Extended Audio Sample

Download A Double-Barreled Detective Story Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample A Double-Barreled Detective Story (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Mark Twain
2.75 out of 52.75 out of 52.75 out of 52.75 out of 52.75 out of 5 2.75 (8 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Mark Twain Narrator: Thomas Becker Publisher: Commuter's Library Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 1999 ISBN:
Coming Soon! We're adding audiobooks daily and hope to make this one available for download very soon. Submit your vote below to let us know you really crave this title!
Vote this up! This audiobook has 0 votes

Mark Twain is at his irreverent best with this hilarious parody of the 19th-century mystery. The tale begins with the murder of Flint Buckner and a heinous crime against a young woman. A man with special gifts - no less a personage than Sherlock Holmes! - enters the scene to solve the mystery and avenge the lady. He matches wits with an improbable villain, Archy Stillman, while Ham Sandwich and Wells Fargo look on, and almost gets himself lynched in the process. Download and start listening now!

BK_COMM_000011

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ellen | 2/12/2013

    " This is Twain's spoof of Sherlock Holmes, set in the mining country of the West. Funny, but not his best work. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Roxane | 9/4/2012

    " Doers of dastardly deeds get their just deserts... "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jeanette Johnson | 10/28/2011

    " Have you ever had a dream that encompasses snatches of a nightmare and then morphs into a pseudo-reality that leaves you confused, even after waking? That's what reading this book is like. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ed | 6/14/2011

    " A strange story of a famous British detective getting his comeuppance in the wild west by a boy with super-smell. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Laura | 4/18/2011

    " I have to admit that Mark Twain is brilliant in his criticisms of himself and others. However this story was quite unrealistic (Archy's tracking abilities) and although Twain was merely parodying Sherlock Holmes, I am highly offended that he could even suggest that Holmes ever stammered! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amy | 2/6/2011

    " Read "The Double-Barreled Detective Story" and thought it was an interesting addition to Twain's satirical style. Mocking Doyle was hilarious. The story was funny, overall, too. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Deepti | 7/23/2010

    " I found this book quite confusing or may be I don't have the right kind of sense of humor to appreciate it. Also, being an ardent fan of Sherlock Holmes, I couldn't appreciate him being described as a fraud. A quick read nevertheless. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Laura | 3/10/2010

    " I have to admit that Mark Twain is brilliant in his criticisms of himself and others. However this story was quite unrealistic (Archy's tracking abilities) and although Twain was merely parodying Sherlock Holmes, I am highly offended at his suggestion that Holmes ever stammered! "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author
Author Mark Twain

Mark Twain, pseudonym of Samuel L. Clemens (1835–1910), was born in Florida, Missouri, and grew up in Hannibal on the west bank of the Mississippi River. He attended school briefly and then at age thirteen became a full-time apprentice to a local printer. When his older brother Orion established the Hannibal Journal, Samuel became a compositor for that paper and then, for a time, an itinerant printer. With a commission to write comic travel letters, he traveled down the Mississippi. Smitten with the riverboat life, he signed on as an apprentice to a steamboat pilot. After 1859, he became a licensed pilot, but two years later the Civil War put an end to the steam-boat traffic.

In 1861, he and his brother traveled to the Nevada Territory where Samuel became a writer for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise, and there, on February 3, 1863, he signed a humorous account with the pseudonym Mark Twain. The name was a river man’s term for water “two fathoms deep” and thus just barely safe for navigation.

In 1870 Twain married and moved with his wife to Hartford, Connecticut. He became a highly successful lecturer in the United States and England, and he continued to write.