Extended Audio Sample

Download Silas Marner Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Silas Marner Audiobook, by George Eliot Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (115,497 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: George Eliot Narrator: Geraldine James Publisher: Copyright Group Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2014 ISBN: 9781780001562
Regular Price: $15.95 Add to Cart
— or —
BEST PRICE!
FlexPass™ Price: $12.95$5.95$5.95 for new members!
Add to Cart learn more )

Embittered by a false accusation, disappointed in friendship and love, the weaver Silas Marner retreats into a long twilight life alone with his loom … and his gold.

Silas hoards a treasure that destroys his spirit until fate steals it from him and replaces it with a golden-haired child. Where she came from, who her parents were, and who really stole the gold are the secrets that fill this moving tale of guilt and innocence.

A moral allegory of the redemptive power of love, it is also a finely drawn portrait of early nineteenth-century England in the days when spinning wheels hummed busily in the farmhouses, and of a simple way of life that was soon to disappear.                                          

Download and start listening now!

BK_LDIG_000024

Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cynthia Gryder | 2/18/2014

    " Excellent book! Has love, mystery and redemption. Great ending! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Louise H | 2/16/2014

    " A nice story, slow in parts though. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Eruwenfuin | 2/11/2014

    " Bit preachy at times? The story's fine though :) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lek | 2/11/2014

    " Haven't read it for years but would like to read it again, in Spanish this time. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Meadow | 2/10/2014

    " it was really sweet. Little Eppie just captures your heart, and the plots within the plots are quite good. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Virginia | 2/8/2014

    " This book taught me that true wealth is not found in what we have, but in who we love. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Katherine | 2/7/2014

    " I loved this book! The story was touching on a lot of levels. The plot is simple and the language is not as complicated or elaborate as some, but served to tell a wonderful story. A new favorite. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kathy | 2/7/2014

    " This was my first time reading Silas Marner. When I ran across the title to this book my interest was sparked because my husbands grandfather was Silas Marner Carter and his his great-great-grandfather was also a Silas Marner Gabbard. This is a wonderful story of someone who thought more of gold until it was taken away and replaced by a child. It also shows that truthfulness is always best. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Simon C | 2/7/2014

    " Quite strangely structured by modern standards but a rather interesting and moving story. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mitch Duckworth | 2/5/2014

    " Read so long ago, I cannot remember why this book impressed me; it was required reading and I know that I resisted it for the the first half, but was pulled in, and gained enthusiasm, fairly galloping toward the end. No, it was not because it was almost over. Another read is in order. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Darren | 2/4/2014

    " A small book in size but not always an easy read. I had to keep the ol' dictionary handy. A seminary professor highly recommended this book during a study on Ecclesiastes which was the major draw for me to read. At some points I absolutely loved the story and at other points I was somewhat bored and wondered if the difficult read was worth the challenge. Well to answer that, it was totally worth it. Loved the message that even if you hit rock bottom and it seems that all things are against you, there is a purpose for these afflictions and there is always hope. I want to give it a 3.5 but I can't, so I'm rounding it up. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jerome Peterson | 2/4/2014

    " SILAS MARNER is a moving tale of guilt and innocence; a moral allegory of the redemptive power of love. It is also a finely drawn picture of early nineteenth-century England "in the days when spinning wheels hummed busily in the farmhouses." and a simple way of life which was soon to disappear. This is one of those delightful novels where you feel you are there living with the characters. Eliot does a masterful job of putting you with the weaver Silas. I thoroughly enjoy books like this because I can escape from the "in-your-face" realities of the modern world and hide in Silas Marners' room with his material and loom watching every so closely the fondling young girl play, who mysteriously comes into his life. A must read! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anastasia | 2/3/2014

    " Excellent read. I could read this book one hundred times over. I would recommend it to anyone. Definitely top ten. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Johanna | 2/3/2014

    " [audiobook] Loved this story. I listened to the audiobook from librevox.org "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joan | 2/1/2014

