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4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (3,112 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Ernest Hemingway Narrator: James Naughton Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: June 2006 ISBN: 9780743565141
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"If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast."

-- ERNEST HEMINGWAY TO A FRIEND, 1950

Published posthumously in 1964, A Moveable Feast remains one of Ernest Hemingway's most beloved works. It is his classic memoir of Paris in the 1920s, filled with irreverent portraits of other expatriate luminaries such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein; tender memories of his first wife, Hadley; and insightful recollections of his own early experiments with his craft. It is a literary feast, brilliantly evoking the exuberant mood of Paris after World War I and the youthful spirit, unbridled creativity, and unquenchable enthusiasm that Hemingway himself epitomized.

Ernest Hemingway did more to change the style of English prose than any other writer in the twentieth century, and for his efforts he was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1954. Hemingway wrote in short, declarative sentences and was known for his tough, terse prose. Publication of The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms immediately established Ernest Hemingway as one of the greatest literary lights of the twentieth century. As part of the expatriate community in 1920s Paris, the former journalist and World War I ambulance driver began a career that lead to international fame. Hemingway was an aficionado of bullfighting and big-game hunting, and his main protagonists were always men and women of courage and conviction, who suffered unseen scars, both physical and emotional. He covered the Spanish Civil War, portraying it in fiction in his brilliant novel For Whom the Bell Tolls, and he subsequently covered World War II. His classic novella The Old Man and the Sea won the Pulitzer Prize in 1953. He died in 1961. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “Gives us an opportunity to meet Hemingway less as the controlled craftsman that he long pretended to be than as the embittered, frightened, sharp-eyed avoider of feelings who captured them unerringly…[an] elegiac testimony of a writer sensitive to time and change, to false starts and to false people, most especially himself.” 

    Wall Street Journal

  • “Each chapter is short and vignette-like, comical, bitchy and warm. They are best read a few at a time, so as to get into the flow of Hemingway’s surprising sentences, but not to be overwhelmed by the high concentration of egos gathered together on one page.” 

    Observer (London)

  • “It is a short, perfect book. Hemingway wrote it when he was a successful man, about the experience of being a young man, who was not yet successful, but who was writing and happy and in love with his wife. It is very personal but in the most generous way.” 

    Independent (London)

  • A #1 New York Times bestseller

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jill | 2/17/2014

    " This book has been on my to read list for a long time but I am glad I waited for the restored edition. I also think I appreciated this more because of reading "The Paris Wife" about Hemingway's time in Paris with his wife, Hadley. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Pat | 2/17/2014

    " completed the trilogy - movie Midnight in Paris then Paris Wife...so had to finally read the real thing! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michael | 2/15/2014

    " I really liked this book. Fun sketches from his time in Paris in the 1920s, which include anecdotes involving some other prominent literary figures in Hemingway's social circles (Gertrude Stein, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ezra Pound). A must-read for Paris travelers who want to get a feel for the city and its English-speaking cultural history. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jennifer | 2/10/2014

    " I really admire Hemingway's ability to tell it how it is without giving us pages of description. The stories come across as more real, more true to life even though they took place almost a century ago. Much of what was true then is true now, especially when it comes down to the character of a person. I don't think that the additions to the end of this particular version are of any special worth other than to show he was a writer dedicated to perfecting his craft- don't we know this already? I also think that, had I not known of some of the characters and the general life of Hemingway in Paris, this would have been confusing. It means more knowing the background of his story, whether its fictionalised or not. That said, I enjoyed the book thoroughly and enjoyed the view of 1920's Paris it provided me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bayneeta | 2/7/2014

    " Can't see any reason to mess with the original version. Perhaps a curiosity for fans; if you're only going to read one, stick with the original. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gabrielle | 2/5/2014

    " I enjoyed it so much more than o thought possible. I enjoyed his caricatures of friends and acquaintances, his romantic eye towards Paris, his description of writing and working as a writer. He did not disappoint in Hemingway-can't/won't-write-women. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tinuviel | 2/4/2014

