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Download Emily Dickinson: Selected Poems Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Emily Dickinson: Selected Poems Audiobook, by Emily Dickinson Click for printable size audiobook cover
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (8,521 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Emily Dickinson Narrator: Mary Woods Publisher: Blackstone Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2012 ISBN: 9781470823757
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Emily Dickinson today has gaining her deserved place alongside Walt Whitman as one of the two greatest American poets of the nineteenth century. Beginning always with particulars of personal experience, her poems encompass life and death, love and longing, joyfulness and sorrow. With sparse, precise language, she conveyed a penetrating vision of the natural world and an acute understanding of the most profound human truths.

The poems included in this collection are grouped by three time periods, 1890, 1891, and 1896, and by the subjects of life, love, nature, and time and eternity.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “No one can read these poems…without perceiving that he is not so much reading as being spoken to.”

    Archibald MacLeish, three-time Pultizer Prize–winning poet

  • “If there were ever a poet whose work begged to be heard, it would be Dickinson.”

    Library Journal

  • “Her poems are remarkable for their condensation, their vividness of image, their delicate or pungent satire and irony, their childlike responsiveness to experience, their subtle feeling for nature…their excellence in imaginative insight and still greater excellence in fancy.”

    Norman Foerster, A History of American Literature

  • “‘I find ecstacy in living,’ she said to Higginson, and spoke truly, as her poems show. In an unexpected light on orchards, in a wistful mood of meadow or wood-border held secure for a moment before it vanished…in the echoes, obscure in origin, that stirred within her own mind and soul, now a tenuous melody, now a deep harmony, a haunting question, or a memorable affirmation—everywhere she displayed something of the mystic’s insight and joy.”

    Cambridge History of American Literature

Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alice | 2/11/2014

    " Love her succinct lines and try to emulate her power by using the "less is more" concept. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joseph | 1/25/2014

    " Emily Dickinson truly softens and expands the heart with her poetry. I love her poems! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Michelle | 1/24/2014

    " Emily is good but not my favorite. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brooke | 1/20/2014

    " I love Emily's poems about life and nature. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jeske | 1/18/2014

    " This was such a pleasant read. Beautiful poetry. I found myself nodding and smiling and occasionally frowning while reading them, and that is a very good sign. I love her honesty and her bold play with words. Just wonderful. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Philip Jenks | 1/17/2014

    " the pocket classic does violence to Dickinson. One can safely say that anyone providing a positive review of this is actively harming poetry with thoughtlessness. This symbolizes what kills writing, and has no resemblance to the author's poems. Shelve it under pulp or "recycle bin." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Steven | 1/17/2014

    " when i keep this book in my back pocket, it looks like i own a wallet. brenda hillman did a fine job of selecting ms. dickinson's poems. this is the most beat-up and worn-out book i own, but i'm still holding out hope it lasts forever. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Allison | 1/9/2014

    " I know I've read a bunch of Emily Dickinson, but probably not everything. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura | 12/26/2013

    " I really enjoyed a lot of these, especially many of those on love. The ones on death are poignant as well but (fortunately) don't relate closely to my life at the moment. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Melissa | 12/18/2013

    " My roommate also gave me this for my birthday. It's a really nice little volume of about 109 poems. Some of her best known poems are included in here, but also others that are just as good, if less studied. It's a cool little book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lynda Peev | 10/26/2013

    " My favourite poetess (and no wonder why). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jude Brigley | 10/25/2013

    " just divine. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Erin | 9/16/2013

    " I really love her poem, "I heard a fly buzz when I died." "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anton Ã…strand | 8/29/2013

    " Great poetry. The use of words and the rhythm is admirable. Definitely recommended. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Irene | 7/27/2013

    " Dickinson's poetry is not easy, but it is often amazing. I saw Julie Harris perform in the Belle of Amhurst and was so enthralled I couldn't stop there. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lesley | 6/3/2013

    " I remember some of the poems from high school and college, but others were new to me. Nice collection. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Aaron | 5/20/2013

    " Brief and beautiful nuggets of wisdom, with a few true greats. It's a tiny volume - read it in an hour or savor it for a few days. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Robin | 4/5/2013

    " The rhyming scheme just doesn't sit well with me. I enjoyed a few poems but kept sing-songing them in my head. Further cementing my theory that I only like free verse. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tamara | 3/2/2013

    " Again, doesn't have to be this edition, but my Dickenson and my Wordsworth sit side by side on my shelf of necessary-to-living books. Her poetry is the most insightful and soul-wrenching use of language, and it moves me deeply. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ellen | 9/11/2012

    " She's kicking my butt. Monastic life style choice, or did she have a choice? What would she have lived in another century, girl that she was? Queen of metaphor. Porous, joyous, imprisoned recluse. She's joyous and she kind of hurts to read.... really good though! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Merna | 9/10/2012

    " I'm a big poetry fan, and Emily simply makes me happy. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jill | 8/4/2012

    " Poetry at its finest! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Katie Baltrush | 5/8/2012

    " With Emily Dickenson, the ultimate introvert manages the ultimate in expression. "

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About the Author
Author Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson (1830–1886) was born in Amherst, Massachusetts. Throughout her life, she seldom left her house, and visitors were scarce. The people with whom she did come in contact, however, had an enormous impact on her thoughts and poetry. By the 1860s, she lived in almost total physical isolation from the outside world but actively maintained many correspondences and read widely. Her poetry reflects her loneliness, and the speakers of her poems generally live in a state of want, but her poems are also marked by the intimate recollection of inspirational moments which are decidedly life-giving and suggest the possibility of happiness. The first volume of her work was published posthumously in 1890 and the last in 1955.

About the Narrator

Mary Woods began her career in Washington, DC, where she performed at Ford’s Theater, the Folger Theater, Round House, and Washington Stage Guild. She spent several seasons at New Playwrights’ Theater developing new American plays. She is a veteran narrator of Talking Books for the Library of Congress, and received the Alexander Scourby Narrator of the Year Award for fiction in 1996. Formerly a radio news director, she now hosts a daily local affairs interview program on Catholic Radio, for the Archdiocese of Santa Fe. She lives in Albuquerque, where she continues to act on stage and in film. She received her BA at the Catholic University of America in Fine Arts and Drama.