    " Set in England in the mid 19th-century, the story is about a linen-weaver, named Silas Marner, who experiences several terrible wrongs. As a young man, while living and working in a poor neighbourhood called Lantern Yard, his best friend, William Dane may have framed Silas concerning the theft of money from their church, an evangelical Protestant congregation. The community, including Silas' fiancee, Sarah, rejects Silas, so that he is forced to leave the city and travel to another town to re-start his life. He settles on the edge of a village called Raveloe and, while not friendly with the villagers, is able to make a good living. He spends very little and enjoys counting his gold. Again, trouble strikes and Silas' gold is stolen. The people of Raveloe feel sorry for Silas and one woman in particular, Mrs. Winthrop, the wheelwright's wife, encourages Silas to join the community, at least for church. Silas does not, but one evening, while much of the community is enjoying the New Year's party at the home of the local squire, a very little girl toddles away from her mother who has collapsed in the snow on her way to the squire's home into Silas' home. This is Baby Eppie. She is unclaimed by anyone as her mother is unknown in Raveloe and her father, the squire's son, does not acknowledge either of them because the marriage and child are secret and could wipe away his potential bride who is the daughter of a prosperous farmer. Eppie proves to be Silas' link to the community and his joy as he raises her and she brings out the best qualities of humanity, care for another, selflessness and loyalty, in him. The book was first published in 1861. As a staple on high school and college reading lists, many people have written about what Eliot meant to say in the novel. I found her thoughts about the upper class (didn't like them as well as the lower class), organized religion and women particularly interesting. Eliot seemed critical of the upper class. Squire Cass, who was a widower, was a poor father to his 4 boys - in contrast to Silas' thoughtful and caring attention to Eppie. Squire Cass' older son, Godfrey, only later in life assumed responsibility for his youthful mistakes. Dunston Cass was poorly behaved to animals, his family and society in general. The rich eat and drink too much and suffer from gout and other afflictions, while the poor savor what they have, and are generally healthier. Ultimately, when given a choice of which class to join, Eppie chooses to remain with her father rather than enjoy a softer life with the Cass'. Eliot seemed to have little use for organized religion. Despite the importance of church to Lantern Yard, no one gave Silas the benefit of the doubt when circumstantial evidence suggested that he was a thief. Spirituality and the golden rule are important as Mrs. Winthrop urges Silas not to weave on Sunday and puts holy letters on her baking, even though she can't read herself. I wasn't sure what Eliot thought about women, but I'm thinking she was sympathetic to the fact that their role in society didn't always take advantage of their strengths. When Squire Cass is criticizing his oldest son, he comments ' You're a shilly-shally fellow: you take after your poor mther. She never had a will of her own; a woman has no coall for one if she' got a proper man for her husband. But your wife had need have one,...' Miss Nancy who eventually weds Godfrey Cass is not well educated, going no further than the rudiments of reading and writing. Basic mathematics is hard as 'in order to balance an account, she was obliged to effect her subtraction by removing visible metallic shillings and sixpences from a visible metallic totals. and most servant-maids were better informed.: Nancy also seems to have limited insight into alternative decisions that could be made than what she perceives to be the rules. She insists that she and her sister wear the same dresses, simply because they are sisters. She believed that even a distant kinship with crime was a dishonor. The vocabulary is wonderful and includes some great words that I rarely/never come across. What is the Anthansian Creed? or Lytherly society? How does one hold ones head like a sodger? I'm glad to have a chance to enjoy this 'classic'. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Miranda | 1/31/2014

    " A good story and great writing "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kate Warren | 1/30/2014

    " Sweet story. Language caught me off guard at first, but I got used to it quickly. I was tempted to put it away for a while due to the slow start which tells a great deal of backstory. Glad I did not heed that impulse. I'll be on the lookout for more George Eliot. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Terri | 1/30/2014

    " Silas is betrayed by those he loves the most and withdraws into himself. Then he is given unconditional love and he is brought back. A good story about the power love has to hurt or heal our hearts. This is the first George Eliot book I've read and while I enjoyed it, it doesn't rank up with Austen or Bronte. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lisa (scarlet21) | 1/29/2014

    " An easy enough read, a bit moralistic but I did really enjoy it. A feel good book where the baddies got their comeuppance and good prevailed. Lots of lovely, lyrical writing that shows great understanding of the way the human mind works. Good portrayal of character - strong characters. A very enjoyable book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Wafa | 1/27/2014

    " fIRST CLASSICAL BOOK I LOVED "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hannah Taylor | 1/25/2014

    " I absolutely love this book :) its so sweet how Silas takes to the little girl <3 "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Emese | 1/20/2014

    " A classic! Heart warming tale of an old man and a baby girl who grows up into a lovely young woman and their loylaty for each other "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brett | 1/19/2014

