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Extended Audio Sample Metamorphoses Audiobook, by Ovid Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (21,164 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Ovid Narrator: Barry Kraft Publisher: Blackstone Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: January 2008 ISBN: 9781455189977
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Ovid’s sensuous and witty poem brings together a dazzling array of mythological tales ingeniously linked by the idea of transformation, often as a result of love or lust, in which men and women find themselves magically changed into new and sometimes extraordinary beings. Beginning with the creation of the world and ending with the deification of Augustus, Ovid interweaves many of the best known myths and legends of ancient Greece and Rome, including Daedalus and Icarus, Pyramus and Thisbe, Pygmalion, Perseus and Andromeda, and the fall of Troy. Mortals become gods, animals turn to stone, and humans change into flowers, trees, or stars.

First published in AD 8, Ovid’s Metamorphoses remains one of the most accessible and inspirational introductions to Greek mythology.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “It is Ovid’s perhaps unique genius to offer his tales of transformed bodies both as metaphors for the pivotal moments of the human life cycle and as comments on the social construction of that life cycle in his own time.”

    Robert Squillace, professor, New York University

  • “In Ovid’s witty, sensuous poem no one ever remains the same…Narrator Barry Kraft has picked up this energy, sharply and precisely attacking each word of Miller's translation…[He] batters us, wave upon wave, with the archetypal power of each tale…This is a refresher course in mythology at its best.”

    AudioFile

  • “Ovid's Metamorphoses, in winding its way through the ages to modern times, lavished its own beneficence on literary traditions, from his contemporaries th the medieval moralizers to enlightened neo-Agustans.”

    Masterpieces of World Literature

Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Linsey | 2/20/2014

    " I feel like I would like this a lot more if I wasn't being forced to read it due to a course. It is one of those books that has been on my to-read list for sometimes, and really it is rather like picking up the bible and deciding that might be some nice light reading. It is the same sort of idea really, origin myths in place, stories of gods and men but instead of from Christian mythology, it is Greek mythology. There is nothing wrong with that of course, and there is every chance I will pick up this book again some time in the future and maybe then I will enjoy it more because I am not speed-reading in attempt to make an essay make sense. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Matt Sime | 2/14/2014

    " An easier read than Virgil's Aeneid, but most of that credit goes to translator David R. Slavitt. Not really an epic poem, and certainly not a traditional story structure - I've never read a poem like this. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ryan | 2/13/2014

    " Ovid was quite enjoyable, entertaining the reader with his stories and myths and tales of the Greek and Roman gods and heroes. His theory in book XV about souls gliding aimlessly between creatures and men is strange, to say the least, but it's interesting to read about it. Overall, Metamorphoses entertained and educated me about the Greek and Roman myths, which is a nice treat for a school book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Peter Kolesnikov | 2/12/2014

    " What does one say about such an icon of world literature that hasn't been said a thousand times before? A collection of stories gathered from Greco-roman sources woven together into a semi-cohesive narrative based on the recurrence of various transformations, it has served as an inspiration for Shakespeare and many lesser writers in the western canon. I absolutely love it and have read it in various translations, both verse and prose, over the years. Highly recommend. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jendar | 2/11/2014

    " This books contains a bunch of short stories all related to Greek mythology. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 AJ Henning | 2/10/2014

    " not to give any spoilers or nothin', but everyone turns into a bird or rock. seriously. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elena | 2/10/2014

    " Se dovessi scegliere , e' uno dei libri che mi porterei su un'isola deserta!!! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jillian | 2/1/2014

    " LOVE. If you want to read and understand literary refernces or write something actually worthwhile you must have read Ovid. It also helped me appreciate art much more, as so many great works and artists focus on mythology. This is, as far as I'm concerned, the Mythologists Bible. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Leah | 1/27/2014

    " I'll always like the Humphries translation best, but... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brad | 1/24/2014

    " I read the Signet Classics version which was a publication of the translation by Horace Gregory. I would like to read this again. It was fun, interesting, bawdy, and playful. It put some fun familiar myths in greater perspective, and introduced me to many more that I had not previously known. Sometimes the meaning and direction got a bit lost in the poetry, but that failure can only be laid on the reader. I was surprised at how light it was in tone and in dealing with it's subject matter. Homer seemed to have a level of reverent respect for the gods and their doings while Ovid seemed ready to poke fun at the slightest provocation. Touched too many great themes to number, it also included too many moments that made be blush to bother mentioning. I began to wonder if Ovid's morality was typical of his day or if he stood more on the 'saucy' side of things. All and all, well worth a read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Douglas | 1/24/2014