    " The more I read about Hemingway, the more fascinated I become. I suppose that's one thing I can thank the Paris wife for. Was difficult for me to get into at first as I am not used to his style of writing. But I admire him for the simplicity of his prose, which in no way diminished his works. Paris in the 1920's, Fitzgerald, Ezra Pound. These are just some of the reasons to read A Moveable feast. Somehow feels like you can almost know the great writers of that time just by reading this "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Greg | 1/24/2014

    " A great description of 1920s Paris by the great Hemingway. Paris comes to live in this book through Hemingway's unique style of simplicity and wit, involving the meeting of many familiar personages including Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound, Ford Madox Ford, and the great Fitzgerald. I enjoyed this book very much, being the fourth Hemingway novel I've read this year. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeff | 1/24/2014

    " One of my favorite Hemmingway's "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dianna | 1/23/2014

    " Awesome insight into the man. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Pam Bennett | 1/18/2014

    " enjoyed this much more after reading the Paris Wife, and got a true sense of Ernest. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeff | 1/16/2014

    " Why didn't I read this before traveling to Paris? Guess I will have to go back.... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ldmarsha | 1/12/2014

    " Surprised by how much I enjoyed this. I've always been lukewarm to Hemingway. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elizabeth | 12/27/2013

    " Not my favorite Hemingway, but a fantastic companion to "The Paris Wife." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Moni Smith | 12/20/2013

    " That was really, really good. I need to read more Hemingway. I am also now completely fascinated by Zelda Fitzgerald. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 LaVonne Powell | 12/14/2013

    " Excellent. You will want to watch "Midnight in Paris" again after reading it. Restored version is better because the positive Hadley parts that were edited out by Mary Hemingway are restored. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Linda | 12/14/2013

    " I liked finding the common links between this book and A Paris Wife. Enjoyed Paris Wife much more. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rachel | 12/14/2013

    " After reading The Paris Wife, I was very excited to re-read this book. I enjoyed it in college, but really loved it the second time around. Touching and endearing, it's a great collection of small stories that depict Hemingway's life as an ex-pat in Paris after WWI. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kathy Maxey | 12/11/2013

    " Enjoyed the descriptions of life in Paris during this golden age. Reading about Hemingway's relationship with his wife, the Fitzgeralds, Gertrude Stein, etc. The book made me curious about his wife, Hadley Richardson, wanting to read about her side of the story. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 KatieSuzanne | 12/8/2013

    " I've always wanted to love Hemingway's writing but just found it good and not great. This book was great. Beyond great. I loved every word of it. I plan to get a good copy of it for my bookshelf so I can read from it randomly whenever I want. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Libby Nousen | 11/30/2013

    " I enjoyed this more than I expected. I'm not the biggest Hemingway fan, but I did appreciate getting to see the behind the scenes of his writing that this book portrayed. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michelle Prendergast Sweeney | 11/27/2013

    " I recommend this edition; it contains sections that do not appear in the original publication, in large part due to his fourth wife's personal inclinations. The editors -- his grandsons -- have included also some fragments of interest. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 J. Morgan | 11/15/2013

    " Ah, Hemingway. Proof that good writing doesn't have to be pompous. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jill Propst | 11/7/2013

    " There were parts of this book that I really enjoyed, and there were parts of it that made absolutely no sense to me at all. On balance, though, I liked it more than I disliked it. The parts about F. Scott Fitzgerald were entertaining enough to make the entire book worthwhile. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Amy | 6/22/2013

    " A decent read - though anyone reading this without knowing much about Hemingway in Paris may not enjoy the disjointed essays. Having just read "The Paris Wife", most of the essays were referring to things that were familiar to me...thankfully. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cynthia | 6/14/2013

    " Felt the burning need to read this again after completing "The Paris Wife." Essential reading! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cece | 3/12/2013

    " Vignettes, not a cohesive narrative. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tori | 2/15/2013

    " interesting new edition... prefer the original but still a good read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Pam Bennett | 12/9/2012

    " enjoyed this much more after reading the Paris Wife, and got a true sense of Ernest. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marla Glenn | 11/29/2012

    " I think my biggest take-away from this memoir is that I need to read Ezra Pound. He was so highly thought of, apparently. Hemingway is an excellent reporter; he probably should have done more of this and less of the ficion. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Marcy Heller | 11/10/2012

