Extended Audio Sample

Download Silas Marner (Adaptation): Oxford University Press Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Silas Marner (Adaptation): Oxford University Press (Unabridged) Audiobook, by George Eliot
3.81 out of 53.81 out of 53.81 out of 53.81 out of 53.81 out of 5 3.81 (27 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: George Eliot Narrator: Chris Rowe Publisher: Oxford University Press Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 2010 ISBN:
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In a hole under the floorboards Silas Marner the linen-weaver keeps his gold. Every day he works hard at his weaving, and every night he takes the gold out and holds the bright coins lovingly, feeling them and counting them again and again. The villagers are afraid of him and he has no family, no friends. Only the gold is his friend, his delight, his reason for living. But what if a thief should come in the night and take his gold away? What will Silas do then? What could possibly comfort him for the loss of his only friend? An Oxford Bookworms Library reader for learners of English, adapted from the George Eliot original by Clare West.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ell | 2/12/2014

    " I love this book when I first read it in high school. I just had to read it again. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Emese | 2/12/2014

    " A classic! Heart warming tale of an old man and a baby girl who grows up into a lovely young woman and their loylaty for each other "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Tracy | 1/31/2014

    " I didn't get through this book, and it's pretty small! I had a really hard time with the language and since it is very Victorian, I had to keep re-reading paragraphs to figure out what the characters were saying. I got the "feel" for the book, but as I was reading, I found that I just really didn't give a damn about the main character. It was too much work to read and decipher the "language". I guess this one is just not for me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rick Ludwig | 1/28/2014

    " Like most of us, I read this back in high school, but am trying to add to my list of books read as I recall books I have read. I did think it was one of the more interesting of the books I had to reread for high school English at the time. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Bridget | 1/22/2014

    " I hate this book only slightly less than the Grapes of Wrath "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 January Bodlovic | 1/18/2014

    " I enjoyed this book. Reminded me of Valjean and Cosette... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Maren | 1/12/2014

    " This is such a sweet story of love and what goes around comes around. Everyone got what they deserved, good or bad or somewhere in between, and there are several endearing characters that make me laugh. I wish the author wouldn't write the dialog with an accent though, it makes it harder to read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Siew Anastasiou | 1/9/2014

    " Its an incredible book. I love the old style english. Silas who was the despised character was redeemed by his kindness to an orphan "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elise Noorda | 12/30/2013

    " wonderful book - a study in what really matters in our lives. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ada | 12/18/2013

    " Very good depiction of good and evil. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alison | 12/10/2013

    " I love George Eliot. This was a great story with a great message but the ending seemed a little too abrupt for me. 3.5 stars. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Zach | 12/10/2013

    " I can't get around Eliot's undying allegiance to realism. I try, I try, yet I fail. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gary | 11/20/2013

    " What more could possibly be said about this book? It stands the test of time and continues to entertain and inspire. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Millie | 7/24/2013

    " Liked it. Had some great points about money--perspectives on money, when it is not the focus of one's life can be a decent thing contrasted with how it can canker and destroy lives and relationships if it the focus. The book had some insights on human relationships that were enlightening. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Allyson | 2/7/2012

    " I enjoyed reading about each different person in the book. I liked to read how Silas and Godfrey for better and worse and the way it effected their lives. I really enjoyed all of the personalities in the book and seeing what happens to each of them. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michele bookloverforever | 8/18/2011

    " read it in high school, thought it was BORING. read it again at 62 and GOT IT. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Pallavi Mehta | 7/3/2011

    " A heavenly written mystery with beautiful writing. The most amazing descriptions of the English country are probably written by Gearge Elliot. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Thequaminator | 5/16/2011

    " One of the best stories. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tim | 5/14/2011

    " Just a delightful story, a true classic. The prose style can keep you on your toes, commas, semi-colons and colons abound, so skimming is not going to happen; but who would want to as Ms. Eliot expertly weaves some social commentary into her simple moral tale. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 V.E. | 5/12/2011

    " It was a little hard to get through but a pretty sweet story anyway. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anastasia | 4/30/2011

    " Excellent read. I could read this book one hundred times over. I would recommend it to anyone. Definitely top ten. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shelby | 4/30/2011

    " One of my favorites. I need to read it again but I remember being wholly glad that I did. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michelle | 4/29/2011

    " I was pleasantly surprised by this book. Granted there were a few places that got a bit verbose for me, but I was intrigued by the characters and how things did and did not turn out for them. I loved the underlying theme of how love can change a character. Worth a read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jerry | 4/26/2011

    " I skipped reading this book in high school. What a treasure I missed by not reading it then. It is a marvelous book and I heartily recommend it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Corey | 4/25/2011

    " Old Victorian novel that is very familiar, but the strength of it is that themes are so clearly presented, the book wins you over. Typically don't like heavy handed symbolism but it doesn't matter because Silas is so fully realized as a character. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Susan | 4/13/2011

    " I found the first two thirds tedious. But when Eppy came to live with him, not only was Silas redeemed, but the book was redeemed. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Tony | 4/13/2011

    " After wading my way through 100 pages or so of frequently opaque syntax, I find that there was very little point or drama to this story. "

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About the Author
Author George Eliot

George Eliot, the pen name of Mary Ann, or Marian, Evans (1819–1880), was an English Victorian novelist of the first rank. An assistant editor for the Westminster Review from 1851 to 1854, she wrote her first fiction in 1857 and her first full-length novel, Adam Bede, in 1859. In her writing, she was chiefly preoccupied with moral problems, especially the moral development and psychological analysis of her characters. She is known for her sensitive and honest depiction of life and people in works that are acclaimed as classics.