Extended Audio Sample

Download Five Mark Twain Stories: Featuring 'The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County' Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Five Mark Twain Stories: Featuring The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Mark Twain
0 out of 50 out of 50 out of 50 out of 50 out of 5 0.00 (0 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Mark Twain Narrator: Deaver Brown Publisher: Simply Magazine Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: April 2011 ISBN:
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Here are five of Mark Twain's best short stories, including The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County - classic humor from the author of Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer, and other great American novels.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lorna | 1/26/2011

    " Entertaining as well as much to think about in these stories. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dave | 10/16/2010

    " I wasn't incredibly impressed with the differences between the French/American versions. The story itself was OK. I also enjoyed Twain's historical commentary. For overall enjoyment, I don't think the French re-interpretation added much to the enjoyment or the enlightenment of the story. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jen | 3/3/2010

    " A silly run-on sentence. Creative though. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Marc | 2/14/2010

    " Hilarious. Great slap at the French, too, which is never out of place. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Katie | 6/12/2008

    " Pretty good, but not as funny as I hoped. It would have been better if I read French better. The back-translation is pretty funny, but really just a spoof of French grammar which gets old after a while.

    Now a back-translation of Polish or German grammar, that would be really funny. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Lisa | 3/11/2008

    " Twain is a great writer, but I HATE tall tales and stuff like this. :) That's probably why I was a Brit/Irish Lit. person. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lauren | 10/6/2007

    " I just read the Jumping Frog, but loved it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mary | 8/11/2007

    " All I really want is to go back in time and become Mark Twain's best friend. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 michael spencer | 7/28/2007

    " Worth reading for the quaint descriptions of California life as it was just beginning, this is a great book for settling down to relax with some tea, and still a classic at that. "

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About the Author
Author Mark Twain

Mark Twain, pseudonym of Samuel L. Clemens (1835–1910), was born in Florida, Missouri, and grew up in Hannibal on the west bank of the Mississippi River. He attended school briefly and then at age thirteen became a full-time apprentice to a local printer. When his older brother Orion established the Hannibal Journal, Samuel became a compositor for that paper and then, for a time, an itinerant printer. With a commission to write comic travel letters, he traveled down the Mississippi. Smitten with the riverboat life, he signed on as an apprentice to a steamboat pilot. After 1859, he became a licensed pilot, but two years later the Civil War put an end to the steam-boat traffic.

In 1861, he and his brother traveled to the Nevada Territory where Samuel became a writer for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise, and there, on February 3, 1863, he signed a humorous account with the pseudonym Mark Twain. The name was a river man’s term for water “two fathoms deep” and thus just barely safe for navigation.

In 1870 Twain married and moved with his wife to Hartford, Connecticut. He became a highly successful lecturer in the United States and England, and he continued to write.