    " At first I found Silas Marner to be boring and utterly alien. The people in the story saw the world so differently. But ultimately this ends up being a story with a lot to say about people, no matter when and how they were brought up. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David | 1/19/2014

    " It actually turned out to be a page turner. Great story of fate and personal choices driving one's life. As nearsighted as Silas was, as blind he was when the baby entered the house, he instantly recognized the gift when he was faced with it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Meadow | 1/18/2014

    " it was really sweet. Little Eppie just captures your heart, and the plots within the plots are quite good. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michelle Guffey | 1/18/2014

    " My first George Eliot and a little difficult to start, but I really liked it, and it was short. And the story had a timeless meaning, with lots of symbolism, and real characters that you would expect from a classic. Eliot's writing style included lots of side comments to the reader, which were insightful, sarcastic and were basically my favorite part. This was an excellent book club choice as it was fun to discuss too. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rachel Ingram | 1/17/2014

    " For such a short book, there is so much to enjoy, though perseverance is key in the first third. The darkness does give way to light! No more can be said without spoilers. I loved the country voices especially hearing 'Maaaaaster Marrrnerr' as I read. In conclusion, a wonderful story of emotional highs and lows. Love Eliot's writing, a joy. P.S. I managed to find the BBC's 1985 adaptation on YouTube after I'd finished, with Ben Kingsley and Jim Broadbent!!! Some bits missing from the book, but worth watching. Wait 'till you see who plays Eppie! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tnahsin Garg | 1/15/2014

    " A book that is rich with language...Eliot is a mistress of prose...Her philosophical insights and character analysis are supreme. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 James | 1/13/2014

    " This "classic" is very good. I enjoy books that shows the transformation of good people into better people. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 E | 1/11/2014

    " I thought this a moving story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kerrie | 1/11/2014

    " Once I managed to figure out the slang I managed to get into it "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tom Lichtenberg | 1/10/2014

    " character, plot, action, emotion, dialogue - this novel has it all at the very highest level. what an excellent book! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Debbie Beshears | 1/9/2014

    " When we were told in High School that we had to read this book, everyone (including me) groaned. I was really surprised that I really liked this book! I enjoyed reading it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Zumana | 1/9/2014

    " This book is about a very strange man. He lived in a quiet village and fell in love with his best friend. The other village people banished him from his home. They thought that he stole money and riches. There is a great ending to this novel. It teaches the reader about life lessons. People cannot always get what they wnat when they want it. It takes a lot of hard work to succeed in life because life is not easy. There is some sensory images, but it is mostly written in metaphors. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Evan | 1/7/2014

    " I never read this in school, so when found it for 99 pesos I decided to give it a go. Interesting characters and overall a pretty good story. The choice of cover art for this edition is bizarre - it's a man working in a forge with a little girl [Marner is a weaver]. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kate | 1/7/2014

    " Middlemarch is one of my favorite books ever, and perhaps that gave me high standards for this book. It was not, by far, one of the better books I've read recently - but I did enjoy it, and do think it has its own merits. Suffice to say that, in the end, I think it was too simplistic. If you're going to read something by Eliot, read Middlemarch. Just do it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cess | 1/6/2014

    " His gold was gone but what he found afterwards is the greatest treasure of all, his daughter. The story talks about how a man's life was changed after he lost his gold. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Heather | 1/6/2014

    " The beginning was omnipotent POV torture, but it got rolling once Elliot moved from scene setting into Marner's story. The romanticism and morality laid heavy in the narrator's voice and plot, but not any worse than other female writers of this time period. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sarah Mirabile | 1/6/2014

    " Not my favorite, I think I should re-read it. I read it in 9th grade, so now I might understand it better. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jac | 1/4/2014

    " how can you like a book when they make you read it. all i wanted was mad comics. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Donna Bijas | 1/1/2014

    " Story of a miser. Wondefully written. Very quick read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Fiona Robson | 12/31/2013

    " Really, really enjoyed this one. One of those books I've always felt I should read and have only just got around to it. Excellent story, but frustrating throughout that Silas had been wrongly charged with theft and was never quite vindicated for that. Happy ending and worth reading. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Allyson | 12/26/2013

    " I enjoyed reading about each different person in the book. I liked to read how Silas and Godfrey for better and worse and the way it effected their lives. I really enjoyed all of the personalities in the book and seeing what happens to each of them. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Angharad | 12/26/2013

