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Extended Audio Sample Queen Bee Moms & Kingpin Dads: Dealing with the Difficult Parents in Your Childs Life Audiobook, by Rosalind Wiseman Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (233 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Rosalind Wiseman, Elizabeth Rapoport Narrator: Lee Adams Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2006 ISBN: 9781415932131
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What happens to Queen Bees and Wannabes when they grow up?

Even the most well-adjusted moms and dads can experience peer pressure and conflicts with other adults that make them act like they’re back in seventh grade. In Queen Bee Moms & Kingpin Dads, Rosalind Wiseman gives us the tools to handle difficult situations involving teachers and other parents with grace. Reassuring, funny, and unfailingly honest, Wiseman reveals:

• Why PTA meetings and Back-to-School nights tap into parents’ deepest insecurities

• How to recognize the archetypal moms and dads—from Caveman Dad to Hovercraft Mom

• How and when to step in and step out of your child’s conflicts with other children, parents, teachers, or coaches

• How to interpret the code phrases other parents use to avoid (or provoke) confrontation

• Why too many well-meaning dads sit on the sidelines, and how vital it is that they step up to the plate

• What to do and say when the playing field becomes an arena for people to bully and dominate other kids and adults

• How to have respectful yet honest conversations with other parents about sex and drugs when your values are in conflict

• How the way you handle parties, risky behavior, and academic performance affects your child

• How unspoken assumptions about race, religion, and other hot-button subjects sabotage parents’ ability to work together

Queen Bee Moms & Kingpin Dads is filled with the kind of true stories that made Wiseman’s New York Times bestselling book Queen Bees & Wannabes impossible to put down. There are tales of hardworking parents with whom any of us can identify, along with tales of outrageously bad parents—the kind we all have to reckon with. For instance, what do you do when parents donate a large sum of money to a school and their child is promptly transferred into the honors program–while your son with better grades doesn’t make the cut? What about the mother who helps her daughter compose poison-pen e-mails to yours? And what do you say to the parent-coach who screams at your child when the team is losing? Wiseman offers practical advice on avoiding the most common parenting “land mines” and useful scripts to help you navigate difficult but necessary conversations.

Queen Bee Moms & Kingpin Dads is essential reading for parents today. It offers us the tools to become wiser, more relaxed parents–and the inspiration to speak out, act according to our values, show humility, and set the kind of example that will make a real difference in our children’s lives.


Also available as a Random House AudioBook and as an eBook Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • Rosalind Wiseman has a good ear and a good eye. She watches and listens to the every day talk of kids and adults and hears and sees below the surface to identify important underlying social realities. In Queen Bee Moms and Kingpin Dads she provides a road map for parents to help them negotiate the treacherous waters of adult peer culture on behalf of their children and their own peace of mind. James Garbarino, Ph.D., author of See Jane Hit and Lost Boys
  • Queen Bee Moms and Kingpin Dads is honest and wise. As a father, I found the insights, stories and practical information in this book very powerful. As a professional, I found the book's basic premise to be profoundly important to the field of child development. Rosalind Wiseman asks nothing less of us than basic human civility. Michael Gurian, author of The Minds of Boys and The Wonder of Girls
  • Wise yet practical and full of humor, Queen Bee Moms & Kingpin Dads is a must-read for parents who want to deal with the other adults in their children’s lives with skill and compassion, rather than wrath and confusion. Rosalind Wiseman’s thoughtful suggestions will spare parents endless conflicts and substitute creative interventions. This book forces us to look ourselves in the mirror and face both our strengths and weaknesses while inspiring us to act as strong yet empathic role models for our children in a much-too-pressured and competitive world. William Pollack, author of Real Boys: Rescuing Our Sons from the Myths of Boyhood
  • Rosalind Wiseman is consistently amazing for her window on the real world. As always, she has an uncanny knack for characterizing people whom we see every day, and I found her stories compelling and poignant. Her advice is specific and to the point and can only be extremely helpful to parents taking on the humbling and perplexing world of the other adults who play such a big part in their own kids' lives. Above all, I found the book extraordinarily compassionate. Anthony Wolf, Ph.D., author of Get Out of My Life, But First Could You Drive Me and Cheryl to the Mall?
  • Wise, funny, real, and right on, Queen Bee Moms & Kingpin Dads will be your bible for handling the adults in your child’s life – including yourself – with dignity and grace. Reading this book is an act of courage and love on behalf of your family. —Rachel Simmons, author of Odd Girl Out: The Hidden Culture of Aggression in Girls

Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mary | 2/20/2014

    " This is a terrific read for moms who stay at home part time or full time. The similarities between our world and that of the teenage girl is scary..... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jenn | 2/13/2014

    " There are some mothers/fathers that are very anxious and are going through some very hard times when there children are going to school. One comment in particular, the one below is the exact reason why this book was written. Although her review was very well thought out and she explained herself beautifully I feel like she lacked compassion for people like myself who may not be as strong emotionally as she says she is. I hope she can look at the book and learn from it that there are people in the world that do feel this way. I too am oblivious most of the time. I have a busy life as well. But for some reason my anxiety level shoots through the roof when I have to get involved with anything to do with my children's school. I think Rosalnd Wiseman was just trying to help people like myself by using categories and analyzing and breaking apart why there are the mothers who feel the need to be popular "again" or the wannabes. Or the mothers like myself who thought my children's friends would have had some nice parents attached to them and every now and then we can get together for a play date or family BBQ. But thats not the case. Although I am completely satisfied with my social life I feel guilty that when I try to make a play date for my children and there's that biAtch of a mother who says she's busy yet has play dates with everyone else. Because of who I AM its hard for me to not take it personally. I have heard that I am to pretty...or to young (I am older then I look)...or to shy....or I look like a snob. Instead of getting to know me I am judged. I find myself judging everyone else now because they are judging me. Its just an uncomfortable situation all the way around and if there weren't as many parents that feel the way I do, the book would not have been written. I think the book is bittersweet. It's honest and it tells you what kind of mother you are. Look at it as a learning experience. If your the Queens BEE realize you may be hurting someone with your actions and if your the invisible mom...she explains why you may be feeling that way. Its not mean't to upset people, its written to help someone like myself who may not see that I may causing my own problem. It may be my own insecurity. If the Queen bee doesn't talk to me its her own issue, it really has nothing to do with me. Its like a self help book and I recommend it to anyone who who is going through it and thinks they are alone. reply | edit | delete | flag * "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Heidi Schulz | 2/6/2014

    " I didn't feel like it really applied to me as a homeschool mom. Or maybe my daughter is too young to deal with some of the issues... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nancy | 2/6/2014

    " Wow! Must read for parents (yeah...dads too)....raises some very interesting thoughts.... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rose | 1/18/2014

    " Apropos for all those parents out there dealing with "other" personnel who impact your kids. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nadine | 1/10/2014

    " Honestly a must for any parent who finds navigating other parents to be tougher than dealing with their own kids! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Laura Lea | 1/8/2014

    " This book not only showed me what to look out for in other parents, but what to look out for in my own behaviors I find myself consciously aware my own actions, so that others don't perceive me as a Queen Bee Mom. Lord knows we have enough Queen Bees and Kingpins in this town as it is. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Wendy | 1/6/2014

    " This book discusses the different roles moms have in the adult version of cliques, and how the same roles one had in junior high can persist in adulthood. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julie | 12/19/2013

    " Love Rosalind Wiseman. This book's not quite as perfectly organized as Queen Bees & Wannabes, and has a lot of repeat information from that book. The most valuable insights aren't about other parents but about your own behavior... tricky of her, eh? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Missy | 12/4/2013

    " This should be required reading for all grown-ups. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amy | 12/1/2013

    " Proves that high school never actually ends when you graduate. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joshua | 11/7/2013

    " This is a good book that will help parents learn how to deal with: other parents, teachers, coaches, and their own children. It is a great followup to "Queen Bees and Wannabees," the book that inspired the movie "Mean Girls". "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gnmsmom | 11/5/2013

    " I really wanted to like this book, to find it helpful. But it focused so much on school-based situations that I felt it didn't have much relationship to my family's life. Also, I found it kind of frustrating that I never did figure out what "type" I am. Reformed Invisible? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rosemary | 9/18/2013

