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Download A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man Audiobook, by James Joyce
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (55,329 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: James Joyce Narrator: Cyril Cusack Publisher: Saland Publishing Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: November 2011 ISBN:
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Cyril Cusack reads a selection from Joyce's semi-autobiographical novel. Stephen Dedalus is a young man growing up in Ireland in the early part of the 20th century. His search for knowledge and undestanding, and the decline of his family's circumstances, lead him to revelations on the nature of art and politics.

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kimi | 2/16/2014

    " Karena saya bacanya diselingi membaca buku yang lain dan terlalu banyak istirahatnya, jadi saya tidak terlalu ngeh dengan ceritanya. Bahkan, saya cenderung lupa. Hahaha... Tapi, temanya bagus dah. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Joseph | 2/15/2014

    " Doesn't really do anything for me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bryan | 2/6/2014

    " I read this to get a taste of what reading Ulysses would be like (in my opinion the Mount Everest of literary novels). This book did not make me want to climb anytime soon. A lot smarter people than me have sung the praises of it, but I just didn't enjoy it as much as other literary novels I've read. It just didn't resonate with me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lark | 1/24/2014

    " Finished it. Now give me a week to stew in it and I'll try to write a review. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sarah | 1/23/2014

    " My feelings about this book are not unlike my feelings about Catcher in the Rye--I appreciated it, I thought it was good, but I didn't relate to the character much. While there were a lot of interesting things about the story from an objective or historical standpoint and from a craft perspective, Stephen Dedalus's struggles were not something that I personally could connect with. I didn't have a Catholic upbringing, for one thing. His ongoing effort to find his own artistic voice was the theme that I most related to, but it was so fraught with religious, cultural and gender-related baggage that it felt particular to the character rather than general, if that makes sense. After doing some research on the background of the book, I found the cultural and linguistic nuances pretty interesting--e.g., the juxtaposition of Irish traditional culture (or, rather, Joyce's portrayal of it) vs. the intellectual, English-influenced educational system. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sean | 1/19/2014

    " There was a sizable handful of moments when reading this book simply put me in awe: of a gorgeous phrase, of the depth and clarity of a thought or experience, or of the way that I'd occasionally relate to Stephen Dedalus at as deep a level as perhaps any other character I've encountered, real or fictional, only to feel challenged by other ways in which he's so different from me or even impenetrable. This being James Joyce, I was of course also by turns puzzled, perplexed, and even maddened by both the content and structure of the novel. In a way similar to Ulysses -- not to the epic extent, but for its size -- this book induces in me a complex reaction, and raises the bar on what I can expect from or get out of literature. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jean Bond | 1/17/2014

    " There's a reason this is considered one of the best books in the English language. A thoughtful book dealing with internal life and development. Unusual prose style (even for its time, I believe), and a bit of a slow, heavy read, but worth the effort. I feel that I would really need to re-read it to get the most of it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mohsen Qassemi | 1/17/2014

    " I have to read it again. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Adrienne | 1/16/2014

    " There are so many gems of evolving perspective hidden away in this book. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Marti | 1/12/2014

    " I hated this book so much. Joyce describes his own art at one point, maybe inadvertently, when he says that true beauty shouldn't inspire desire or loathing. Judging by the 1 star reviews and the 5 stars, this work definitely inspires both. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Randy Elrod | 12/28/2013

    " A must read for creatives and dreamers... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jennifer | 12/18/2013

    " Okay, so I haven't read enough Joyce to judge, but there's a lot of be said about the themes jam-packed into this tome. Religion, language, water and hot and cold, sex, father, fat - I love how each section adopts a different sort of tone, abbreviating the different stages in Stephen's growth. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gretchen | 11/24/2013

    " Sometimes prose is plain lovely...like here. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kirsten | 11/20/2013

    " Well, definitely an easier read than Ulysses - at least there seemed to be a story to this one. So...I guess I liked it alright. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Harrison | 10/31/2013

    " the third chapter got tiresome really fast "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Anita Williamson | 10/16/2013

    " I read it because it is a classic not because I enjoyed it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jasetyn | 8/14/2013

    " He's an excellent writer but I just wasn't invested in the book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rosemary | 5/4/2013

    " Difficult to read at first, but as with so many older "classics" you do pick up the rhythm as you continue reading. It does get tedious going to the notes section to understand some of the outdated terms and language, but overall I enjoyed it. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 J.E. | 1/20/2013

    " It put me off of books for a month. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Aileen | 10/1/2012

    " i didn't get much out of this writing or style of writing, even though I found it interesting at times "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jo-elle | 4/3/2012

    " I have read this book several times over my life, usually when I'm at a cross roads or period of transition. I find something new in it every time. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Geeta | 3/9/2012

    " traces the development of mind and the conscience of the artist "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Meghan Moloney | 3/1/2012

    " I tried... I really did. But someday I will have to attempt to reread this and make some sort of sense out of it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Katie Comfort | 2/7/2012

    " Had to read this for Irish Literature class in college...found it a bore. Only liked the descriptions of some of the buildings. I don't even remember finishing it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Stephanie | 12/7/2011

    " SOOOOO difficult to read. Great book once you get the hang of it "

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About the Author
Author James Joyce

James Joyce (1882–1941) was an Irish expatriate writer, widely considered to be one of the most influential writers of the twentieth century. He is best known for his landmark novel Ulysses and its highly controversial successor Finnegans Wake, as well as the short-story collection Dubliners and the semi-autobiographical novel A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.