    " Interesting translation, lyrical prose rather than an attempt to shoehorn the poetry. This is one of the better translations if you're not a fan a poetry. A classic that I have found references to all over the place since I started reading it again. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bridgett | 1/18/2014

    " It doesn't get any more "classic" than this. I definitely need to re-read this! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Benni | 1/15/2014

    " My favorite translation of Ovid's Metamorphoses. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Paquita Maria Sanchez | 1/15/2014

    " I'm re-reading this from bits I consumed throughout my youf as a mythology dork, but the use of Roman names rather than their Greek equivalents requires a lot of stopping and re-referencing to figure out who the F. is being discussed. My Roman numerals suck too, since we're on the subject. Anyway, I decided to restart this in conjunction with reading Venus in Furs because that novel brought to mind the Pygmalion myth, which brings to mind The Sea Came in at Midnight, and somehow these all conglomerate in my head in a scattered mess which I hope to some day knit into a scarf for the frigid, blistery-cold Austin, Texas summer. It also reminds me of the movie Mannequin and what naturally and immediately follows, the American band Jefferson Starship (the last part being of no consequence whatsoever, just a side note). Don't judge me. Why am I spending my time this way? Because I was an 8 year undergraduate, and I am a bit lost without a project, so I decided to invent one. Don't judge me; I went out for 3 or 4 hours on Saturday. I will rehash these points in my von Sacher-Masoch review, once they make some semblance of sense. Don't juuuudge me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laurel | 1/9/2014

    " I read a large chunk of this book and continued reading parts that I wasn't assigned to read in college instead of whatever book we were assigned to read next. I dig it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jackie | 1/3/2014

    " Was required reading for my Minor in Classical Civilizations. Read it in 3 days it was so good. Tales of Greek Mythology. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Michelle Bacon | 12/23/2013

    " Maybe a bit deep for me, but wow. People turning into animals and changing their gender and just all kinds of wild things in this book. Mythology always made me scratch my head a bit. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 John Yelverton | 12/21/2013

    " A decent piece and example of classic and ancient stage plays. Should only be read by a fan of Greek mythology though, or it will bore you to tears. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Morgan (Turbo) | 12/21/2013

    " Liked it but many of the stories have predictable endings: metamorphoses! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Shelley | 12/16/2013

    " This Mary Innes translation was very enjoyable. Soem of the scenes, such as the slaughter of Niobe's children, will stay with me. It helps to read this book in batches and with a dictionary of classical mythology by your side. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Summer | 12/16/2013

    " Roman attempt to link all Greco-Roman myth cycles. Very thorough and entertaining. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elizabeth | 12/14/2013

    " One of my favorite books. Sort of a hard read if you don't have time to sit down and get through it, but if you can, absolutely rewarding. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Malyssa | 11/19/2013

    " Great, great, great! Read it and you will see! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura Martyn | 11/12/2013

    " I'm enjoying this quite a bit... it's surprising in it's cheekiness! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Akiko | 11/10/2013

    " A lot of European artwork depict scenes from the Metamorphoses. Provides a really good foundation if you want to appreciate art a little more. Would recommend this particular version as it has very good footnotes. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rob | 10/27/2013

    " Brillant and it hugely influenced Shakespeare. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lisa | 10/26/2013

    " I read this at university studying English. (I would have read it first during the summer preceding the course work because I always did that). I liked the Amores better! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sean Carman | 10/26/2013

    " A treasure trove of strange tales of men and women being turned into birds, mountains, the morning dew, doves, trees, deer, and flowers by the vengeful gods. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Danica Davidson | 10/21/2013

    " This is one of my favorites. I've read it more than once. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Iain Coggins | 10/11/2013

    " The most beautiful English translation of Ovid I've encountered! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alissa | 10/4/2013

    " Sexy. Read this, listen to some Portishead, drink some red wine and game over. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laurie Mekelburg | 9/11/2013

    " Easy book to read because each story is separate. This allows you to read one or ten, depending on the time you have. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Celeste | 8/28/2013

    " What the fuck Ovid. Save some brilliance for the rest of us. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rebekah | 8/21/2013

