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Download A Passage To India Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample A Passage To India Audiobook, by E. M. Forster
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (25,664 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: E. M. Forster Narrator: Meera Syal Publisher: CSA Word Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: November 2008 ISBN:
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Adela Quested travels to India with her chaperone Mrs Moore, on the premise of deciding whether to marry Mrs Moore's son Ronny Heaslop, the city magistrate. Finding her India very disappointingly English, Adela jumps at the chance the two women are given to travel to the distant Marabar caves with Aziz, a charismatic young Indian Doctor.

When Adela is subjected to an attempted assault in one of the caves, Dr. Aziz is arrested and tried in court. The volatile situation forces British India's cracks to widen into chasms, although bridges of hope are found in some open-minded British characters like the logical college principal Mr. Fielding.

Forster's eloquent and mature prose style makes this unique and sensitive audio version of the classic story a moving and philosophical experience. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Alison | 2/20/2014

    " I only read a few chapters in before I was thinking about other things. The story just didn't hook me at this point in my life...I'll try again someday. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jay | 2/17/2014

    " Before this book, I had read little from the time when India was under British rule. I really liked the primary conflict in the story, even if it took a long time to get there, and the details of that time period and location. The book starts really slow, but it's definitely worth reading. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ann | 2/5/2014

    " Most good novels are terrible guides for how to live, but once again, my overpowering feeling from how Forster's novels are written - even more than what happens within them - is that if all humans handled each other with such undismayed honesty and tender clarity, the world would be a far better place. That A Passage to India also features as decent, relevant, and accurate depiction of the complexities of India, empire, and expatriatism as you're liable to find -- that's just gravy, baby. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Christina | 1/25/2014

    " I had trouble getting through it, but it mostly redeemed itself by about page 150. It took me weeks to get through the first half, and a day to finish. I think I don't particularly like his prose- overly detailed; it felt oppressive. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andrew | 1/23/2014

    " really good insight into anglo-indian culture in the early 20th century. well written, beautiful descriptions of the asian sub-continental scenes "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bob | 1/23/2014

    " Readers who passed (no pun) over this Forster title for others that are more popular should reconsider. More than a personal favorite, I would place it with "classics" everyone should read. Do Moby and Will, read the notes on Marx, pick a Steinbeck, pick a Dickens, pick a Hemingway, but make this your E.M. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ramona | 1/18/2014

    " Funny, sad, disturbing, exotic and at the same time close to home. This book presents you with many questions and no definite answers. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Kristine | 1/17/2014

    " Dull as a spoon. Contrived characterizations, stilted dialogue. Don't waste your time. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Benita | 1/2/2014

    " Didn't enjoy it as much as Room with a View but I still hit the vermouth and ate mangos! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Charlotte | 1/2/2014

    " Gave up!! Didn't enjoy it at all.... I found it really hard to read and I didn't understand who everyone was and what was going on because there is no explanations for rankings within society and etiquette so it makes the story hard to follow... in my opinion :( Gutted I gave up but there you go.... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kristin Hochmuth | 10/18/2013

    " Incredible! Exemplifies not only what Forster does best but, in taking on the complexities of race relations and cultures demonstrates no little literary alacrity and a healing, passionate warmth for those who attempt to cross their borders. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Katie | 9/22/2013

    " Wow what writing. I do wish I had wiki'ed more of the Indian terms...but an enveloping read. Reminded me a lot of Room With a View, naturally. I really liked how the plot and characters peeled out slowly, and characters you thought might be important really weren't, and vice versa. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Wendy | 7/2/2013

    " This was my book group read for December I was the only one of our group that enjoyed it. It was a little slow at the beginning but once I got into I didn't want to put it down so much so that I bought a copy for my kindle as I had to return the book group copy before I had finished. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 mike | 8/17/2012

    " Made me loathe ex-pat British (again). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Molly | 7/11/2012

    " Read for a college Religion & Literature class. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gash | 1/25/2012

    " Really enjoyed this book. I've loved the films of forster's books but this is my first attempt at reading one. I've always wanted to visit India and Forsyer's descriptions are great. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Karen | 9/28/2011

    " I am not much of a one for classics - this one was no different. Respecitng it for the time and place it is written is the key to appreciating the work. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Deanna | 5/20/2011

    " I don't think I'm smart enough for this. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Robert Partridge | 5/20/2011

    " Some fine writing but an oddly structured book, and the central focus or point of view shifts frequently. It has much to say about colonialism but as Forster himself was aware, events overtook his book even as he was writing it. Worth reading. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ashley | 5/14/2011

    " ... What can I say, I enjoyed it. Not as much as Maurice (it is a completely different type of novel), but I liked it none the less. Somehow, Forster managed to capture the ...vastness and unknown that is often associated with India/the Orient ... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alberto | 5/11/2011

    " Time Magazine said "What he demonstrates here, in a story of the greatest and saddest subtleties — and comic subtleties, too — is how nearly impossible that is to do." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Charlie | 5/6/2011

    " An insightful depiction of Anglo-Indian relations during British rule of India. A sumptuous and enduring classic. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bonnie | 5/1/2011

    " the race relations in this book make me feel icky.
    i've been able to see what's coming for PAGES and the characters are frustratingly naive... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Randa | 5/1/2011

    " one of my best novel to forster but still i like his essay What i belive the most "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Christina | 4/27/2011

    " I had trouble getting through it, but it mostly redeemed itself by about page 150. It took me weeks to get through the first half, and a day to finish. I think I don't particularly like his prose- overly detailed; it felt oppressive. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Christian | 4/21/2011

    " I don't recall much of what I read, though I just watched the film version and liked it very much. Maybe I should try it again, now that I've spent a little time in India... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Pattersonjh | 4/14/2011

    " Fantastic. Heavy, breath taking prose. "

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About the Author

Edward Morgan Forster (1879–1970) was born in London and raised by his mother and paternal aunts. He pursued his interests in philosophy and classics at Cambridge and there began his writing. He wrote six novels, short stories, essays, and other nonfiction. He is known for his liberal humanism, notably exemplified in his greatest novel, A Passage to India.