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Download How to Expand Love: Widening the Circle of Loving Relationships Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample How to Expand Love: Widening the Circle of Loving Relationships Audiobook, by The Dalai Lama Click for printable size audiobook cover
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (295 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: The Dalai Lama Narrator: Jeffrey Hopkins Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: June 2005 ISBN: 9780743567961
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In How to Expand Love, His Holiness the Dalai Lama, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, offers a simple yet illuminating program for transforming self-centered energy into outwardly directed compassion. Drawing on exercises and techniques established in Tibetan monasteries more than a thousand years ago, the Dalai Lama guides us through seven key stages.
First, we learn ways to move beyond our self-defeating tendency to put others into rigid categories. We discover how to create and maintain a positive attitude toward those around us. By reflecting on the kindness that close friends have shown us we learn to reciprocate and help other people achieve their own long-term goals. And in seeking the well-being of others, we foster compassion, the all-encompassing face of love.
In this accessible and insightful audiobook, His Holiness the Dalai Lama helps us to open our hearts and minds to the experience of unlimited love, transforming every relationship in our lives and guiding us ever closer to wisdom and enlightenment. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “As with all of his writings, How To Expand Love is written in a simple yet elegant style, while imparting profound and powerful teachings that, if committed to, can lead to a realization of our true state of oneness with all of life. This is a very valuable book for today’s fractious times.” 

    Amazon.com, editorial review

  • “Valuable…A generous and sensible road map to not-so-random acts of kindness.” 

    Publishers Weekly

  • “Anything the current Dalai Lama has to say commands attention and interest, and it is difficult to think of another living Tibetan—or indeed any Nobel Peace Prize winner, living or dead—more bold and articulate…Highly recommended.” 

    Library Journal

Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Greg | 2/17/2014

    " Different from his other books. A lot of practical suggested meditations. I was looking for some more concrete information on the subject. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cherie | 2/14/2014

    " B Some of his other books are better but this really aims to teach the reader how to love even their enemies. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kelsey_jane | 2/13/2014

    " It really helps with positive thinking and is a really good book for anyone to read no matter what their beliefs. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Z | 2/10/2014

    " Covers a lot of the things that the Dalai Lama discusses in How to Become Enlightened, and expands on how to develop compassion and a desire to help all sentient beings. The meditation on a mother's love and caring is truly beautiful, and worth reading even for those who have no interest at all in Buddhism... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kate | 1/27/2014

    " What's not to say about this book? Simple guide to living a loving life. I could read his books forever and all day long. So inspiring! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sara | 1/24/2014

    " A work book club read. I wanted to like it...I really did. It just didn't happen for me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lyn | 1/23/2014

    " Very good book, beautifully written. I have read Buddhist texts before and I am always amazed at the accessibility of universal truths and the similarities of lessons between faiths. The desire to be happy and to avoid suffering, and the frequent inability to do either, is contemplated in temples and churches alike. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Charlie | 1/20/2014

    " A bit preachy at times, but definitely has some good bits to chew on. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Hali | 1/19/2014

    " This was a pretty good book & it did have some useful meditations. I thought the reincarnation meditations were a little bit of a stretch for me, but it was interesting to imagine. The Dalai Lama had some excellent points on enemies (practicing patience). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laurie Rasmussen | 12/28/2013

    " Audio Version. This is a book I like to listen to periodically. It serves as a reminder to be a better person. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jami | 12/24/2013

    " fantastic as always. Since trying to find my way back onto the path as a Buddhist this book was just what I needed to really open my eyes to many things that I had been hiding from myself. You really can't go wrong with any of these books, but I found this one esp. meaningful for me as of late. :) "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Melissa | 11/4/2013

    " I found it naive. I really tried to be open and learn from this book but it offers no real spiritual guidance and borders ridicules. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 CJ Ewell | 11/3/2013

    " Read this book and try out some of the exercises. It's tough, but there is truth here "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Virginia | 10/31/2013

    " Imagine your enemy is your mother because at some point in time this person was your mother?... sorry D.L., just can't do that. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Carrie | 10/27/2013

    " I needed this. Reminds me that everyone wants happiness and wants to avoid suffering. We should focus on helping others achieve happiness and avoid suffering. We can help people in the simplest ways. One good idea is to just listen. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mckinley | 10/25/2013

    " More of intro for lay. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 True Weber | 10/13/2013

    " I like the Dalai Lama's books. They are instructive about how to live. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Noe Maldonado | 4/24/2013

    " I learned that Buddhism is quite a bit like all other faiths. The names, places and dates are changed, but the idea is pretty much the same: treat others as you would have them treat you. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lisa | 4/6/2013

    " This is a book I read over and over. It puts things in perspective. We make things much more complicated then they need to be. He simplifies things and helps you see past anger, greed and sadness. I love reading his work. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marjorie Turner | 3/26/2012

    " Another audio-book for the drive. This one had some repetitive parts, but gave lots to consider, and encouraged me to a more loving perspective. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alisha | 7/29/2011

    " I felt really inspired by this book, plus it has very practical meditation tips. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bridget Chapman | 5/6/2011

    " I keep re-reading this one too, and I know it's a cliche, but I get something new from it every time I do. Easy reading but hard thinking. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mohammed | 10/20/2010

    " Such a nice book that enriched my soul with much more love and forgiveness so far. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 James | 5/10/2010

    " It was OK. There were some very good principles which were outlined in an effective way but, overall, the book was way too repetitive. He could have gotten to the point in far fewer pages. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 James | 8/1/2009

    " An enlightened case for altruism. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Monjamckay | 12/5/2008

    " If you are interested in compassion meditations and how to forgive your enemies this is interesting.. but he has better books as an overview of Buddhist ideas "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amy | 11/27/2008

    " Always touching in his writings. You can't go wrong with this book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dawna | 8/9/2008

    " The Dalai Lama's philosophy is simply wonderful. He seems so simplistic, yet he is also speaking simplistically because most of us are not nearly so wise. I become reminded of how adults speak to children and see what he is doing to help us all along. :) "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Candice | 8/4/2007

    " I really like the Dalai Lama's writing but this book was very repetitive and a lot about meditations. I guess I was looking for something else. I liked the basic general message, even though I don't practice Buddism. In all, I thought it was okay. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Glenn | 6/28/2007

    " A lot of the same information as the last Lama book I read. However, the other one was more comprehensive than this one. If you want to read something by the Lama, but want to be eased into it, this would be a better choice than the other one I read. "

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About the Author

His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso, was born in 1935 to a peasant family in northeastern Tibet and was recognized at the age of two as the reincarnation of his predecessor. As the world’s foremost Buddhist leader, he travels extensively, speaking eloquently in favor of ecumenical understanding, kindness and compassion, respect for the environment, and world peace. He is the author of over seventy books and has received a number of awards, honorary doctorates, and other accolades for his work.

About the Narrator

Jeffrey Hopkins, PhD, served for a decade as the interpreter for the Dalai Lama. A Buddhist scholar and the author of more than thirty-five books and translations, he is emeritus professor of Tibetan and Buddhist studies at the University of Virginia, where he founded the largest academic program of Tibetan Buddhist studies in the West.