Download A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court (Abridged) Audiobook

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court (Abridged) Audiobook, by Mark Twain Extended Sample Click for printable size audiobook cover
Author: Mark Twain Narrator: Kerry Shale Publisher: Copyright Group Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2014 ISBN: 9781780002835
3.42 out of 53.42 out of 53.42 out of 53.42 out of 53.42 out of 5 3.42 (24 ratings) (rate this audio book)
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When Connecticut mechanic and foreman Hank Morgan is knocked unconscious, he wakes not to the familiar scenes of nineteenth-century America but to the bewildering sights and sounds of sixth-century Camelot. Although confused at first and quickly imprisoned, he soon realizes that his knowledge of the future can transform his fate. Correctly predicting a solar eclipse from inside his prison cell, Morgan terrifies the people of England into releasing him and swiftly establishes himself as the most powerful magician in the land, stronger than Merlin and greatly admired by Arthur himself. But the Connecticut Yankee wishes for more than simply a place at the Round Table. Soon, he begins a far greater struggle: to bring American democratic ideals to Old England. Complex and fascinating, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court is a darkly comic consideration of the nature of human nature and society.

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Listener Reviews

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  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 George | 2/19/2014

    " Twain has written quite a critique here of the way the church ruled everything in England in the 6th Century. While the book is full of humor, he really lays into knight heraldry and the church pretty hard, and also writes gleefully about killing tens of thousands of knights himself, which may have been a kind of comment on the mass slaughter of the Civil War, but which seemed bizarre from such a humorist. Twain experts will understand this, of course, I'm just a fan. But I'll take "Life on the Mississippi" any day instead. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Terri | 2/18/2014

    " What a fun book! I love to be amused. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Meadow | 2/17/2014

    " It started of pretty good, but then the wizard Merlin came into the pic. I wasn't to big on the whole magic thing, And there wasn't enough good dialouge. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Steven | 1/28/2014

    " Had to read it for a book report in History not a very gripping story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Deborah | 1/25/2014

    " Somewhat different than Twain's other book such as Tom Sawyer. Twain's humor shows through in the story but it deals more with political theory and human nature. Still it's a very entertaining read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anne | 1/5/2014

    " Okay, but Twain can do better. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cameron | 12/26/2013

    " One of the most hilarious books I've ever read!! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Emmi | 12/25/2013

    " It was interesting and funny but not interesting and funny enough to sustain me for 400 pages. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jane | 12/25/2013

    " I read this book while sitting alone in a house that was very new to me. I found myself laughing so hard, my sides ached! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Brendon | 12/21/2013

    " I wanted to love this book, but the reader of the audiobook version made it tough to listen to. His voice made so much of it seem boring even when describing all the funny situations. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carol | 10/31/2013

    " Mark Twain is such an imaginative author, all his stories are entertaining. I did enjoy this one, once I "suspended my disbelief" as we readers need to do LOL. The movie was OK, but of course, not as good as the book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Michelle | 10/28/2013

    " Dragged at points but was generally fun. I hadn't realized what an interesting social justice focus this book had. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kevin | 3/3/2013

    " You ever read a book that just makes you feel ignorant? Try a time traveling Mark Twain book with an asshole protagonist visiting very specific unheralded time periods. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jesse | 7/21/2012

    " Mark Twain is the great American author. And though Yankee is not the best of his books it certainly rates high on the list. For me, because it deals irreverently with one of my favorite mythologies, King Arthur and the Camelot legends, it is a double delight. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Orsodimondo | 6/11/2012

    " Divino. Il sogno e l'incubo di tutti quanti. Mio sicuramente. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sharon | 3/19/2012

    " This is one of the first books I read in my quest to bone up on the classics (I decided to start light). I loved this story of the Yankee who gets conked on the head and ends up in Arthur's court. I don't remember how he made it back again, but the story was definitely fun to read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bryan | 3/18/2012

    " Once I stopped focusing on the marathon long sentences (my only real beef with Twain) I really started to understand and enjoy this book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cberke | 1/27/2012

    " I'm so tired of all the apocolyptic hoo-ha lately, but this one is the original American apocolyptic novel, and does it better than everyone else, poor Mark Twain. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Avi | 8/24/2011

    " I tell you what, this Mark Twain guy is a pretty funny writer. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Patrick | 10/10/2010

    " I just couldn't finish this. Not humorous. More like jingoistic bombast. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mike | 8/26/2010

    " Very fun, but strange book. Still haven't figured out for sure how he got there. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Brooke | 5/19/2010

    " More like 2.5 stars. It was interesting and I liked Twain's social commentary, but I have to admit that it was a little long... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carey | 2/26/2010

    " I read this book in school a long time ago but I remember that I loved it. It's a classic and everyone should read it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jeannette | 2/11/2010

    " It has been a few years since I read this. It is the only Twain novel that I have finished and I still remember it. I will have to read it again in order to give it a better review. "

About the Author

Mark Twain, pseudonym of Samuel L. Clemens (1835–1910), was born in Florida, Missouri, and grew up in Hannibal on the west bank of the Mississippi River. He attended school briefly and then at age thirteen became a full-time apprentice to a local printer. When his older brother Orion established the Hannibal Journal, Samuel became a compositor for that paper and then, for a time, an itinerant printer. With a commission to write comic travel letters, he traveled down the Mississippi. Smitten with the riverboat life, he signed on as an apprentice to a steamboat pilot. After 1859, he became a licensed pilot, but two years later the Civil War put an end to the steam-boat traffic.

In 1861, he and his brother traveled to the Nevada Territory where Samuel became a writer for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise, and there, on February 3, 1863, he signed a humorous account with the pseudonym Mark Twain. The name was a river man’s term for water “two fathoms deep” and thus just barely safe for navigation.

In 1870 Twain married and moved with his wife to Hartford, Connecticut. He became a highly successful lecturer in the United States and England, and he continued to write.

About the Narrator

Kerry Shale is a Sony Radio Academy Award winner, a narrator of dozens of audio books, and an actor in films as diverse as Yentl and Welcome to Sarajevo. He won an Audie Award for his narration of Q&A.