    " a must read for parents of teens! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gillian | 9/13/2013

    " Some interesting stuff in here about conflict resolution ... lots of it is geared more toward middle school and high school parents... I found the whole section about the different "types" of moms and dads really irritating and limited. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Angelique | 7/1/2013

    " I can't say I was that impressed with this book. Lots of time was spent giving great examples of the trials and tribulations of dealing with schools without any practical advice on how to handle the situations. Her first book was much better. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christine | 3/23/2013

    " I think this book should be required reading once your child enters elementary school! :) "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ginny | 2/12/2013

    " Fascinating, but makes me very glad we homeschool. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amber | 6/26/2012

    " This book points out how little we've evolved since high school. Helpful and insightful. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura | 5/30/2012

    " Found this one much more interesting and helpful in the sense that I may have to go someday and either deal with the administration on my kid's behalf, or, gulp, be the parent on the receiving end of all the fire. Easy to read, fascinating sociology going on, I recommend it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Martha | 4/1/2012

    " This was a great book that I want to re-read when my kids get a little older. It had a lot of good tips and things I remember dealing with as a kid too. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Laura | 2/26/2012

    " I don't read much popular psychology, but I found this book very useful. It gave me many insights into dealing with other parents and also teachers and coaches. It also made me think twice about why I am so involved at the boys' school (ie for my benefit or theirs?) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shelly | 2/15/2012

    " Read this in preparation for PTA this year. I am scared! :) Ami, should I pass it over? "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Kirei | 8/17/2011

    " I couldn't relate to this book at all. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shannon | 7/15/2011

    " Wow, this book makes me never want to let my kids out of my sight for fear of all the insecurities of other adults that will spill out into how they treat my children. It's a great read and it makes you take an honest look at you and the adults around your children. Not finished with it yet. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rosemary | 4/20/2011

    " a must read for parents of teens! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gillian | 3/23/2011

    " Some interesting stuff in here about conflict resolution ... lots of it is geared more toward middle school and high school parents... I found the whole section about the different "types" of moms and dads really irritating and limited. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joshua | 1/31/2011

    " This is a good book that will help parents learn how to deal with: other parents, teachers, coaches, and their own children. It is a great followup to "Queen Bees and Wannabees," the book that inspired the movie "Mean Girls". "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christine | 12/27/2010

    " I think this book should be required reading once your child enters elementary school! :) "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Kirei | 8/3/2010

    " I couldn't relate to this book at all. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Laura | 8/2/2010

    " I don't read much popular psychology, but I found this book very useful. It gave me many insights into dealing with other parents and also teachers and coaches. It also made me think twice about why I am so involved at the boys' school (ie for my benefit or theirs?) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rachelle | 11/16/2009

    " This is a great book because it helped me see how I behave in certain situations with other mothers and why. After reading it, I can see the "roles" that Wiseman talks about, and I'm less likely to get sucked into the frey of mom politics. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Amanda | 10/13/2009

    " It was good, but it became repetitive and painful to hear about PTA moms. Once you get the idea that PTA moms are cliquish, just like in middle school, you get the point. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jean | 9/24/2009

    " I found her classification systems don't really cover everyone. However, there are some great tips on how to deal with other parents and tough parenting situations. It also helps see groups of moms and dads for who they really might be as well as how they operate. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura | 8/19/2009

    " Found this one much more interesting and helpful in the sense that I may have to go someday and either deal with the administration on my kid's behalf, or, gulp, be the parent on the receiving end of all the fire. Easy to read, fascinating sociology going on, I recommend it. "

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About the Author
Author Rosalind Wiseman

Rosalind Wiseman is an internationally recognized expert on children, parenting, bullying, social justice, and ethical leadership, and the New York Times bestselling author of Queen Bees and Wannabes and Queen Bee Moms and Kingpin Dads.

About the Narrator

Lee Adams has been a voice artist for many years. Her work for the Educational Television Network can be heard on an array of videos, television series, station identifications, and commercials. She is also an accomplished singer/songwriter and lends her talents to various animation projects whenever possible. Lee has narrated both fiction and nonfiction audiobooks.