestseller. He is a pediatrician and has been the dean of the medical schools at Yale and the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Kessler is a graduate of Amherst College, the University of Chicago Law School, and Harvard Medical School.