    " There is no other way to put it - I hated this book with a passion. Possibly because I had to do it at school, but, ugh. It was AWFUL! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Winter | 12/25/2013

    " This book was hard to get into, but was very touching and offered an important lesson in life. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Edith | 12/17/2013

    " Love this book! I've read it three times now and it gets better every time! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Aumogh Sengupta | 12/13/2013

    " Was really very good.Nothing like it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alex Zarate | 12/11/2013

    " A nice read if your looking for a story with a happy ending which many don't have now in days. Check out the movie staring Sir Ben Kingsley. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Maryann | 12/8/2013

    " I read this book about 10 years ago. From what I remember, I didn't really like it. It was clean, but a little drab. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Danielle Hippert | 12/7/2013

    " One of the greatest classics I have ever read. You cannot help but fall in love with Silas. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Karen | 12/6/2013

    " Loved the language and prose. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chuck | 12/4/2013

    " Here's my choice for melodrama! I've read this book over and over again and still enjoy it. It's a great find from my high school reading list. Some things about high school do endure! I was going to give it lesser stars but hey, it has staying power. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ramonamcconkie | 11/26/2013

    " 4.5 There is a reason this is a classic. I love that there is no fear or even realization that the authors of this time period were presenting what are now conflicting moral views and absolutes. How refreshing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dania | 11/24/2013

    " At first Silas Marner was a difficult read and I had to fore myself to go through the first half of the book but as the book came to an end, it took a turn and I enjoyed it immensely. I loved the ending, it was a happy, satisfying ending. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Melodie | 11/22/2013

    " One of the worst books ever foisted upon the American people!! Hated it in high school & it's even worse now! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Annapurna Barry | 11/16/2013

    " Every page was like torture. I'm definitely not an Eliot fan, probably because I hate Victorian Realism. Yawn. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mitch Duckworth | 11/9/2013

    " Read so long ago, I cannot remember why this book impressed me; it was required reading and I know that I resisted it for the the first half, but was pulled in, and gained enthusiasm, fairly galloping toward the end. No, it was not because it was almost over. Another read is in order. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kaethe | 11/8/2013

    " I think there should be more stories about misers and about the adorable orphans who teach them about love. Really, I'd much rather read about manic pixie dream girls who are girls rather than grown women. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ruth | 11/4/2013

    " Eliot's abilities with language never cease to amaze. Neither do her sharp observations of human behavior. No wonder she's my favorite author. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Lily | 10/31/2013

    " LbW selection, February, 2009. Had fun with students who participated online. The story, however, seems light weight at this point to me. I know I did also read this one years and years ago. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Audra | 10/21/2013

    " Everything about this book is compelling, from the characters to the plot twists. Even though it is from another century, and the characters and prose are written as such, I still found it hard to put down. LOVED IT. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jonathan Falconer | 10/19/2013

    " Not bad. Will written, however the best part was right at the end and even that was terribly corny. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elisabeth Bier | 10/18/2013

    " Such a good story about parental love and the love of riches. Great moral. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elizabeth | 10/17/2013

    " Small and neat, with many of the same themes and character types as Eliot's other novels A bit sentimental at the end, even for me. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ann Scott | 10/2/2013

    " Had to read for a class. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Terry | 9/13/2013

    " This is a great novel which illustrates that love for people and love of money are both life determining quests. It takes place in the middle ages (probably) in England. Silas is a poor weaver who is robbed but who later finds an orphan whom he raises and loves. Good book! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Robert Borcherding | 8/10/2013

    " An excellent tale of human nature. Highly recommended. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Terry | 7/30/2013

    " This is a great novel which illustrates that love for people and love of money are both life determining quests. It takes place in the middle ages (probably) in England. Silas is a poor weaver who is robbed but who later finds an orphan whom he raises and loves. Good book! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 John Howlett | 7/29/2013

    " Read this now because I never did read it back in school. Made a good decision back in school... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Aja | 7/21/2013

    " This was a really cool book. I was excited to read it because it is my mom's favortite. I learned many things from it, especially since we studied it in class. It is so sweet how Eppie turns Silas' life around by her goodness. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Toria | 7/20/2013

    " A lovely demonstration of what's important in life - people, not money. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lee Margaret | 7/18/2013

    " I read this in my bookclub a while back and I really liked it. It's an interesting read and does have a surprise twist in the book that you will have to read to find out. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Pallavi Mehta | 7/10/2013

