Download The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, 10th Anniversary Edition Audiobook

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, 10th Anniversary Edition Audiobook, by Michelle Alexander Extended Sample Click for printable size audiobook cover
Author: Michelle Alexander Narrator: Karen Chilton Publisher: Recorded Books, Inc. Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: April 2012 ISBN: 9781464048258
4.00043548911277 out of 54.00043548911277 out of 54.00043548911277 out of 54.00043548911277 out of 54.00043548911277 out of 5 4.00 (3,077 ratings) (rate this audio book)
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Seldom does a book have the impact of Michelle Alexanders The New Jim Crow. Since it was first published in 2010, it has been cited in judicial decisions and has been adopted in campus-wide and community-wide reads; it helped inspire the creation of the Marshall Project and the new $100 million Art for Justice Fund; it has been the winner of numerous prizes, including the prestigious NAACP Image Award; and it has spent nearly 250 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. Most important of all, it has spawned a whole generation of criminal justice reform activists and organizations motivated by Michelle Alexanders unforgettable argument that we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it. As the Birmingham News proclaimed, it is undoubtedly the most important book published in this century about the U.S. Now, ten years after it was first published, The New Press is proud to issue a tenth-anniversary edition with a new preface by Michelle Alexander that discusses the impact the book has had and the state of the criminal justice reform movement today. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “Devastating…Alexander does a fine job of truth-telling, pointing a finger where it rightly should be pointed: at all of us, liberal and conservative, white and black.”

    Forbes

  • “In quiet yet forceful writing Alexander, a legal scholar, outlines how the Reagan government exploited 1980s hysteria over crack cocaine to demonize the black population so that ‘black’ and ‘crime’ became interchangeable. It was a war—not on drugs—but on black people.”

    The Guardian (London)

  • “Alexander is absolutely right to fight for what she describes as a ‘much-needed conversation’ about the wide-ranging social costs and divisive racial impact of our criminal justice policies.”

    Newsweek

  • “One of the most influential books of the past twenty years.”

    Chronicle of Higher Education

  • “It is in no small part thanks to Alexander’s account that civil rights organizations such as Black Lives Matter have focused so much of their energy on the criminal justice system.”

    London Review of Books

  • “Explosive…alarming, provocative, and convincing.”

    Kirkus Reviews

  • “Carefully researched, deeply engaging, and thoroughly readable.”

    Publishers Weekly

  • A #1 Amazon.com bestseller
  • A New York Times bestseller
  • A Literary Hub Pick of Best Books of the Decade
  • A Slate Magazine Best Book in Nonfiction of the Last 25 Years
  • A Shondaland Pick of Best Books for Black History Month
  • A Kirkus Reviews Pick of 10 Books That Challenge Racism
  • An Entertainment Weekly Best Book of the Century
  • A BookRiot Pick of Best Nonfiction Books of the Century

Listener Reviews

Write a Review
  • 4.333333 out of 54.333333 out of 54.333333 out of 54.333333 out of 54.333333 out of 5 Calvin | 6/10/2019

    " The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander has been referenced in so many books and for good reason. This book is a staple in criminal justice and presents the country with the ugly truth on our criminal justice system on completely factual grounds. The book can get a bit redundant at times but it is a fantastic read and I highly recommended that everyone reads this at least one time. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 2/18/2014

    " This is probably one of the most important books of the last 50 years, a devastating indictment of the American justice system and the failed war on drugs that has primarily subjected African-American people to mass incarceration on a scale so vast and unfair that its far-reaching effects could ultimately be as devastating as slavery. Read this book and you will come to many different conclusions about race in education, politics, the courts and all other aspects of contemporary American society which is far more broken than most people could have imagined. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rose | 2/3/2014

    " In the introduction, Michelle Alexander states that her goal is to push people sympathetic to the prison reform movement to the point of outrage. She is incredibly successful. Her position is thoroughly supported by well reasoned, accessibly expressed arguments. The book reads very easily and seems to have taken up a very large portion of my brain.... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hakan | 2/1/2014

    " This is one of those books you come across where you want everyone to read. I hope this book starts something. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Becky | 1/27/2014

    " I did find this slow going to read at times but it's important for us all to understand the war on drugs and how it continues racial injustice in our country. I've been volunteering in prison and I think prisons are horrible places, the explosion of the prison population in our country is a great tragedy. The explanation of the erosion of our fourth amendment rights and how policies around police department funding worked to exponentially expand the war on drugs is particularly valuable. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carrie | 1/25/2014

    " Good points and arguments, gets a little repetitive. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dana | 1/23/2014

    " I found the repetitive style hard to bear at times. Nonetheless, this is an important book, and a must-read for every American. You'll walk away angry. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Margaret | 1/13/2014

    " This is a very important book. People need to read and understand about the modern prison/justice system and how it works to keep people in 'bondage.' It's not about being soft on crime, it's about taking a realistic look at how things really work in the 'system' and why some are stuck in the cycle. A must read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 SweetPea | 1/13/2014

    " A compelling book that forcefully lays out the argument that there is a structurally driven undercaste in the US and the challenges to breaking it. Very powerful, in particular the reality of mass incarceration and what it means for minorities not only during incarceration but beyond. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 jessaka | 12/28/2013

    " I really thought that blacks were progressing in our society, after all Obama was elected, and you don't hear much from the black community anymore. What a surprise this book was. It should be required reading in every freshman high school class. It should be talked about in the news, but it isn't. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marone | 12/22/2013

    " Excellent book.... quite dense almost text book like but very informative! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anissa | 10/13/2013

    " So utterly depressing, true but will make The African American feel as though all is hopeless. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lizzie | 8/22/2013

    " A mind-blowing look at our justice and incarceration systems. A dense read but only because it is filled with so much evidence so it is completely worth it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ally | 4/27/2013

    " A must read for all urban teachers. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Miles | 2/19/2013

    " a must read for anyone who cares about justice and truth. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mike | 2/1/2013

    " An important, important book. Contains truths that need to be understood and confronted by all of us. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Vee | 12/25/2012

    " I will write a review shortly. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sonia | 11/22/2012

    " Not perfect, but very effective and motivating. I learned a lot and had the opportunity to re-evaluate my own beliefs about the drug war, mass incarceration, affirmative action, and social change. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Millie | 8/4/2012

    " First part of the book is informative and does a good job at describing how entrenched this issue is. Unfortunately the end is a little weak. I wish she would have offered more solutions instead of taking the book in a more academic direction and comparing today's incarceration system to Jim Crow. "

About the Author

Michelle Alexander is a civil rights advocate and litigator, winning a 2005 Soros Justice Fellowship, and she holds a joint appointment at the Moritz College of Law and the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity at Ohio State University. She served for several years as the director of the Racial Justice Project at the ACLU of Northern California, which spearheaded the national campaign against racial profiling.

About the Narrator

Karen Chilton is a New York–based actor and writer and an accomplished voice-over artist and narrator. She has narrated dozens of audiobooks, won three AudioFile Earphones Awards, and in 2020 won the prestigious Audie Award for Best Nonfiction Narration. Her voice can be heard on numerous national network television, radio, and Internet advertising campaigns.