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Extended Audio Sample Beyond Good and Evil Audiobook, by Friedrich Nietzsche Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (20,272 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Friedrich Nietzsche Narrator: Steven Crossley Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2011 ISBN: 9781452671642
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Friedrich Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil, first published in 1886, presents a scathing critique of traditional morality and attacks previous philosophers for their blind acceptance of Christian ideals of virtue. As an alternative to what he viewed as the illogical and irrelevant philosophy of the nineteenth century, Nietzsche argues for the importance of imagination, self-assertion, danger, and originality for genuine philosophy. He furthermore denies the existence of a universal system of morality and instead offers a framework in which social roles and power dynamics dictate what is appropriate. A culmination of Nietzsche's mature philosophy, Beyond Good and Evil is a classic of moral thought and one of the foundations of existentialism. This edition is the translation by Helen Zimmern. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gwen Burrow | 2/14/2014

    " If only every philosopher were as wildly interesting as this one. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Danny | 1/31/2014

    " Lots of great ruminations here. He makes you shed your encoding and see things differently. A must for people who think they know everything. Look closer. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Matthewmartinmurray murray | 1/19/2014

    " It was very well written and thought out with distinction. However I find the first part of most philosophy papers to be a little boring where the whole goal is to point out things that are wrong with other prominent philosophers ideas. The middle 3-4 chapters were really good with a lot of short but insightful paragraphs. However the end droned on with a lot of whining about modern Germany and civilization. So I'd like to just condense this book to the middle 3 or so chapters. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Josh Paul | 1/17/2014

    " Quite entertaining, even when he's wrong. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ming | 1/14/2014

    " Probably the coolest book on man in relation to morality and ethics that I have ever read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jacob Stubbs | 1/13/2014

    " My first Nietzsche. Shows the importance of art in expressing the soul. Provides a fascinating critique of Walker Percy's "Lost in the Cosmos" and Tocqueville's "Democracy in America" "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nolan | 1/9/2014

    " It's hard to recommend Nietzsche...he's against democracy, the suffrage of women, mildly racist, etc...but through all the anachronism, he's a phenomenon. Arrogant in all the right ways and some of the wrong ones. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rich Hoffman | 12/21/2013

    " Love him or hate him, Nietzsche hits a nerve with this book. In it he declares that "God is dead." This of course has rattled the cage of many readers which is often the point of literature. This is a wonderfully written book that will rattle your cage, and I love it! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kim Kolaz | 12/7/2013

    " Admittedly *not* my good choice for summer reading. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 amber | 11/29/2013

    " A monumental book for me. Read this in college and discovered how philosophy relates to life. I know, a little late, but better late than never. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Valeriy | 8/15/2013

    " The consolidation of thoughts of Friedrich. It needs to be read only after earlier books, cause it's impossible to understand something or just pass first chapter without this action. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Doina | 7/4/2013

    " i like pretty much anything that questions the dichotomy of binary opposites (i.e. good vs. evil, etc.) good introduction to nietzche, as this book is one of the most approachable of his books. if you like camus and derrida, you will probably enjoy reading this. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eric Roberts | 3/11/2013

    " one of my favorite philosophers "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Stephen | 11/8/2012

    " Friedrich guides us through an enticing philosophical journey where morals and virtues are gradually deconstructed and optimistically rehabilitated. Leaving the reader with a broader view of society and the space in which it inhabits. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Mark | 10/30/2012

    " Beyond insupportable and beneath contempt. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Esteban López | 10/9/2012

    " This book it's like philosophy sculpted on marble; its incredible. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Dustin | 7/26/2012

    " The writing style was a little hard to follow and I got the impression I was missing things. It wasn't awful but I just don't think I was getting out of it what I was supposed to. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anastassiya | 6/24/2012

    " well worth my time. What was it about? I do not recall, he talks and he talks wonderfully about nothing in particular. Some good nuggets. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Otty Medina | 5/10/2012

    " I need to reread this one... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bill Priest | 2/21/2012

    " I credit Nietzsche with helping me enjoy beer more. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Halli Well | 1/31/2012

    " One of the most insightful books ever written. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Brian Woodard | 1/18/2012

    " I would call it a pleasant read, but understanding the thinking is important. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dana Miranda | 1/10/2012

    " the philosopher's task. a philosopher's prejudice. read, but must be read more deeply. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jacob | 5/16/2011

    " My first Nietzsche. Shows the importance of art in expressing the soul. Provides a fascinating critique of Walker Percy's "Lost in the Cosmos" and Tocqueville's "Democracy in America" "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Arnþór Logi | 5/9/2011

    " An eyeopener for me at the time. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Hlöðver | 5/9/2011

    " Long, unaccessible, very tasteless. But he speaks the unconvinent truth about human morality that makes the reader speechless. Throughout this book I either loved Nietzsche or hated him at any given moment. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kate | 4/15/2011

    " I appreciate this great thinker, but he is just too depressing and without hope. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah | 4/15/2011

    " I read this at about 14 and it changed my life forever. I'm not sure you can really get what he's satin without having your life change fundamentally. Beautiful, brilliant, and enthralling. I love this piece. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Matthew | 4/10/2011

    " "Whatever is done out of love is beyond good and evil." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shaun | 2/2/2011

    " Absolutely outstanding read from the godfather of existentialism that provided me with a lot more answers than questions. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cody | 1/23/2011

    " It's been some time since I read this in undergrad, along with several of his other titles, but I do recall being challenged both spiritually and intellectually. I would recommend. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Roseann | 1/23/2011

    " Whew! This was a tough one to slog through. There were many interesting ideas, but I can see why some really hate Nietzsche. At least now I can honestly say I've read something of his, just don't ask me to discuss it closely because I often had to read and re-read passeges. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Steve | 12/1/2010

    " "The falsehood of an opinion is no objection to it." Sorry, but it is.

    Also, I'm alarmed at how few people on goodreads seem actually to understand Nietzsche. "

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About the Author
Author Friedrich Nietzsche

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900) was a nineteenth-century German-born philosopher and classical philologist. He wrote critical texts on religion, morality, contemporary culture, philosophy, and science, using a distinctive German language style. In 1889 he exhibited symptoms of insanity and lived his remaining years in the care of his mother and sister. His ideas exercised a major influence on several prominent European philosophers, including Martin Heidegger, Albert Camus, and Jean-Paul Sartre.

About the Narrator

Steven Crossley, a graduate of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London, has built a career on both sides of the Atlantic as an actor and audiobook narrator, for which he has won twelve AudioFile Earphones Awards and been a nominee for the prestigious Audie Award. He is a member of the internationally renowned theater company Complicite and has appeared in numerous theater, television, film, and radio dramas.