    " So far I've read Book 1 in Latin, and in English, Books 1, 6-8, 10, and 12-15. The language is beautiful, with more varied vocabulary than Vergil's Aeneid. I have a feeling I'll enjoy it more when I read more of it in the original language. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tom | 7/18/2013

    " Wow! Ovid could probably give lessons to Stephen King! There are hundreds of stories, many nested within others. I found it to be a great read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Minyoung Lee | 7/10/2013

    " Beautiful translation of a classic story. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rosemary | 2/1/2013

    " Not easy to read but an amazing book. I like the rhythm of this translation too. It's easy enough to follow (as much as it can be, with so many names to keep track of) without being too modern. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tana | 1/19/2013

    " This translation is exquisite. I find new lines in this text that drop me to my knees for their beauty. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amanda | 1/7/2013

    " Very rich telling, with lots of sideways references to other myths of Ovid's time. Loved how it often filled in parts of myths that weren't expounded upon in other major epics (e.g. Iliad, Odyssey, Aeneid). A great balance between Callimachean and epic poetry. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chip | 12/20/2012

    " So that's how that flower got its name! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Madeline | 12/6/2012

    " Amazing. Read parts of it for the first time when I was 11. Completely changed the way I thought about poetry and literature. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Benni | 10/8/2012

    " My favorite translation of Ovid's Metamorphoses. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sorcha | 8/5/2012

    " It's finally over. I am doing a dance right now. I had to read this for class, and I enjoyed parts of it and absolutely hated most of it. The most intriguing part is seeing how these stories tie into modern stories. But this has got to be one of the most gruesome books I have ever read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Steve | 7/18/2012

    " Finally, after a long slog. Look at Brooks Otis guide for structure, outline and thematic pointers. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mike | 4/11/2012

    " What a romp through what turned the Roman mind on during the time when Jesus of Nazareth was said to have lived in the Empire. I think Stewart Home may have copied some of Ovid's style of writing revenge scenes and Franz Kafka was surely influenced by the trope of metamorphoses. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Charles | 4/4/2012

    " Erysichthon and Mestra hold a very important place in my mindscape... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jem | 9/19/2011

    " There are myths, and then there are myths. Ovid pulls together a collection of early Roman legends involving unnatural transformations. It's fascinating to see what we usually think of as Greek stories told from a Roman perspective. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sean Garrett | 9/8/2011

    " Publis Ovidius Naso might be my favorite Roman author; and that's some pretty stiff competition right there. 'The Metamorphosis' is his masterpiece. It is an amazing set of stories which take classical myth and transpose them upon the Roman consciousness of his day. A must read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ty | 7/7/2011

    " Must-read for anyone who thinks Shakespeare wrote the original Romero and Juliette. Or who'd like the poetic etymology of echo, narcissism, milky way and so much more. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amylin | 5/19/2011

    " i fell in love with greek mythology when i was 10. almost 10 years later i had to read this book for a greek mythology college course i enrolled in. i was in love. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Liam | 4/8/2011

    " This is my favorite translation, because it read like poetry. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elizabeth | 3/14/2011

    " One of my favorite books. Sort of a hard read if you don't have time to sit down and get through it, but if you can, absolutely rewarding. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Megan | 3/12/2011

    " I liked how there was far less "listing" of every character's lineage and every place they have ever been to which is quite common in Greek mythology I find "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nicole | 2/13/2011

    " This is one of my favorite books especially this translation of it. The way each story weaves in and out of each seamlessly and with purpose is a testament to Ovid's skill. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Iain | 2/11/2011

    " The most beautiful English translation of Ovid I've encountered! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jbdean | 2/11/2011

    " An illuminating trek through the ancient world. Some of Ovid's tales left me spellbound, digging through various texts to grab at the pieces of myth and names of lore. Other tales left me yawning and puzzled at why they were included at all. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carson | 2/3/2011

    " Metamorphoses was very interesting if you're into Greek mythology. It has many stories that help you understand a lot about ancient Greeks and their beliefs. Sometimes a little confusing if you get tested on it because of all the characters, but otherwise it was a great book! "

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About the Author
Author Ovid

Ovid, born Publius Ovidius Naso (43 BC–AD 17/18) was born into a wealthy Roman family and became the most distinguished poet of his time. He died in exile on the Black Sea, far from Rome and his literary life.