Extended Audio Sample

Download Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future, by Friedrich Nietzsche Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (20,272 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Friedrich Nietzsche Narrator: Stephen Van Doren Publisher: Blackstone Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2010 ISBN: 9781455196074
Regular Price: $16.95 Add to Cart
— or —
FlexPass™ Price: $12.95$5.95$5.95 for new members!
Add to Cart learn more )

This is one of the most important works written by Nietzsche and represents his attempt to sum up his philosophy. The great nineteenth-century philosopher refines his previously expressed ideal of the superman in this work, a fascinating examination of human values and morality. It takes up and expands on the ideas of his previous work, Thus Spoke Zarathustra, but approaches it from a more critical, polemical stance. In nine parts, this book is designed to give listeners a comprehensive idea of Nietzsche’s thought and style.

In Beyond Good and Evil, Friedrich Nietzsche attacks past philosophers for their alleged lack of critical sense and their blind acceptance of Christian premises in their consideration of morality. The work moves into the realm “beyond good and evil” in the sense of leaving behind the traditional morality, which Nietzsche subjects to a destructive critique, in favor of what he regards as an affirmative approach that fearlessly confronts the contextual nature of knowledge and the perilous condition of the modern individual.

Of the four “late-period” writings of Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil most closely resembles the aphoristic style of his middle period. In it he exposes the deficiencies of those usually called “philosophers” and identifies the qualities of the “new philosophers”: imagination, self-assertion, danger, originality, and the “creation of values.” Religion and the master and slave moralities feature prominently as Nietzsche re-evaluates deeply-held humanistic beliefs, portraying even domination, appropriation, and injury to the weak as not universally objectionable.

Download and start listening now!

BK_BLAK_003358

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nathan Cobb | 2/20/2014

    " I am still reading this one. I got a bit stuck on a section where he is just tossing out little one sentence thoughts. I find it very distracting when they use a latin phrase and then immediately follow it with the english translation. I can only hope that this was not how the original text was written. I expect to get back to it but for now... it will gather some dust. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dana | 2/10/2014

    " Sometimes I get bummed out because I feel alone because people don't really seem to see the world the way I do. What's more, I actually start to believe that there is something wrong with ME, because I can't relate well to other people. And then I read this book, or others like it (Lacan) and I realize that this is just the way things go for people like me. I definitely relate to Nietzche's idea of the superior man, and his call for more FREE thinkers, and his condemnation of the common man. He also pointed out some ways in which I wasn't as 'superior' as I ought to be. An excellent read. Highly recommended! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kate Curtis | 2/6/2014

    " I appreciate this great thinker, but he is just too depressing and without hope. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jeremiah | 1/30/2014

    " This is essential reading for anyone interested in philosophy of ethics and the best introduction to Nietzsche. BGaE is an important work as it critically examines the ethical and philosophic systems that preceeded it. Nietzsche's writing is throught provoking and often difficult. Many will not find it convincing as many of his ideas are put forward without support or in a manner of building agreement with the reader. I find Nietzsche's ethics troubling as they seem to come from a position of superiority to the average person and based on a very dim view of humanity in general. One can draw a straight line from Nietzschean ethics to Ayn Rand's cold objectivism and perhaps the Nazis conception of the ubermensch (many have made this connection) A system of ethics needs to be based compassion for humanity, even its ordinary members and in spite of our weaknesses. Tolstoy sees this. Nietzsche does not. Also, I think a philosopher can benefit from some humility and the understanding that there are many ways to be wise. It is the fault of an elitist to conflate lack of education with stupidity. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ned | 1/25/2014

    " again prefer the Walter Kauffman translation "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Yousef | 1/25/2014

    " An easier philosophical text to read. I enjoyed his elucidations of master-slave morality in aphorisms 211-2, and also the shorter, one-sentence aphorisms in the middle of the book that were generally enlightening and astute. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 arg/machine | 1/20/2014

    " This classic of philosophy is in the public domain, with a free electronic copy available here. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Mark | 1/20/2014

    " Beyond insupportable and beneath contempt. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Azam | 1/19/2014

    " I have to say not everything in this book will one agree one but he definitely hits the nail on the head when he mentions the concept of independence and not following a sheep herd mentality. Some of the topics he covers and tackles can quickly become some of your own daily thoughts on situations in life. I felt some what empowered after reading it , knowing that i had some ideologies that matched his. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jacob Stubbs | 1/18/2014

    " My first Nietzsche. Shows the importance of art in expressing the soul. Provides a fascinating critique of Walker Percy's "Lost in the Cosmos" and Tocqueville's "Democracy in America" "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Wavegenerator | 1/17/2014

    " Nietzsche can be puzzling, mainly due to his aphoristic style, but also amazingly lucid. As with all his writings, this is a book of short segments of reflection on various topics, not all of which the reader will agree with, but then at times it's not at all clear whether Nietzsche is being literal, rhetorical, metaphorical, cynical or (typically) some combination of all of those. Definitely worth one's time. Some of the author's interests have become dated due to their removal from us in time, but in principle they still hold tremendous worth. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Agnes | 1/13/2014

    " I have read many philosopheres and have enjoyed them. But I can do not like Mr. Nietsche. I understand he was writing to the elite but his language and tone are not understandable. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Fergus | 1/13/2014

    " dope book, liked this one alot. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Chris Wright | 1/12/2014

    " way too disorganized to be a useful philosophy text. Dude jumps from topic to topic with no discernible order. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Mark | 1/6/2014

    " Beyond insupportable and beneath contempt. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Austin Sims | 1/1/2014

