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Extended Audio Sample Fathers and Sons Audiobook, by Ivan Turgenev Click for printable size audiobook cover
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (0 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Ivan Turgenev Narrator: Anthony Heald Publisher: Blackstone Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: June 2011 ISBN: 9781470802332
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One of the most controversial Russian novels ever written, Fathers and Sons dramatizes the volcanic social conflicts that divided Russia just before the revolution, pitting peasants against masters, traditionalists against intellectuals, and fathers against sons. It is also a timeless depiction of the ongoing clash between generations.

When a young graduate returns home, he is accompanied—much to his father and uncle’s discomfort—by a strange friend who does not acknowledge any authority and does not accept any principle on faith. Bazarov is a nihilist, representing the new class of youthful radical intelligentsia that would come to overthrow the Russian aristocracy and its values. Uncouth and forthright in his opinions, Turgenev’s hero is nonetheless susceptible to love and, by that fact, doomed to unhappiness.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “Stirs the mind…because everything is permeated with the most complete and most touching sincerity.”

    Dmitri Pisarev, Russian writer and social critic

  • “No fiction writer can be read through with a steadier admiration.”

    Edmund Wilson, American writer

  • “[A novel of] profound vitality.”

    N. N. Strakhov, Russian philosopher and literary critic

  • “Vividly portrays the unsettled state of Russian peasantry before the revolution.”

    Masterpieces of World Literature

  • “The subtlety and rightness of Turgenev’s technique is most clearly seen in the central character Bazarov…a prefiguration of twentieth-century man.”

    Masterpieces of World Literature

  • “The physician Bazarov, the novel’s protagonist, is the most powerful of Turgenev’s creations.”

    Merriam Webster’s Encyclopedia of Literature

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 alana Semuels | 2/12/2014

    " This was written in 19th century Russia, which made me worry that it was going to be turgid and boring when I checked it out of the library on a whim (as an e-book! go lapl!). But it was compelling, funny and sad. It even had essential elements of Russian novels: a duel, a death and unrequited love. Highly recommended for those who want to read a Russian novel that's finishable. The audioversion was quite good. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Erin | 2/5/2014

    " An answer to an unsaid prayer. I needed this book so much at the exact moment I read it. The ending is all encompassing and brings such peace and solace. So written for our times - I swear. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gerald | 1/28/2014

    " I thought this was really pretty, and it softened the insanity Dostoevsky had just brought out in me, and even made me want to avoid him for a while. Turgenev's sincerety is moving; this is the perfect sort of book for a househusband. Arkadii then, was of course my favorite character, and how I envy him! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julie | 1/24/2014

    " This was fast-paced. Characters did not seem to evolve; rather, they shifted. Bazarov's nihilism was not intriguing. But I would give Tugernev another go. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dave Coker | 1/23/2014

    " Terrific read. I think what I love most about this novel along with Tolstoy and Doestyesky (spelling is wrong, I know) is the characters inability to be sure of anything in life, of constant change. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Matt Moment | 1/16/2014

    " Another great piece of Russian lit. Eff you British authors. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Steve | 12/28/2013

    " I read the book in Russian and listened to an excellent audio book with a radio dramatization of the book in Russian. Loved it. Kind of provided some background to the intellectual and social turmoil of 19th century Russia. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Kellee and Courtney | 12/21/2013

    " If there was a meaning it was way over my head. The story was slow and even being translated from russian the vocabulary was higher than mine. I would not recommend this to anyone who does not have a good footing in russian history and sociology. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dan | 10/23/2013

    " One question: in the scene where Fenitchka dances with her one friend (I forget his name), was Turgenev trying to make fun of them? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kricket | 7/26/2013

    " I loved this book, the character of Madame Odintsova in particular. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Huelo | 5/1/2013

    " make sure you find a good translation. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Korneel | 2/26/2013

    " Brilliant book. Typical Russian literature setting, but far more readable than say Dostojevski. Great Story. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nina1982 | 1/30/2013

    " Another gem of the Russian classical tradition.Clash of different ideologies,energies,personalities.The kind and loving man wins in the end, while an energetic and independent dies. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tanyatomkins | 12/24/2012

    " Highly recommend if you haven't read it already. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sigi | 7/6/2012

    " A novel of idleness versus rebellion. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Holly | 4/12/2012

    " Read this back in high school for extra credit, but I LOVED it. Fell in love with Turgenev's writing... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nate | 1/18/2012

    " pretty good book about some dude that is a nihilist and a total dick. much like dostoevsky's demons, its interesting and useful to note that nihilists still act this way. especially when they are german. has a token russian ending "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gregory Rothbard | 1/6/2012

    " Such a great book about life, revolution and change. The prose was so keen as to rise a flame inside, it gave me a window into the time it was written. It also seemed to speak for today. I loved the book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 S. | 8/10/2011

    " completely irrelevant, but this was the book I was reading when the fuckups flew the airplanes into the World Trade Center. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 erik d aker | 6/27/2011

    " A comforting book, possibly because their disputes are so far removed from ours, so quaint. The ending was nice. Also, Turgenev puts his characters together so well that he never has to identify who's talking in dialog. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Caro | 6/19/2011

    " I love the humanity of 19th-century novels. Turgenev's fathers and sons fuss and misunderstand each other, philosophies are exchanged, and we end with two weddings and a tragic death. Great introduction by Alain de Botton in the OUP edition I read. Could have wished for a better translation. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alicia | 6/13/2011

    " I read this as a senior in high school with my English Literature and Composition class. I enjoyed it and the discussions we had. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Victoria | 6/12/2011

    " Snoozed. And I'm a Russian history major. Go figure. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 maitr+margarita | 6/11/2011

    " ??af??eta? ? ?t?st????ßs?? s???? st?? ????????ef ?a? de? ????ta? ?a µ?? d?aß?s?.. ????? ?d?a?te?? p????, ap?? a??st?????µa! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lalove | 5/29/2011

    " I listened to this book on tape, which I liked because I wouldn't have been able to keep track of the Russian names otherwise. I'm still trying to understand all the ideas in this novel, but I really liked it for whatever reason. The characters were really interesting. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Peter Simpson | 5/25/2011

    " Fantastic book. Easily the best 19th century work of literature that I have read. It's about an intense conflict of ideas...the older generation's traditionalist/aristocratic/bourgeois tendencies against the younger generation's nihilist/liberalist yearnings. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bill | 5/17/2011

    " enjoying the superfluous man!
    The ending made me cry.

    This book explores the unrequited love between parents and the children, for me a wow moment. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rissi | 5/11/2011

    " Read this in high school and liked it. My first taste of nihilism and it fascinated me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mircea | 4/15/2011

    " Russians knew their way around writing. And seing the opposition between the traditional views on life of the old generation and the subversive new views of the new generation it's always stimulating. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Korneel | 4/10/2011

    " Brilliant book. Typical Russian literature setting, but far more readable than say Dostojevski. Great Story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Matthew | 4/10/2011

    " The clash between generations, as told through the lens of Russian Nihilism during the 19th century. "

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About the Author
Author Ivan Turgenev

Ivan Sergeyevich Turgenev (1818–1883) was the first Russian writer to gain a wide reputation in Europe. His connections with reform groups in Russia led to his arrest and one-month imprisonment in St. Petersburg. In 1879 the honorary degree of doctor of civil law was conferred upon him by the University of Oxford.

About the Narrator

Anthony Heald, an Audie Award–winning narrator, has earned Tony nominations and an Obie Award for his theater work; appeared in television’s Law & Order, The X-Files, Miami Vice, and Boston Public; and starred as Dr. Frederick Chilton in the 1991 Oscar-winning film The Silence of the Lambs. He lives in Ashland, Oregon, with his family.