    " A heavenly written mystery with beautiful writing. The most amazing descriptions of the English country are probably written by Gearge Elliot. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brenda Morris | 7/6/2013

    " I think you need to enjoy period books to really enjoy this book. However, it's also a wonderful story about opening oneself up to love and the importance of personal integrity. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Roni | 6/30/2013

    " I loved this book. I really loved the style of writing by George Eliot. It is a lot like Charlotte Brontes' in Jane Erye. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Grace Best-Page | 6/7/2013

    " A timeless story - I read it in high school and it still resonates with me. It feels like a warm friend. Some may find the style old-fashioned, but I loved it then and I love it now. Oh, and the Ben Kingsley movie version does it justice. I love it, too. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Timm | 6/6/2013

    " An excellent story with a ironical twist. The triumph of good over evil. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sarah | 6/3/2013

    " So the story actually started at the end.. I was bored stiff. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mark | 5/24/2013

    " Miserly old man comes to raise a little girl by an accident of fate, and through her is drawn out of his isolation and into some kind of happy place in the community. This was heartwarming. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Skylerpix | 5/21/2013

    " Excellent read! Don't be deceived by the slow, depressing beginning. It just sets it up for a fabulous ending! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Terry | 5/19/2013

    " This is a great novel which illustrates that love for people and love of money are both life determining quests. It takes place in the middle ages (probably) in England. Silas is a poor weaver who is robbed but who later finds an orphan whom he raises and loves. Good book! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kay | 5/3/2013

    " Classic. Sweet story of the power others can have in helping to heal. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Stephan | 3/21/2013

    " Thus book is worth the time, but barely, and cause it's short. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jlynn | 3/7/2013

    " I quite liked this book. It's a good (if simple) story, and the writing is top notch. Amateur historians, especially church historians, will be fascinated by some of the events alluded to. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kealan O'ver | 2/26/2013

    " Too short to get engrossed in. Too dull to be gripped. Not bad but there's nothing really to it and several of the character relations are developed for no good reason. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tim | 2/16/2013

    " Maybe the smartest and most beautiful Victorian novel. Incredibly progressive and understanding about class, religion, etc. Even today, we need more people in the world like Silas Marner. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jonathan | 1/31/2013

    " A tale of love and hope. Found it a bit difficult to follow dialogue at times. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elisabeth Kujawa | 1/21/2013

    " Much better then I expected! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tom Brashear | 1/8/2013

    " I claim I can not stand this book as I was made to read it for High School English and Literature Class. But truth be known, it probably had a significant impact on how I write. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elisabeth Kujawa | 12/29/2012

    " Much better then I expected! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Aimee (528491) | 12/15/2012

    " It was hard to get through; the sentences were endless! But the storykept me interested, and in the end, everyone got what they deserved. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Karen Williams | 12/12/2012

    " This was one of my father's favorite books. He said it had it all- greed, temptation, lust, prejudice, love, compassion, selfishness, etc. It even has a happy ending! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Andrea | 12/8/2012

    " I liked it more than any other George Eliot book I've read. And suddenly, I'm understanding all sorts of "Eppie" jokes from high school. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Karen | 8/15/2012

    " Loved the language and prose. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Martha Johnson | 7/26/2012

    " You have to suffer the language a bit but the story is so wonderful. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Keriann | 7/5/2012

    " Read for my class on the 19th Century Novel. I quite liked it. The part in which Silas discovers Eppie actually made me tear up. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Johanna | 6/18/2012

    " [audiobook] Loved this story. I listened to the audiobook from librevox.org "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chuck | 6/4/2012

    " Here's my choice for melodrama! I've read this book over and over again and still enjoy it. It's a great find from my high school reading list. Some things about high school do endure! I was going to give it lesser stars but hey, it has staying power. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kalessin | 6/4/2012

    " Better than Mary Barton, but still not one of my favorites. Sorry, Professor Ward. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Beth Shirley | 5/7/2012

    " This is a fantastic classic. I would recommend this for fans of the Bronte's, as Eliot has those Romantic and Gothic elements they love so much, without the sentimentality that can plague Jane Austen's work (Note: I do love Jane Austen, but the woman could be a little sentimental.) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jade | 4/5/2012

    " A slow read..until you find Molly and Eppie. That's when it got interesting. Molly and Eppie really bring the two plots of the story together. Currently annotating and note-taking for the rapidly approaching essay that I'll be writing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 James | 3/20/2012