    " Nietzsche has always stirred me to explore new paradigms of thought by toying with presupposed proposition, as he does with the concepts of good and evil quite professionally. Extremely compelling. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Pasquale | 12/2/2013

    " Forse il libro piu' complesso/difficile che abbia mai letto. Non ho capito granche'. Andrebbe riletto. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anastassiya | 11/17/2013

    " well worth my time. What was it about? I do not recall, he talks and he talks wonderfully about nothing in particular. Some good nuggets. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Shaun Marais | 11/15/2013

    " In between various complaints about feminism, philosophy & philosophers and Europe are interesting and valuable insights and ideas. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Slava | 11/3/2013

    " Best book by Nietzsche, imho. Read over and over again. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Josh B. | 10/13/2013

    " Learned some, cross-applied it to everything before, learned everything, became a new person. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anthony | 10/8/2013

    " Thinks highly of himself. A lot of funny one-liners. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Otty Medina | 10/3/2013

    " I need to reread this one... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Maziar | 9/2/2013

    " An aphorist, bitter, and informative intro to Nietzsche's... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Raicheal | 8/10/2013

    " Nietzsche is my very favorite wrestling partner. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Doina | 8/3/2013

    " i like pretty much anything that questions the dichotomy of binary opposites (i.e. good vs. evil, etc.) good introduction to nietzche, as this book is one of the most approachable of his books. if you like camus and derrida, you will probably enjoy reading this. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Eric Davis | 6/20/2013

    " Jim Morrison apparently liked Nietzsche... couldn't get into it "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Lotte | 5/5/2013

    " Perhaps unjustly poor rating, but just could not get through it. Stumped in the first fourth. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Arnþór Logi Arnarson | 5/4/2013

    " An eyeopener for me at the time. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joel | 3/8/2013

    " Often illuminating, occasionally humorous, Beyond Good and Evil is largely a dry and demoralising affair. Nietzsche's analysis of Christianity is powerful, however his blatant sexism and arbitrary condescension of social classes 'below' him are readily discarded. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sara | 2/26/2013

    " I put this book down for a long time once Shakespeare season started up and just finished it last week. A good read for anyone that is interested but if you're looking for something not so dry (as I am) I would recommend Zarathustra. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Halli Well | 10/24/2012

    " One of the most insightful books ever written. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Darkling Plain | 6/21/2012

    " A re-reading from my college days. Still good. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jacob Stubbs | 6/13/2012

    " My first Nietzsche. Shows the importance of art in expressing the soul. Provides a fascinating critique of Walker Percy's "Lost in the Cosmos" and Tocqueville's "Democracy in America" "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 gray vincent | 12/7/2011

    " the best philosophical book ive read "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Slava | 11/25/2011

    " Best book by Nietzsche, imho. Read over and over again. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Yoshin | 7/25/2011

    " A must read for revolutionaries. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Vionwinnie | 7/11/2011

    " this is one of the few books that changed my life. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Erin | 6/3/2011

    " Some books are just weird to rate. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Usuyitik | 5/27/2011

    " one of the most compelling books of nietzsche. a gospel of completely new and revolutionary moral theory. a fascinating writing style. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jacob | 5/16/2011

    " My first Nietzsche. Shows the importance of art in expressing the soul. Provides a fascinating critique of Walker Percy's "Lost in the Cosmos" and Tocqueville's "Democracy in America" "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Arnþór Logi | 5/9/2011

    " An eyeopener for me at the time. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Hlöðver | 5/9/2011

    " Long, unaccessible, very tasteless. But he speaks the unconvinent truth about human morality that makes the reader speechless. Throughout this book I either loved Nietzsche or hated him at any given moment. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kate | 4/15/2011

    " I appreciate this great thinker, but he is just too depressing and without hope. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah | 4/15/2011

    " I read this at about 14 and it changed my life forever. I'm not sure you can really get what he's satin without having your life change fundamentally. Beautiful, brilliant, and enthralling. I love this piece. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Matthew | 4/10/2011

    " "Whatever is done out of love is beyond good and evil." "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Rachel | 3/16/2011

    " To read an author, the best is toread his books. Basic writings? Everyone should choose which are every author's basic writings... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shaun | 2/2/2011

    " Absolutely outstanding read from the godfather of existentialism that provided me with a lot more answers than questions. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cody | 1/23/2011

    " It's been some time since I read this in undergrad, along with several of his other titles, but I do recall being challenged both spiritually and intellectually. I would recommend. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Roseann | 1/23/2011

    " Whew! This was a tough one to slog through. There were many interesting ideas, but I can see why some really hate Nietzsche. At least now I can honestly say I've read something of his, just don't ask me to discuss it closely because I often had to read and re-read passeges. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Steve | 12/1/2010

    " "The falsehood of an opinion is no objection to it." Sorry, but it is.

    Also, I'm alarmed at how few people on goodreads seem actually to understand Nietzsche. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Stephen | 11/11/2010

    " I'm reading/enjoying every second of this book "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Drew | 1/19/2010

    " Loved this when I studied it back in college (political theory); I'll have to go back and re-read as I feel like I've forgotten a lot of what I used to know. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Billy | 9/22/2009

    " a very good collection of selected nietzsche main works. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Olivia | 9/9/2009

    " Good stuff. Still go back to it once in a while. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dianne | 7/21/2009

    " Aside from the prose style, what's not to like? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Scott | 4/27/2009

    " We only read half of the text for 'The Birth of Tragedy' in class. I'd like to finish it, but my impressions so far are not too dissimilar from Nietzsche's own opinion of his work in that it's sloppy, confusing, bloated, and mostly directionless. Not his words exactly... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Danny | 3/19/2009

    " one of those books i keep coming back to. "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations