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4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (1,195 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: The Dalai Lama, His Holiness the Dalai Lama Narrator: Jeffrey Hopkins Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 2006 ISBN: 9780743563550
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HIS HOLINESS THE DALAI LAMA REVEALS THE KEY TO ACHIEVING HAPPINESS AND A MEANINGFUL LIFE.

In How to See Yourself as You Really Are, the world's foremost Buddhist leader teaches listeners how to recognize and dispel misguided notions of self and embrace the world from a more realistic -- and loving -- perspective.

Step-by-step exercises help listeners shatter their false assumptions and ideas and see the world as it actually exists. His Holiness sets the stage for discovering the reality behind appearances. But getting past one's misconceptions is only a prelude to right action, and the final section describes how to harness the power of meditative concentration to the service of love, and vice versa, so that true altruistic enlightenment is attained. Enlivened by personal anecdotes and intimate accounts of the Dalai Lama's own life experiences, How to See Yourself as You Really Are is an inspirational and empowering guide to achieving self-awareness that can be enjoyed by spiritual seekers of all faiths. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “This latest message from The Dalai Lama reveals his trademark inclusiveness, his thoughtful approach to our diverse worries, and his keen perceptions of when conflict, disharmony, immorality, and commercialism need to be worked through.” 

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nicole | 2/16/2014

    " Dalai Lama the Buddist scholar, explains how the world actually is, simple. This book once more made me realize and see clearly that we live in a superficial society. even thought i didn't understand all the things he explains, I am happy I did read the book and learned to work daily on recognizing and dispelling misguided notions of self caused by media, commercial, peer pressure to have things. I try every day to be my best true self and embrace the world + people in my life more realistic and loving for simple things. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andrew | 2/1/2014

    " Very thought provoking - paradoxically complex in its simplicity - well worth spending time with this book to consider the meaning and value of understanding "dependent arising". "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 James Perkins | 1/31/2014

    " At one point the author appears to have proved you do not exist. However, that would be missing the point. Of course we exist, but we do not exist in the way we think we do. Our perception through physical senses has created an illusion, like a magic act, where the magician appears to have pulled a rabbit out of a hat. It did not really come from the hat, but it appears to have done so. In the same way, we all appear to be separate from each other, but we are not. Nobody exists wholly independently of anything else; we are all here due to some manifestation of thought. He then goes on to describe meditations whereby if you dwell on these concepts, and understand the true nature of reality, it is much easier to exercise compassion and love for your fellow beings, because we are all interrelated. It can be a little heavy-going, and I would not recommend it as the first thing you ever read by this spiritual leader. Still, its teaching was fascinating, and one to ponder. One of the more esoteric works by the Dalai Lama, this is a treatise on the nature of reality, and how everything is not how it seems. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dan | 1/10/2014

    " a somewhat accessible book on one of the trickiest subjects in all of Buddhism: Emptiness. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Paul Mintner | 11/23/2013

    " Religious or not, the Dalai Lama has some pretty great advice words to meditate on; not finished yet, but there's true value in trying to see yourself as the Dalai Lama is able to see himself. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 sheena | 11/22/2013

    " i thought this book would make me feel all warm and inspired. it didn't. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Elly Sands | 11/21/2013

    " This is an important book on Buddhism but a very difficult book to read. The Dalai Lama discusses the three principal characteristics of human existence; impermanence, emptiness and suffering, particularly emptiness. Doesn't sound like fun does it? But these aspects of existence are not as gloomy as they sound. Quite the opposite is true if we understood what they truly are. I do not consider myself a Buddhist but have been attracted to it's philosophy for a long time. I appreciate the Dalai Lama's attempt to convey these principals to the lay person. I could feel his determination and caring to get these thoughts across but I would not recommend this as a first read on Buddhism. But personally,this book took me several steps closer to understanding the nature of human existence. I've a loooooong way to go but it's a fascinating journey. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Raymond Rose | 11/19/2013

    " This is not religion, it is common sense. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Pamela Reynolds | 11/15/2013

    " It was a difficult read but once it began making sense it was extraordinary. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Fred Kohn | 11/7/2013

    " This book is not for the casual reader. OTOH I did find it more understandable than some of the Dalai Lama's more heady stuff. If you are looking for something more introductory to the Dalai Lama's thought, I recommend one of his books on ethics. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kathryn Peterson | 10/12/2013

    " The introduction was the best part. The rest...left me a little unaffected. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Pat | 8/16/2013

    " This is a great book for meditators. There are suggestions at the end of each chapter to use during your meditation. If you are new to Tibetan Buddhism and just beginning to become a regular meditator, this is a great book and guide for you. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christian | 6/11/2013

    " The best book by the Dalai Lama that directly deals with meditation practices. All of his books are wonderful, and extremely diverse, but this one is definitely a handbook for practical application. Highly recommended. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dallas | 5/17/2013

    " Enjoying the meditation for beginners part... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Enah Cruz | 5/17/2013

    " It was very very profound and although I really liked its philosophical wanderings, I was fumbling on ways on how to apply the concepts in a practical manner. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Melody | 5/9/2013

    " As always, anything from the Dalai Lama is educational in my spiritual growth. I grow more and more with every word read! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jesse | 2/13/2013

    " Duh....It's the freakin Dalai Lama! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chris Lemig | 7/1/2012

    " I still don't understand the Buddhist concept of emptiness but H.H. the Dalai Lama explains it more clearly than I've ever read it before. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tomi-Ann | 4/21/2011

    " The only reason I gave this three stars is because I'm sure I didn't understand enough of it to appreciate it fully. It's hard stuff! "Things don't actually exist". That part is not easy for a 45 year old American. But I'm going to keep this book by my bedside and keep trying to digest it in bits. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Fleetwood | 3/10/2011

    " A lot of these books are considered "soft Dharma/Dhamma". There's really no substitution for reading the Buddha's words, but the Dalai Lama is particularly apt at providing a surprisingly common perspective. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Monjamckay | 2/15/2010

    " This book is a bit difficult... it is really about the illusion of form and accepting emptiness. But anyone interested in Buddhism or Quantum Physics will find it interesting "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lisa | 7/26/2008

    " This is a great book and like all the other Dalai Lama's books, this one is full of insight, wisdom, and is thought-provoking. I'll have to read this one again becasue it is not light reading but well worth it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kirk | 3/24/2008

    " The book details an approach to meditation that centers on deriving the self from I. A link between the I and mind body creates disharmony in us which leads to bad things. Very complex, technical information. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Beverly | 3/23/2008

    " He writes well, considering English isn't his native language. I think the problem is that his terminology is too strange for a western audience, and it all sounds like too much work. I've read somewhat the same things from other authors, but more western oriented. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 jamie | 3/9/2008

    " very insightful, helps one see not just ourselves as we really are but life around us as well. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Keith Diehl | 2/1/2007

    " He's a crazy little guy but the mental exercise of keeping up with him can be fun. "

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About the Author

His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso, was born in 1935 to a peasant family in northeastern Tibet and was recognized at the age of two as the reincarnation of his predecessor. As the world’s foremost Buddhist leader, he travels extensively, speaking eloquently in favor of ecumenical understanding, kindness and compassion, respect for the environment, and world peace. He is the author of over seventy books and has received a number of awards, honorary doctorates, and other accolades for his work.

About the Narrator

Jeffrey Hopkins, PhD, served for a decade as the interpreter for the Dalai Lama. A Buddhist scholar and the author of more than thirty-five books and translations, he is emeritus professor of Tibetan and Buddhist studies at the University of Virginia, where he founded the largest academic program of Tibetan Buddhist studies in the West.