    " This "classic" is very good. I enjoy books that shows the transformation of good people into better people. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jade | 2/20/2012

    " A slow read..until you find Molly and Eppie. That's when it got interesting. Molly and Eppie really bring the two plots of the story together. Currently annotating and note-taking for the rapidly approaching essay that I'll be writing. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 David Jordan | 2/18/2012

    " Trekked through this in a high school lit class, and it was a LONG journey. Boring and depressing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alysia | 2/3/2012

    " Lovely! I think this would make a great movie. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Corey Mcnair | 1/19/2012

    " Old Victorian novel that is very familiar, but the strength of it is that themes are so clearly presented, the book wins you over. Typically don't like heavy handed symbolism but it doesn't matter because Silas is so fully realized as a character. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Amber | 1/16/2012

    " Listened to this one. Very sweet story. Easy and simple and nice. Kind of a classic story of the old miserly man who isn't as miserly as everyone thinks. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cherrylea | 11/21/2011

    " I suppose it was okay, but a bit too dull for my tastes... (English analysis - can you blame me?) "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Maryann | 11/11/2011

    " I read this book about 10 years ago. From what I remember, I didn't really like it. It was clean, but a little drab. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Paul Gier | 10/28/2011

    " A little hard to get into at first, but pretty enjoyable. It's interesting to see some of the differences in the writing style of when this book was written (1861) compared to now. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 London | 10/8/2011

    " The Shelf: Rejected, pending reconsideration. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sɑɳɗrɑ☼ | 9/10/2011

    " It was good, but too descriptive and things progressed SO SLOWLY!!! It was scandulous but good! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carrie | 8/12/2011

    " I was a little worried at first that this would be a sad story along the lines of Thomas Hardy but I was pleasantly surprised and quite enjoyed listening to it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 A | 7/25/2011

    " At first, I was a bit dubious of "Silas Marner," but this book turned out to be excellent. I believe it should be the posterchild of the "Money Can't Buy Happiness" slogan. Well done, Mr. Eliot. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Thequaminator | 5/16/2011

    " One of the best stories. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tim | 5/14/2011

    " Just a delightful story, a true classic. The prose style can keep you on your toes, commas, semi-colons and colons abound, so skimming is not going to happen; but who would want to as Ms. Eliot expertly weaves some social commentary into her simple moral tale. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 V.E. | 5/12/2011

    " It was a little hard to get through but a pretty sweet story anyway. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anastasia | 4/30/2011

    " Excellent read. I could read this book one hundred times over. I would recommend it to anyone. Definitely top ten. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shelby | 4/30/2011

    " One of my favorites. I need to read it again but I remember being wholly glad that I did. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michelle | 4/29/2011

    " I was pleasantly surprised by this book. Granted there were a few places that got a bit verbose for me, but I was intrigued by the characters and how things did and did not turn out for them. I loved the underlying theme of how love can change a character. Worth a read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jerry | 4/26/2011

    " I skipped reading this book in high school. What a treasure I missed by not reading it then. It is a marvelous book and I heartily recommend it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Corey | 4/25/2011

    " Old Victorian novel that is very familiar, but the strength of it is that themes are so clearly presented, the book wins you over. Typically don't like heavy handed symbolism but it doesn't matter because Silas is so fully realized as a character. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Susan | 4/13/2011

    " I found the first two thirds tedious. But when Eppy came to live with him, not only was Silas redeemed, but the book was redeemed. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Tony | 4/13/2011

    " After wading my way through 100 pages or so of frequently opaque syntax, I find that there was very little point or drama to this story. "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author
Author George Eliot

George Eliot, the pen name of Mary Ann, or Marian, Evans (1819–1880), was an English Victorian novelist of the first rank. An assistant editor for the Westminster Review from 1851 to 1854, she wrote her first fiction in 1857 and her first full-length novel, Adam Bede, in 1859. In her writing, she was chiefly preoccupied with moral problems, especially the moral development and psychological analysis of her characters. She is known for her sensitive and honest depiction of life and people in works that are acclaimed as classics.

About the Narrator

Geraldine James, OBE, is a four-time BAFTA TV Award nominee who was also nominated for a Tony Award for her role in Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice. She has appeared in such notable films as Alice in Wonderland, Sherlock Holmes, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, and Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows, among many others.