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Download A Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample A Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America Audiobook, by Ronald Takaki Click for printable size audiobook cover
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (1,158 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Ronald Takaki Narrator: Peter Berkrot Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2011 ISBN: 9781452671550
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Upon its first publication, A Different Mirror was hailed by critics and academics everywhere as a dramatic new retelling of our nation's past. Beginning with the colonization of the New World, it recounts the history of America in the voice of the non-Anglo peoples of the United States-Native Americans, African Americans, Jews, Irish Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, and others-groups who helped create this country's rich mosaic culture. From the role of black soldiers in preserving the Union to the history of Chinese Americans from 1900 to 1941, from an investigation into the issue of "illegal" immigrants from Mexico to a look at the sudden visibility of Muslim refugees from Afghanistan, Takaki's work is a remarkable achievement that grapples with the raw truth of American history and examines the ultimate question of what it means to be an American. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “Students will find this overview to be an accessible, cogent jumping-off place for American history and political science assignments.”

    School Library Journal

  • A valuable survey of the American experience of several racial and ethnic minorities: readable popular history in the mode of Takaki's Strangers from a Different Shore. Kirkus

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mike | 2/4/2014

    " A fascinating look at different periods in US history from a multicultural perspective. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amorette | 1/28/2014

    " Takaki is amazing. Excellent book covering the history and many experiences of immigrant groups migrating to America - stories often not told in American History books and courses. I am so fortunate to have gotten an autographed copy before he passed away. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Katrine | 1/26/2014

    " While travelling to a conference on multiculturalism, Ronald Takaki, whose ancestors came to America more than 100 years ago, is complimented on his English by his taxi-driver, and asked where he "comes from". This anecdote is the perfect starting point for Takaki's book, which aims to show how American society has come to accept certain ethnic groups as more American than others. It is a fascinating history of the United States, not really alternative, but as the title indicates, different. After all, Takaki does not try to re-write history. He merely presents what is generally overlooked; the histories of all other ethnic groups than white Europeans. American history is usually presented from a European-settler prespective; with other groups being mentioned more in passing, as thought they were a footnote in history. This, as Takaki shows, is obviously not the case. The book is not without it's flaws. It can tend to be preachy and overly subjective at times, but not intrusively so. Takaki also has a like of literary references and allusions that can seem rather misplaced in some cases. Overall though, this is an important, and nessecary book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lainey | 1/10/2014

    " ...all the American history I only heard snippets of in school. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Hillary Hunt | 1/9/2014

    " Read this in college, and it's been a while. It was a very academic read. But I remember that it gave me a new perspective on the idea that America was this mecca for religious freedom and tolerance. That was the idea, but we were definitely still a work in a progress. The protection and safety of the working class, and the rights of any minority group were things that had to be fought for, often at the expense of lives. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elizabeth | 12/25/2013

    " I am not much into history but Takaki managed to pique my interest with 'A Different Mirror'. If you are looking to get a more accurate depiction of American history, not that BS elementary & high school teachers wanted you to think was accurate, I highly recommend Takaki's book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lyannimal | 12/21/2013

    " i personally hate history books. this one though, i actually found parts of it interesting. there are different chapters, ea. with a different story, with a more spiced up school textbook tone. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rinda Rinda | 12/17/2013

    " I would love to see this book incorporated in to our high school history curriculums. Takaki brings centerstage the history of minorities in the US which has often been left out of our history books. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jessica | 12/15/2013

    " A classic in Ethnic Studies. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Karen | 11/25/2013

    " I had to read this for my Diversity and Social Diversity class. I was surprised by how much I liked it and how it made me see things a different way. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chii Muni | 11/22/2013

    " GREAT book about the history of America and how it was built. Good book to use as supplemental social studies text. Gives an alternate point-of-view of American history. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Daniela | 10/25/2013

    " Similar to Zinns "Peoples History", except with a slightly different focus. Very interesting and informative. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Chris Maguire | 10/4/2013

    " Pretty good group of stories about marginalized ethnic groups in the US. Somewhat dry, read it for English 205 "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jim | 9/23/2013

    " Good revisionist U.S. history. Focuses on the experiences of Mexican, Japanese and Jewish immigrants through out the history of the U.S. Good companion to Zinn's A People's History of the United States. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cisco Dilg | 7/29/2013

    " yeah, I only read 2.5 chapters, I jigsawed on the rest of them and this book is a great reflection on the experiences of "others" in American history "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anjeanette McKay | 3/2/2013

    " All the American history they don't teach you in high school. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alyssa | 2/7/2013

    " This book is so insightful. Lots of Americans have, perhaps, a vague idea of our history, but Takaki tells it in such a way that the reader can more accurately understand that history from a variety of perspectives. Takaki is a gifted storyteller, and I am thankful for having read this book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jason | 10/23/2012

    " a great book. A must read! Compares to Zinn's "People's History" "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Adam | 10/10/2012

    " A lot of interesting information, but kinda rambling. The authors ideology shines through in full force, and he tried a bit too hard to make the writing colorful or artsy. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Taylor | 9/27/2012

    " I read this in high school - it was the summer reading for our junior year American Interdisciplinary Studies class [we also read Snow Falling on Cedars:]. As I remember it was a very insightful way of looking at America's history...I should probably re-read this. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kevin | 11/26/2011

    " An eye opening view of American history from the viewpoint of minorities. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Helen | 11/18/2011

    " Narrative text that contain stories of immigrants that came to America and their way of looking for new opportunities for a better life. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 C.D. George | 8/11/2011

    " A great second look at American history through different lenses. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Peony | 3/5/2011

    " This book is about the life of the immigrants in America. Their positive and negative experiences along with what motivated them to come to a new country to start a new life. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mati | 2/6/2011

    " Fantastic in the same vein as the incredible People's History of the United States by Howard Zinn. Takaki takes multicultural US history to wonderous heights! Horribly informative! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kevin | 9/21/2010

    " An eye opening view of American history from the viewpoint of minorities. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Angela | 8/11/2010

    " I feel that this book is a must read for everyone 14 and older!
    It discusses so many topics that you don't learn in American History. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mike | 7/29/2010

    " A fascinating look at different periods in US history from a multicultural perspective. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Madison | 6/8/2010

    " The cultures of this land of ours have traversed far beyond physical bounds to set up shop; all ethnicity's have fought to earn what they now inhabit. This book tactfully exhibits a few of these journeys. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kristen | 6/2/2010

    " This is a very interesting view of American history.

    It is history from the perspective of various non-anglo Americans.

    I was shocked to learn some of what I learned.

    The book is well sited and researched.

    I highly recommend. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Glorious.Clio | 12/13/2009

    " I read it in an immigrant experience class. Takaki makes some good points, but they're somewhat lost in long-winded explainations and random Shakespearean allusions. "

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About the Author
Author Ronald Takaki

Ronald Toshiyuki Takaki (1939–2009) , born in Oahu, Hawaii, was an academic, historian, ethnographer, and author. His work addresses stereotypes of Asian Americans, such as the model minority concept.

About the Narrator

Peter Berkrot is an audiobook narrator and stage, screen, and television actor and acting coach. A forty-year veteran of stage and screen, he was the director of narration for the Emmy-nominated The Truth about Cancer. He has voiced over three hundred audiobook titles, winning numerous Earphones Awards, a 2012 Audie Award nomination, and a 2016 Audie Award. He has appeared in Showtime’s Brotherhood and Loosies and played Angie D’Annunzio in Caddyshack.