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Extended Audio Sample The Design of Everyday Things Audiobook, by Donald A. Norman Click for printable size audiobook cover
4.1 out of 54.1 out of 54.1 out of 54.1 out of 54.1 out of 5 4.10 (29 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Donald A. Norman Narrator: Peter Berkrot Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2011 ISBN: 9781452674124
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First, businesses discovered quality as a key competitive edge; next came science. Now, Donald A. Norman, former Director of the Institute for Cognitive Science at the University of California, reveals how smart design is the new frontier. The Design of Everyday Things is a powerful primer on how-and why-some products satisfy customers while others only frustrate them. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “Makes a strong case for the needlessness of badly conceived and badly designed everyday objects…This book may herald the beginning of a change in user habits and expectations, a change that manufacturers would be obliged to respond to. Button pushers of the world, unite.”

    Los Angeles Times

  • Provocative. Time

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Scott Suthren | 1/23/2014

    " Kickstarted my career in experience design. Great book for simple but obvious insights. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Coral Rose | 1/14/2014

    " Someone from work borrowed this. I will have to wait a bit to finish it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Stephanie | 1/5/2014

    " I did enjoy it, but it got a little repetitive. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sonia | 12/19/2013

    " Every designer should read this book. You will approach the simple task of opening a door in a whole new way. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Prescott | 12/18/2013

    " Needs to be updated for the 21st century, but the principles are sound. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rica | 12/17/2013

    " Fascinating and reassuring. For example, explains why so many smart, literate people try to push open a door that's clearly labelled "Pull"--or vice versa. Doors and other objects "invite" us by their design to take certain actions. A door with a vertical handle invites us to pull on it, despite any signs suggesting otherwise. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Maggie | 12/11/2013

    " Interesting and provocative, though a tad bit dated, as it was written in 1988. Still, worth reading for its insights into usability and design. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jason | 12/4/2013

    " A good overview of the issues involved with being a user and a designer. Unintentional comedy from some of the ways that technology has changed since 1988. Also, the author comes across as a bit curmudgeonly. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris March | 12/2/2013

    " A helpful read for anyone who creates things for people to use. It may not be the most entertaining book, but there are a number of valuable guidelines. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rebecca | 10/16/2013

    " It really makes you think about what should seem like the basics of design (which resembles common sense- should be obvious, but isn't). Even if you aren't a designer, it's worth reading. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Valerie N. | 9/3/2013

    " I was delighted to learn that it is not human err that will bring down the house, but the badly designed house that will fall on the humans. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cathy Shive | 8/27/2013

    " i don't feel bad when i run into doors anymore. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Doreva | 8/3/2013

    " Many dated references, but the book is still very useful for anyone interested in physical or systems design. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Greg Mathews | 6/27/2013

    " Awesome book that introduces the fundamental aspects of design. Even though the book was written over 20 years ago the concepts are easily applied to web design and more modern technological design. Awesome book! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Caitlin | 5/29/2013

    " A fantastic book which changed the way I see the world. Marvellous to have a reason why we pull when the sign on the door says push! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bret | 4/9/2013

    " Interesting look at design in general. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David | 2/4/2013

    " The examples are really dated, but still an interesting and applicable perspective. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mike Hales | 11/7/2012

    " Foundational reading, much required though writing style is a little verbose. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tim Erlin | 6/28/2012

    " Everyone can benefit from this book, if only in absorbing the message that your inability to use everyday objects isn't your fault. It's another book that sticks with you over years. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Marijka | 1/19/2012

    " This was not a joy, fun or very important to read. It was a long, dry, slog through outdated concepts. I can see how this book could be important as part of the history of design and that it served a purpose many years ago. But today I think there are better books on usability and design. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andromeda Yelton | 11/16/2011

    " Astonishingly good. Moves seamlessly among theory, example, and best practices. Might turn out to be a five-star book in time - that is, one of those books that changes how I see the world. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Luke | 11/7/2011

    " A great book explaining how everyday objects can disappear or make you feel dumb through design. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Faisal | 10/24/2011

    " Read a few chapters, really love it. it focuses on the idea that we should blame the designers, not ourselves, for not making everything easy to use. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kris | 10/13/2011

    " Read this for book club a few months ago...I do love thinking about affordances and design and all of that, but I think these types of things generally work better in article format (where you can focus in on case studies, etc.) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rich | 9/19/2011

    " A great book that gave me a tremendous amount to think about. (Though the references to Clock Radios, CD players and Laser Disk players made me chuckle). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Timothy | 9/12/2011

    " There are some tiresome stretches, and it's not clear why he made no effort to bring subsequent editions of the book up to date. It is still a brilliant and inspiring introduction to the subject of design. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lissa | 8/24/2011

    " excellent read!! especially if your interested in psychology and design "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lavanya | 8/18/2011

    " This book changed my world view . It taught me how to give a damn about User Interface. Must read if you are even considering a career in any product development. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rob | 8/3/2011

    " Given that my passion is User Experience and Interaction this book is an incredible read. Its amazing the things we as consumers take for granted with respect to how things are made and used. "

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About the Author
Author Donald A. Norman

Donald A. Norman is cofounder of the Nielsen Norman Group, an executive consulting firm that helps companies produce human-centered products and services. He is Breed Professor of Design Emeritus at Northwestern University and Professor Emeritus at the University of California, San Diego, where he was founding chair of the Department of Cognitive Science and chair of the Department of Psychology. He has served as Vice President of Apple computer’s advanced technology group, and his many books include Emotional Design, The Design of Future Things, and Living with Complexity.

About the Narrator

Peter Berkrot, a forty-year veteran of stage and screen, was the director of narration for the Emmy-nominated The Truth about Cancer. He has voiced over three hundred audiobook titles, winning six Earphones Awards, a 2012 Audie Award nomination, and a 2016 Audie Award. He has appeared in Showtime’s Brotherhood and Loosies and played Angie D’Annunzio in Caddyshack.