Extended Audio Sample

We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed with Our Families: Stories from Rwanda Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed with Our Families: Stories from Rwanda (Unabridged), by Philip Gourevitch
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 3.81 (10,028 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Philip Gourevitch Narrator: Jeff Cummings Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc. Format: Unabridged Audiobook Audio Length: Release Date:
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In April of 1994, the government of Rwanda called on everyone in the Hutu majority to kill everyone in the Tutsi minority. Over the next three months, 800,000 Tutsis were murdered in the most unambiguous case of genocide since Hitler's war against the Jews. This haunting work by Philip Gourevitch, staff writer for the New Yorker, is an anatomy of the killings in Rwanda, a vivid history of the genocide's background, and an unforgettable account of what it means to survive in its aftermath. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Reviews

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Review by Beta Test | 2/11/2014

    " Simply one of the best books I've ever read. Should be a must read for everyone, especially anyone purporting to have an opinion about any intl policy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Review by Sarah Ashley Simmons | 2/6/2014

    " More than recounting the Rwandan genocide, which he does, Gourevitch offers a framework for understanding how and why it happened in a readable way. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Review by Carrie | 1/29/2014

    " In a book full of disturbing images and information, the last image is the one that leveled me the most. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Review by Charis | 1/23/2014

    " Not exactly the "story" format I was expecting but an excellent research piece on the Rwanda genocide. Lots of information in a short space, some sections lost focus and started to drift towards the wars and crises in bordering countries, which, although related, simply became overwhelming. Considering it was written in 1998, I'm curious what a followup might reveal. The best question this book asked is, "what do we do with the survivors?" "

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