    " The portraits of Paris in the 20s ring very true, but Hemingway's megalomania and nasty portrayals of anyone but himself reminds one what a cad Hemingway really was. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mark Flores | 10/24/2012

    " This book taught me many things about writing, about friendships, about love and about life. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Adam | 9/7/2012

    " I only wish it was longer. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gabriele Wills | 6/24/2012

    " This "restored' edition is a fascinating account of Hemingway's life in Paris in the 1920s, as much for what it doesn't reveal as for what he chose to focus on. It would be interesting to know why a seemingly happy and deeply loving relationship with his first wife ended in an affair and divorce. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cindy Lofgren | 6/14/2012

    " I'm glad to have read the restored edition because it gave a truer sense of what Hemingway was going through at the time. Sometimes, I will admit, his writing style gives me a headache but at the same time he put you so IN to the scene that you have to keep going. Recommended read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Danette | 1/30/2012

    " I enjoyed the readalong on Wallace's Unputdownables blog, especially after reading The Paris Wife. Hemingway is certainly not a lovable character, but it was interesting to read his recollection of this time in his life. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Michelle | 11/18/2011

    " I only read about 1/3 of the book... So my rating really doesn't mean anything. It was just too slow for me. Maybe I will pick it up again sometime in the future. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 andy orin | 6/18/2011

    " Yes. One of my favorite things. Bystanders will be happy with the old paperback, but it's nice to see the unedited bits. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joshua Mckee | 6/17/2011

    " One of my new favorites. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Allison | 5/16/2011

    " Love love love. Restored edition pretty interesting. Read appendixes which has some new stories. Great one about Mr. bumpy. And expanded Pilot Fish and the Rich which is heartbreaking and wonderful. A must companion to The Paris Wife. Sun Also Rises too. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Angela | 5/16/2011

    " As it grew more and more depressing, the better it got! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Helena | 5/15/2011

    " Hemingway's memoir of his time in Paris with his first wife, Hadely Richardson. I enjoyed this more than his novels. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 andy | 5/13/2011

    " Yes. One of my favorite things. Bystanders will be happy with the old paperback, but it's nice to see the unedited bits. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ann | 5/11/2011

    " Good book to read with The Paris Wife....his wife Hadley's side of the story...especially if you're looking for interesting walks to take in Paris. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 5/8/2011

    " Re-reading Hemingway, always find something new to admire! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joan | 5/8/2011

    " Interesting read after The Paris Wife- he really didn't view the end of his marriage as a big deal. It gets about two sentences!! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 5/5/2011

    " Here's my Hemingway-esque review:

    A Moveable Feast is a fine book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Diane | 5/3/2011

    " Read this as a companion book to A Paris Wife. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rma | 4/30/2011

    " a great book but edited by his last wife so it may not be as complete as Hemingway would have liked. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Frank | 4/29/2011

    " Hemingway - Paris - writers - writing - and even skiing (not is Paris). It is a series of linked, short narratives. "

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About the Author
Author Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway (1899–1961), born in Oak Park, Illinois, started his career as a writer in a newspaper office in Kansas City at the age of seventeen. After the United States entered the First World War, he joined a volunteer ambulance unit in the Italian army. After his return to the United States, he became a reporter for Canadian and American newspapers. During the twenties, Hemingway became a member of the group of expatriate Americans in Paris, which he described in his first important work, The Sun Also Rises. He also wrote Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and The Old Man and the Sea, the story of an old fisherman’s journey, his long and lonely struggle with a fish and the sea, and his victory in defeat. He also wrote short stories that are collected in Men Without Women and The Fifth Column and the First Forty-Nine Stories. Hemingway died in Idaho in 1961.

About the Narrator

James Naughton is an actor and director. He first came to prominence in the television series adaptation of the Planet of the Apes movie series of the same name. Since then, he has starred in dozens television shows and appeared in numerous Broadway plays. He is a two-time Tony Award winner, one for his performance as Sam Spade in City of Angels and the other portraying Billy Flynn in the 1997 revival of Chicago.